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Thread: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

  1. #1

    Default Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    My Rudder broke yesterday - probably the original and made from Mahogany. It broke one the line of the pintle that is on the transom and the rest has gone on a voyage all of its own. Of course I had a retaining pin in the first pintle, but not on the one below the waterline.

    So I need to make a new rudder.

    I am going to use Iroko and bolt the boards together with 3/8" bronze drifts. What we get in the UK now that is called Mahogany is not the same as was used 70 years ago when she was built.

    Any other suggestions?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
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    4,220

    Default Re: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    Have you researched "mahogany"...there are many types, and also false mahogany's (mahoganies?). It could have been anything...when was FB539 built, and where?

    Rudders are long-standing consumables..

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Alameda, CA
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    10,773

    Default Re: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    Are you planning on glassing it? Moreover - are you going to race class it - if so, lighter and more modern techniques would be better and still keep the form.
    Be wary of your critics, at peace with your decisions, and work hard to be a better man.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
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    Northern Europe
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    9,035

    Default Re: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    I got one hanging up in the barn with the lower edge broken off, but i think the postage to UK might be a bit steep. Any stable kind of wood should work fine. You might find some Meranti or Sapele as a substitute, but some of that can be quite poor depending on source. Iroko should work ok if you get some straight stuff, some of it can be a real pain to work. I would not hesitate to use Larch either if thats more available.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    UK - Somerset
    Posts
    2

    Default Re: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    Just a thought - you could buy a new on off the shelf. If the pintles are in the right place it could get you on the water quicker.
    Theyre still built in Estonia so the prices weren't too extreme the last time I looked a few years ago

    I don't think that mine would disappear like that if it did break. There are cut outs in the rudder to allow fitting where shaped blocks are screwed in after so it can't lift off. The gap between the stern post and the rudder is about 3/8" with the centreline of the pintles behind the leading edge of the rudder.

    good luck either way
    Paul
    Last edited by Paul-l; 06-12-2018 at 04:20 PM.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Have you researched "mahogany"...there are many types, and also false mahogany's (mahoganies?). It could have been anything...when was FB539 built, and where?

    Rudders are long-standing consumables..
    Border Maid was built in 1948 by Woodnuts on the Isle of Wight - one of the first three Folkboats built in the UK. She spent most of her life in the Royal Northumberland Yacht Club at Blythe near Newcastle but is now on the Forth in Edinburgh.

    She was built of mahogany on an oak frame.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    11,519

    Default Re: Timber for Rudder for Folkboat

    You are fortunate that you were able to get home with a broken rudder. That kind of stuff can ruin your entire day! You have several choices for making a new one. While quarter sawn Honduras mahogany would be ideal for the job, getting the right stock might be a problem. If so, consider using the best grade of marine plywood that is available in your ares. It can be either Meranti, Honduras or Douglas fir. The important thing is that it should be the best grade of marine ply available to you where you are located. The material should be of a thickness to allow it to be book matched and glued to a thickness slightly greater than the thickness of the original. Using West system G/flex will give you a panel that is able to deal with the slight forces of latteral flexing that the rudder will be subject to. The pintails can be attached by burying the straps in a mortice prior to glassing. The rudder blade can be shaped to a taper using a power plane and random orbit sander. Following shaping and the entire rudder can be glassed using either polyester or epoxy resin. If you wish to apply the pintails after glassing, a bit of masking to the area of attachment would be needed to allow fitting.

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