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Thread: skin on frame sailboat?

  1. #36
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    Default Re: skin on frame sailboat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post
    Even at the size of build you're considering, you'll need to find a way to leverage this boat up onto the roof of your truck. Guaranteed you'll figure out a way to do it, though. I had a 13' SOF Gentry Whitehall and it was just on the edge of what I could lever up there. I usually found a way to skid it up from behind the truck up onto the rack. Or I'd have my wife come on out and help me pick the thing up. There was just that much less of a chance that I'd drop the thing or dent my truck. Getting it off was much easier. Gravity did most of the work.
    You may recall, when I built Meerkat, she was designed to fit in the bed of my truck without sticking out too far. That put a limitation on length that made it hard to take friends sailing, which is what I'm trying to overcome here. I wonder if Splinter is good for sailing two up or more?

  2. #37
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    Default Re: skin on frame sailboat?

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I actually have considered this, although many of these are a bit wet for sailing in the waters I live near. From my perspective, part of the beauty of these is that they come apart, and you don't have to lift the whole thing at once.
    Fair play, what about a small Trimaran, same advantages of light individual parts with the advantage of most of your body inside and out of the weather. You could even go more kayak than canoe and use a spray deck.

    Frank Smoot has a 14 ft tri at 110 pounds all up on face book - but I canít find reference on his site http://www.diy-tris.com/2012/new-boats-n-photos.htm

    With craft like these the devil is in the detail to get it simple and quick to rig but working it all out is part of the fun.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: skin on frame sailboat?

    Quote Originally Posted by tink View Post
    Fair play, what about a small Trimaran, same advantages of light individual parts with the advantage of most of your body inside and out of the weather. You could even go more kayak than canoe and use a spray deck.

    Frank Smoot has a 14 ft tri at 110 pounds all up on face book - but I can’t find reference on his site http://www.diy-tris.com/2012/new-boats-n-photos.htm

    With craft like these the devil is in the detail to get it simple and quick to rig but working it all out is part of the fun.
    I was thinking about such a boat in connection with Zest, Roger Woods' design with hiking racks with flotation. He built amas for his own boat, turning it into a trimaran. I was thinking of maybe a narrow dinghy with amas well above the water, that would be more forgiving than a normal dinghy with hiking racks but with lighter amas than a true trimaran.

  4. #39
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by johnw View Post
    I was thinking about such a boat in connection with Zest, Roger Woods' design with hiking racks with flotation. He built amas for his own boat, turning it into a trimaran. I was thinking of maybe a narrow dinghy with amas well above the water, that would be more forgiving than a normal dinghy with hiking racks but with lighter amas than a true trimaran.

    What about Michael Storer’s C12 Club as a starting point it probably offers more protection than the Zest and I am not sure you need the complexity of a double bottom.

    https://www.storerboatplans.com/boat...racing-dinghy/



    As a concept - a monohull with outriggers it is a good route as this guy proved picking up an old ISO for peanuts and adding outriggers

    https://youtu.be/y79a5qejTFY



    https://tinkboats.wordpress.com
    http://proasail.blogspot.co.uk
    What I get up to
    https://youtu.be/X9NZEyvpb_Y Streaker dinghy
    https://youtu.be/oni-3rJzxqQ Sail Canoe
    https://youtu.be/eW078PPgJak Proa

  5. #40
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    Default Re: skin on frame sailboat?

    The double bottom would be nice, but by the time you've added outrigger is the boat still likely to be able to continue sailing after a capsize? BTW, what does the Cub weigh?

  6. #41
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    Charlottesville, Virginia - USA
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    Default Re: skin on frame sailboat?

    Quote Originally Posted by skuthorp View Post
    Sailing a canoe as I do, I see no reason that a SOF sailing canoe would not work similarly.
    SOF sailing canoes work great.


    johnw: "So, here's the thing. If it's true to Chapelle's lines, it's not a planing hull, and that's one of the things I wanted."
    Just so (which I did note), and it seemed you were looking for speed, hence my mention of the Annabelle Skiff - I've had her up on plane with two aboard. Clearly not self rescuing/baling, though she does have permanent floatation installed.

    I see no issues with the Avenger or similar, if you want to go that way.

    An outrigger canoe can be very fast indeed. I've got a couple out, with another on the way. I took this one on the Everglades Challenge this year. Err, with different amas, rather than these 24' long bamboo logs.

    Fast, stable and easy. This one, in the style of a Perahu Katir from Indonesia, was quite dry in the rough stuff. And fast. Hard to tack and a tight fit in lots of places, though.
    Multi-hull small boats are tedious to rig and de-rig, so cartopping gets old fast.

    I've had two people in Splinter (while paddling), btw, but she's definitely a one person + dog or small child boat. I have a larger single outrigger canoe on the drawing board, but it will be a while until I can get around to building it.

    Hybrid bottoms work well - my Gunning Dory has one, and I've got a couple more with those bottoms coming up. They do add plenty of weight, relatively speaking.

    I like the Avenger. The H14 is another multi-chined dinghy that would be great for a SOF conversion.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: skin on frame sailboat?

    Quote Originally Posted by DGentry View Post
    SOF sailing canoes work great.


    johnw: "So, here's the thing. If it's true to Chapelle's lines, it's not a planing hull, and that's one of the things I wanted."
    Just so (which I did note), and it seemed you were looking for speed, hence my mention of the Annabelle Skiff - I've had her up on plane with two aboard. Clearly not self rescuing/baling, though she does have permanent floatation installed.

    I see no issues with the Avenger or similar, if you want to go that way.

    An outrigger canoe can be very fast indeed. I've got a couple out, with another on the way. I took this one on the Everglades Challenge this year. Err, with different amas, rather than these 24' long bamboo logs.

    Fast, stable and easy. This one, in the style of a Perahu Katir from Indonesia, was quite dry in the rough stuff. And fast. Hard to tack and a tight fit in lots of places, though.
    Multi-hull small boats are tedious to rig and de-rig, so cartopping gets old fast.

    I've had two people in Splinter (while paddling), btw, but she's definitely a one person + dog or small child boat. I have a larger single outrigger canoe on the drawing board, but it will be a while until I can get around to building it.

    Hybrid bottoms work well - my Gunning Dory has one, and I've got a couple more with those bottoms coming up. They do add plenty of weight, relatively speaking.

    I like the Avenger. The H14 is another multi-chined dinghy that would be great for a SOF conversion.
    Thanks for reminding me of the Annabelle skiff. I currently have a 9' 6" stitch and goo dinghy, and find it a little cramped for two people. I do like monohulls for their carrying capacity and maneuverability. I do think I'll need something a little longer than Annabelle, but I find the boat attractive and suspect the web frame construction would be stiff enough.

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