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Thread: Anthony Bourdain dead.

  1. #106
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Rob, I see what your saying.

    He was asked in an interview if he ever regretted some mystery food he ate in some far flung location. He said OH YEA, but you have to take one for the team. He said especially where sanitary systems are compromised. You take your course of antibiotics and deal with it, because if you choose to eat "the" food there is a story, the food is their story. If you eat it you will gain their trust and hear their story and that is worth it.

    Rob, I'm sorry for your friend. I've always seen the dark side in Bourdain, his empathy for cultures, the prose in writing showed a true artistic soul. I know as both being an artist, and a cook that creating food sometimes is a whole lot like creating a painting or a sculpture you tap into the same places in your heart, mind and hand.

    I was always struck with the end of each of his shows where he would poetically recount his experience in gut wrenching, beautifully written summation. It transcended food, celebrity , and TV, it was art and it was uniquely Bourdain.
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by jonboy View Post
    Maybe I should get a tv. Or not.
    Nah. But do try the book, it's good.

    What are you doing about it?




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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    No now it's become a thread about two right wing Snowflakes who think it's all about them. Gee that used to be my moniker, but you don't see me bitching like a little girl about it.
    .

    I can come back into this thread if you wish. But i already said.

    Howsaboutdemmets.

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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

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    I remember seeing Bourdain on a few late night talk shows. I expected him to be a bit cocky, but he never was. He was surprisingly open, frank, friendly, funny, and he seemed genuinely vulnerable. He was not at all what I expected and I like him. When you think of the inner pain that leads a person to suicide, I can't help but feel sorry for him.

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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    When lew reads this expect a big lecture.......

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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    "And those who were seen dancing were thought to be insane by those who could not hear the music." Nietzsche


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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Orca View Post
    Nah. But do try the book, it's good.
    Thanks...any one especially ?

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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by jonboy View Post
    Thanks...any one especially ?
    This one.



    My favorite part of the book was when he talks about the home cook that throws fabulous dinner parties and everyone says they should open a restaurant. What ensues if they actually partake in that fantasy is hysterical. From all those friends that come back and want a free meal for life, to the septic backing up just as Ruth Reichl (the NYT food critic at the time) is being denied a table by your coke addicted strung out hostess, as your dishwasher walks out, and your chef is throwing plates because the waiter is screwing someone he wanted to screw.

    Oh and never eat fish on Sunday, hint they don't deliver fresh fish on Sunday.
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  10. #115
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    What Joe said.

    What are you doing about it?




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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    I recall a show in which Bourdain and others were eating at French Laundry. Keller took some of Bourdain's marlboros and made him a tobacco custard so he wouldn't have to interrupt the meal to go out for a smoke.

    I don't imagine that Keller does that sort of thing for every cook who walks in.
    What color are their hands now?

  12. #117
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    This one.



    My favorite part of the book was when he talks about the home cook that throws fabulous dinner parties and everyone says they should open a restaurant. What ensues if they actually partake in that fantasy is hysterical. From all those friends that come back and want a free meal for life, to the septic backing up just as Ruth Reichl (the NYT food critic at the time) is being denied a table by your coke addicted strung out hostess, as your dishwasher walks out, and your chef is throwing plates because the waiter is screwing someone he wanted to screw.

    Oh and never eat fish on Sunday, hint they don't deliver fresh fish on Sunday.
    I recount that soundbite every time someone says I cook well and should open a restaurant. It's what I remember most from the book.

    Regarding suicide in general, again, this is my own experience, it's not that you feel down or even devastated, we can all weather pain in the short term, it's that you believe those feelings will *never end*. You wake up every morning and it washes over you in seconds, that you are in great distress. My worries were all long-term (planning was always a super-power and my future was in the dumper, and I had been traumatized). Mindfulness helped a little, someone asking me, "are you in immediate danger of those things you imagine long-term?" The answer was no, and that helped calm me down. Enough to begin working on my long-term problems, which seemed hopeless at the time. But recovering from such a place does help armor me for the future, just as I don't get bent out of shape any more when a girl I love says things are not working out. It matters, but I know there is still hope for the future.
    When you can take the pebble from my hand, it will be time for you to leave.

  13. #118
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe (SoCal) View Post
    I was always struck with the end of each of his shows where he would poetically recount his experience in gut wrenching, beautifully written summation. It transcended food, celebrity , and TV, it was art and it was uniquely Bourdain.
    Food for thought, for real.
    I'm not leaving.

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  14. #119
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    Not sure if this quote from Bourdain has been posted so here it is (again?)

    "Americans love Mexican food. We consume nachos, tacos, burritos, tortas, enchiladas, tamales and anything resembling Mexican in enormous quantities. We love Mexican beverages, happily knocking back huge amounts of tequila, mezcal, and Mexican beer every year. We love Mexican people—we sure employ a lot of them. Despite our ridiculously hypocritical attitudes towards immigration, we demand that Mexicans cook a large percentage of the food we eat, grow the ingredients we need to make that food, clean our houses, mow our lawns, wash our dishes, and look after our children. As any chef will tell you, our entire service economy—the restaurant business as we know it—in most American cities, would collapse overnight without Mexican workers. Some, of course, like to claim that Mexicans are “stealing American jobs.” But in two decades as a chef and employer, I never had ONE American kid walk in my door and apply for a dishwashing job, a porter’s position—or even a job as a prep cook. Mexicans do much of the work in this country that Americans, probably, simply won’t do.We love Mexican drugs. Maybe not you personally, but “we”, as a nation, certainly consume titanic amounts of them—and go to extraordinary lengths and expense to acquire them. We love Mexican music, Mexican beaches, Mexican architecture, interior design, Mexican films.
    So, why don’t we love Mexico?
    We throw up our hands and shrug at what happens and what is happening just across the border. Maybe we are embarrassed. Mexico, after all, has always been there for us, to service our darkest needs and desires. Whether it’s dress up like fools and get passed-out drunk and sunburned on spring break in Cancun, throw pesos at strippers in Tijuana, or get toasted on Mexican drugs, we are seldom on our best behavior in Mexico. They have seen many of us at our worst. They know our darkest desires.
    In the service of our appetites, we spend billions and billions of dollars each year on Mexican drugs—while at the same time spending billions and billions more trying to prevent those drugs from reaching us. The effect on our society is everywhere to be seen. Whether it’s kids nodding off and overdosing in small town Vermont, gang violence in L.A., burned out neighborhoods in Detroit—it’s there to see. What we don’t see, however, haven’t really noticed, and don’t seem to much care about, is the 80,000 dead in Mexico, just in the past few years—mostly innocent victims. Eighty thousand families who’ve been touched directly by the so-called “War On Drugs”.
    Mexico. Our brother from another mother. A country, with whom, like it or not, we are inexorably, deeply involved, in a close but often uncomfortable embrace. Look at it. It’s beautiful. It has some of the most ravishingly beautiful beaches on earth. Mountains, desert, jungle. Beautiful colonial architecture, a tragic, elegant, violent, ludicrous, heroic, lamentable, heartbreaking history. Mexican wine country rivals Tuscany for gorgeousness. Its archeological sites—the remnants of great empires, unrivaled anywhere. And as much as we think we know and love it, we have barely scratched the surface of what Mexican food really is. It is NOT melted cheese over tortilla chips. It is not simple, or easy. It is not simply “bro food” at halftime. It is in fact, old—older even than the great cuisines of Europe, and often deeply complex, refined, subtle, and sophisticated. A true mole sauce, for instance, can take DAYS to make, a balance of freshly (always fresh) ingredients painstakingly prepared by hand. It could be, should be, one of the most exciting cuisines on the planet, if we paid attention. The old school cooks of Oaxaca make some of the more difficult and nuanced sauces in gastronomy. And some of the new generation—many of whom have trained in the kitchens of America and Europe—have returned home to take Mexican food to new and thrilling heights.
    It’s a country I feel particularly attached to and grateful for. In nearly 30 years of cooking professionally, just about every time I walked into a new kitchen, it was a Mexican guy who looked after me, had my back, showed me what was what, and was there—and on the case—when the cooks like me, with backgrounds like mine, ran away to go skiing or surfing or simply flaked. I have been fortunate to track where some of those cooks come from, to go back home with them. To small towns populated mostly by women—where in the evening, families gather at the town’s phone kiosk, waiting for calls from their husbands, sons and brothers who have left to work in our kitchens in the cities of the North. I have been fortunate enough to see where that affinity for cooking comes from, to experience moms and grandmothers preparing many delicious things, with pride and real love, passing that food made by hand from their hands to mine.
    In years of making television in Mexico, it’s one of the places we, as a crew, are happiest when the day’s work is over. We’ll gather around a street stall and order soft tacos with fresh, bright, delicious salsas, drink cold Mexican beer, sip smoky mezcals, and listen with moist eyes to sentimental songs from street musicians. We will look around and remark, for the hundredth time, what an extraordinary place this is.
    The received wisdom is that Mexico will never change. That is hopelessly corrupt, from top to bottom. That it is useless to resist—to care, to hope for a happier future. But there are heroes out there who refuse to go along. On this episode of “Parts Unknown,” we meet a few of them. People who are standing up against overwhelming odds, demanding accountability, demanding change—at great, even horrifying personal cost."

    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  15. #120
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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.

    It's Tony. I could tell from the opening lines he has a truly unique voice.

    Link to the original

    http://anthonybourdain.tumblr.com/po...er-the-volcano
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  16. #121
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    Quote Originally Posted by JimD View Post
    Not sure if this quote from Bourdain has been posted so here it is (again?)
    was Bourdain OK with exploiting low cost illegal labor at the cost of American Jobs and wages? no wonder wages have been stagnant since the 1990's... typical moronic drivel... sad to see that Bourdain was just regurgitating the talking points of the exploitative upper class.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    was Bourdain OK with exploiting low cost illegal labor at the cost of American Jobs and wages? no wonder wages have been stagnant since the 1990's... typical moronic drivel... sad to see that Bourdain was just regurgitating the talking points of the exploitative upper class.
    It's truly evident that you have no knowledge of Bourdain. Here is one simple example when he left Les Halles, he hand picked his Mexican successor.



    Sadly he recently passed from cancer.

    Carlos Llaguno Garcia, the executive chef overseeing both locations of the classic bistro Les Halles died of cancer yesterday at the age of 38. Garcia was a native of Puebla, Mexico, and after moving to the US at the age of seventeen, landed a job cooking at Les Halles, where he was mentored in part by Anthony Bourdain. Bourdain chose Garcia to replace him as the executive chef when he left Les Halles. By his own account, he "became a chef thanks to sheer perseverance."
    Bourdain himself took to Facebook to mourn the loss of his friend: "Rest In Peace Chef Carlos Llaguno Garcia. A great friend, a great chef, a great person. He will be missed by all who knew him."
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  18. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    was Bourdain OK with exploiting low cost illegal labor at the cost of American Jobs and wages? .
    No. Why do you ask?
    One of the most enduring qualities of an old wooden boat is the smell it imparts to your clothing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    I'll also add that what made Bourdain unique is his level of self-deprecation, even with regard to professional skills, such as describing his early days in a restaurant kitchen and encountering guys who were badasses. He wasn't on a pedestal. We could relate to him.

    I'll be interested to hear what Jacques Pepin has to say, if anything. Jacques is a much more moderated personality, with a gentle wry wit, but Tony had admiration for him as the real deal, someone of real professional skill.
    And here it is:

    http://www.wtnh.com/news/connecticut...ain/1256659710
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  20. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daniel Noyes View Post
    was Bourdain OK with exploiting low cost illegal labor at the cost of American Jobs and wages? no wonder wages have been stagnant since the 1990's... j
    Actually you are thinking of Donald Trump.
    https://www.vox.com/2018/2/13/164665...-guest-workers
    https://www.vox.com/policy-and-polit...b-visa-program
    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2...-of-mar-a-lago
    Tom

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    Default Re: Anthony Bourdain dead.


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    ^ Yeah that episode was surreal. Iggy pop living a modest, gentle life on the Florida coast. We all get old.
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    #120, last para.
    "The received wisdom is that Mexico will never change. That is hopelessly corrupt, from top to bottom. That it is useless to resist—to care, to hope for a happier future. But there are heroes out there who refuse to go along. On this episode of “Parts Unknown,” we meet a few of them. People who are standing up against overwhelming odds, demanding accountability, demanding change—at great, even horrifying personal cost."
    . I was thinking that the same applies to the US at present.

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    Iggy's modest, gentle life
    I'm reminded of Alice Cooper, who also maintains certain posh food, wine and other tastes that are inconsistent with his stage image. He's very well spoken and knowledgable on many subjects and is even an excellent amateur golfer, indeed, so much so that he likely could have been a pro had he focused on that instead of his musical career.

    As the original pioneers die away, so too goes the genre they made. Neil Young (whom I admire) was wrong. Rock is dead. And Iggy tells us here that maybe it's not better to burn out than fade away. The beauty of getting old is that it means you've made it through. In the end, Bourdain chose another path, ironically at odds with his "what does it say about us" query to Iggy as shown in the clip. The two were close. I wonder what Iggy's thoughts and feelings were about the choices Bourdain made.

  25. #130
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    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    #120, last para.
    "The received wisdom is that Mexico will never change. That is hopelessly corrupt, from top to bottom. That it is useless to resist—to care, to hope for a happier future. But there are heroes out there who refuse to go along. On this episode of “Parts Unknown,” we meet a few of them. People who are standing up against overwhelming odds, demanding accountability, demanding change—at great, even horrifying personal cost."
    . I was thinking that the same applies to the US at present.
    But will it take a revolution, or just an election? That's the question. The corrupt and wealthy think that revolution will never happen here, they're safe. Well It happened here before. True, before a massive military industrial complex that could murder people by the millions. But even before that, business, at least ethical ones, are finding out that turmoil is COSTLY. They're still not supporting social justice, but some have at least realized that Trump is very costly to their bottom line.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sky Blue View Post
    I'm reminded of Alice Cooper, who also maintains certain posh food, wine and other tastes that are inconsistent with his stage image. He's very well spoken and knowledgable on many subjects and is even an excellent amateur golfer, indeed, so much so that he likely could have been a pro had he focused on that instead of his musical career.

    As the original pioneers die away, so too goes the genre they made. Neil Young (whom I admire) was wrong. Rock is dead. And Iggy tells us here that maybe it's not better to burn out than fade away. The beauty of getting old is that it means you've made it through. In the end, Bourdain chose another path, ironically at odds with his "what does it say about us" query to Iggy as shown in the clip. The two were close. I wonder what Iggy's thoughts and feelings were about the choices Bourdain made.
    Mick Jagger studied business as an undergraduate student at the London School of Economics. I think he studied well.

    I've also read that Cooper is quite a golfer. Nothing, in my opinion, could be more opposite of rebellious rock and roll, than golfing. Perhaps yacht racing.
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  27. #132
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    p
    "Republicans in Congress have a simple excuse for why they donít want to extend the $600-per-week federal unemployment benefits that are scheduled to expire at the end of July: The money, they say, will discourage Americans from going back to work, and slow down the countryís reopening, since businesses wonít be able to rehire staff.

    On a moral level, this position is mean-spirited at best, since it implies that we should be forcing low-wage service workers back onto the job and risk lung death in the midst of a pandemic that is presently exploding out of control across the entire Sun Belt just so they can make rent. From a macroeconomic perspective, the argument is dicey as well, since pulling the plug on aid would hurt consumer spending and potentially put millions of jobs at risk. (I mean, if you want people to go out to the Galleria to shop, they need money. Thatís science.)"

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  29. #134
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    Every time I see Tony my heart aches a little bit more I miss him like I never thought I would
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    His forthright nature and candor were rare things in an industry that all too often rewards pretense.

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    can’t wait to see how bluey builds on this common ground

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    I can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob (oh, THAT Bob) View Post
    Mick Jagger studied business as an undergraduate student at the London School of Economics. I think he studied well.

    I've also read that Cooper is quite a golfer. Nothing, in my opinion, could be more opposite of rebellious rock and roll, than golfing. Perhaps yacht racing.
    The publicity vs the reality. The actual wild boys have mostly burnt out, died or like rock drummer I once worked with live somewhere very quiet and cannot listen to music let alone play it because they are either deaf, or any sound makes their ears hurt.
    The ones still lucid either gave up music for the public service, got some unfortunate girl pregnant and became suburban mortgage holders, or saved their money and went into real estate big time, and never tell anyone.

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    Eat at a local restaurant tonight. Get the cream sauce. Have a cold pint at 4 oíclock in a mostly empty bar. Go somewhere youíve never been. Listen to someone you think may have nothing in common with you. Order the steak rare. Eat an oyster. Have a negroni. Have two. Be open to a world where you may not understand or agree with the person next to you, but have a drink with them anyways. Eat slowly. Tip your server. Check in on your friends. Check in on yourself. Enjoy the ride.

    Happy Bourdain Day

    He would have been 65

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    +1000 Joe, our usual watering holes are suffering. I don't go out to eat as my tastes are so blah that restaurants don't have anything on menu that I would be interested in. Food holds no interest for me. However beer is everything! Whenever I can go out to a watering hole I love to yak at whoever is on the next barstool (6 feet away). Sometimes works out great, sometimes not! I tip way over usual as I realize that my tender has probably had a rough past 2 years... I was 65....

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