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Thread: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Boone, North Carolina, USA
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    3

    Default 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    Hi all,
    I'm new to this forum, and excited to see what I can learn here!

    I have a 1962 Blue Jay sailboat that I intend to completely restore. I purchased it about one year ago and have spent the year slowly dismantling (SLOWLY......I have a 2 year old) it and identifying the rot/problem areas. All things considered, it's in pretty good shape, but as is the case for many wooden boats, it appears to have sat outside for a while and as a result has some rot in the typical places. My question here is concerning keel rot. The keel is in great shape from bow to stern with the exception of one spot......just astern of the centerboard trunk where it appears water collected and subsequently rotted a hole clean through the keel. I've included a picture here. My question is, what is the best course of action here......can the hole be repaired with a patch and epoxy, or are we talking keel replacement? I apologize if this is a dumb question, but this is my first experience with full wooden boat restoration. I'm familiar with sail boats, and I have a considerable amount of woodworking skills, but again, I'm just getting into the world of wooden boats (and loving it, by the way). Any information you could provide would be greatly appreciated. Thank you!
    IMG_8588.jpg
    Last edited by martindj1; 08-27-2018 at 12:50 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,654

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    First, Welcome to the Woodenboat forum Martin!

    Sorry to see that you have a bit of a problem with that keel. If indeed the rest of the keel is in good shape, you might be able to scarf a new keel section in as long as you are able to reach wood that is not infected. Be aware that rot spores can travel a long way along a crack or through the grain, in some woods. What kind of wood is the keel and what is its molded thickness? Looks like the after end of the center board trunk and logs are affected too, plus the floors that attach to them.
    The first thing would be to strip the paint off of that keel in order to see, truly, how far that rot really goes. Vacuum up that infected wood dust ASAP. Spraying with "Timbor" ,a Borax based rot killer, will insure that the rest of the boat doesn't come down with problems.
    Jay
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 06-23-2018 at 12:51 PM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    15,013

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    I'd drop a LONG dart in the keel. It already has a hole in it,(the trunk).
    How far back is the next floor, and how is it?
    This should be a simple repair actually, unless more decay continues to show up ..white oak has a certain habit.....
    Is the hull plywood?
    Yes, def keep cleaning her up..she seems paint sick.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area- Richmond
    Posts
    15,432

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    I had a '57 and '67 Blue Jay, and loved both of 'em! I'd keep digging into the rotted keelson and see how far the bad wood goes. More photos when you've got to the limits of the rotted wood.
    "The enemies of reason have a certain blind look."
    Doctor Jacquin to Lieutenant D'Hubert, in Ridley Scott's first major film _The Duellists_.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Boone, North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    Thanks for the responses! Jay, as far as I know all of the frame members are white oak. I've already cleaned up the mess, and will look into the Borax spray. Wizbang, the hull is plywood, and she is indeed paint sick. This weekend I plan to strip back the paint, hold my breath, and try to see how far beyond that hole the keel is infected. When I get there I'll post more pics. Thanks again for your responses!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Boone, North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    3

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    I've done a bit more investigating to identify how extensive the rot is on the keel (keelson) of my Blue Jay. I have not yet sanded around the areas to confirm, but by poking, prodding and scraping, I've been able at least find the extent of the soft wood. The rot appears to be confined to two locations 1) Just astern of the centerboard trunk (pic 1), and just forward of the transom (pic 2). In both places it's rotted all the way through. The rest of the keel feels/appears solid. So, both of these rotted areas occur astern of the centerboard trunk (Pic 3 - the two rot locations are under that "floor board" astern of the centerboard trunk). So, my question is (sorry if it's similar to the first question asked......but now you have some more info), is the damage too extensive to simply patch in those spots, or is it better/easier to just scarf in a new stern section of the keel?? Thanks again for your input!
    IMG_9659.jpg IMG_9658.jpg IMG_8009.jpg

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    se pa (Bristol PA)
    Posts
    2,982

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    Well.... it's certainly not a complicated build, straight frames & gussets. Is the Bottom glassed? Take it apart and make new parts! Probably wouldn't take any longer then trying to "fill and patch" A hand held hacksaw blade cuts between plank, and frames rather easy although many of us have graduated to the electric multi tools to cut fasteners and glued joints. you can also cut scarfs in place easier said then done for many.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    NH, USA
    Posts
    523

    Default Re: 1962 Bluejay Keel Rot

    Welcome aboard! You, Sir, have most assuredly found rot! In my book there is only one way to deal with this. Remove all of the affected wood and replace it with sound wood. This will likely be relatively simple on this type of vessel, with a bit of creativity if the hull sheathing is rabbited into the keel. Basic scarf joints should do the trick for the keel and well as the frames. The same should be true for the plywood pieces if needed. I'm more than happy to provide input on how to accomplish this as you dig deeper. Others will be as well, I'm sure.

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