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Thread: What Size Drill Bit?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default What Size Drill Bit?

    An amateurish question I know....I plan to start assembling the transom for my LYS(ish) build this evening - transom to be built out of 2 x 10 pine stock and pinned together with 1/2" steel rods. I have the lumber planed and trued up and the 1/2 rods (heavy wall tubing actually) purchased. I haven't mic'ed the tubing to verify it's actual OD but pretending it is spot on at .500" - what's a good bit size to start with for that "just right" fit?

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Kinda depends on what is the "just right fit". Some drill bits make a hole to their "miked-up" size, some don't. I would start with a set of these which will drill to their "miked-up" size and drill some test holes to get the fit you're looking for, a nice set of drills for the money.

    http://www.rockler.com/rockler-25-pc...-point-bit-set

  3. #3
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Steel rods?
    Is this boat to be used in water?

  4. #4
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Aim to end up with a hole 1/16th smaller than your bolt. 7/16ths in this case.
    What grade of steel have you purchased?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    You'll probably encounter problems trying to "point" the front end of hollow steel tubing. It will likely "flare" as it flattens out when you try to form it with a hammer, becoming wider than spec. The rear end, where you will be hammering it, may also split and peen over. If the shaft starts to collapse, well, it's going to be "game over." There's a reason solid rod is specified.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    You'll probably encounter problems trying to "point" the front end of hollow steel tubing. It will likely "flare" as it flattens out when you try to form it with a hammer, becoming wider than spec. The rear end, where you will be hammering it, may also split and peen over. If the shaft starts to collapse, well, it's going to be "game over." There's a reason solid rod is specified.
    I agree, you might try it with a pointed plug in the leading end that has 2 to 3 inches that is turned down to be a slip fit in the tubing with the pointed end the size of the tube OD and
    another plug with a flat end that you could use a brass or hard wood mallet to drive it in with...........$.02

  7. #7
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    I just tossed this up on the other site you posted on.

    Yes, you can use a dado blade for cutting the slot for splining (sometimes I do, sometimes I don’t bother).
    For your LYS I suppose you can go with dowels or biscuits. I consider neither to have a place in real boat building. Dowels aren’t very strong, are typically made of fast rotting wood and when the glue starts to let go any moisture will get to the dowels, which will act like a sponge and draw the moisture deep into the wood. The wood all around the dowel hole will rot first. Biscuits are typically made of easily rotting birch, and likewise don’t have that much strength.
    Splining is like one continuous heavy duty biscuit, of the same wood as what you are glueing, so no more or less rot resistant, the same rate of expansion and contraction and stronger.

    However,.... again, for a LYS any method will work. It’s all about having fun building and using.
    Last edited by nedL; 07-02-2018 at 09:37 PM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Why not just joint the edges and glue with epoxy? Epoxy is infinitely stronger than pine. Add battens cross grain at the plank lands if you like.
    Cant hardly thimk of anything less appropriate than steel tubing.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    For such a small drift I would not use a drill bit smaller than 31/64, or about .015" smaller than the drift itself.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Whatever the pins you use and stock you have..... take a drill bit of the size that is your best guess, say 1/2". Use it to drill a hole in some off-cut of the stock that your transom is made of. This is a test... it's only a test. Your world won't end if the drill bit you chose isn't the correct size. Hammer in the pin. Did it fit "just right?" If yes, then proceed to the real work. If no, then choose another drill bit.

    Jeff

  11. #11
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    If you feel the need to drift the transom you will be better off to rip the stock into square strips, flip them to show edge grain on the outer face then "drift" them together with nails and epoxy one strip at a time, in other words, strip plank the transom.

    I don't know what wall tubing is, sounds like electrical conduit. That would be worthless.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: What Size Drill Bit?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    I don't know what wall tubing is, sounds like electrical conduit. That would be worthless.
    It was "Heavy Wall Tube"
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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