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Thread: Thoughts on canoe building books

  1. #1
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    Default Thoughts on canoe building books

    Hi All;
    My wife wants a canoe so I have been looking for a good book with plans to follow and was wondering if anyone has used a book to build a canoe and could drop some pictures of the result. I am familiar skin on frame construction, currently building a kayak for myself using this method. I would prefer to do something in the stitch and glue method because I do not have a lot of space for a mold or forms.
    The kind of canoe she wants is a double touring canoe; I would like to also build a open double paddle canoe for my oldest as a first boat.
    Thanks

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    http://www.selway-fisher.com/Opcan16.htm

    Good ones in here, his smaller ones like the Kate would be good for your daughter. He has a good simple book on the S’n’G method.

    sorry the image below is a bit off topic. I tried to delete it but can’t figure out how yet. It is a Lutra canoe by David Nichols, great double blade canoe but it requires a srongback.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by Matt young; 05-22-2018 at 06:48 AM.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    I built a D16 from a book by Dennis Davis. Covers the construction of the hull, making paddles and even a simple sail rig.

    https://www.amazon.com/BUILD-YOUR-CA.../dp/B00779MUJG

    Paddles ok. Still have it in the barn roof, built 8 years ago from cheap 4mm ply and polyester resin tape seam. Friends used it last year to travel down the local river.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    There really is no reason the circumvent buying plans, even the best books are not the best place to build from. Plans, actual plans are NOT that expensive.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    If you're not that familiar with canoes read about canoes in general so you end up picking a suitable design. Start with your local library, you'll be surprised what you can get through interlibrary loans. Even canoe books that talk about a different building method have info on canoe shapes and it probably wouldn't be a waste of time reading them. Stitch and glue books about boats other than canoes are also a good idea.

    I agree with Denise, but if you are building the kayak from a book you may not even know that plans are also sold separately from books. Spend some time googling and shopping around for designs. Some plans actually include an illustrated manual with lots of tips and photos as part of the package. But not all of them, read the fine print.

    Not needing any molds/forms with stitch and glue is a topic that has been the subject of some heated discussion, and I think it depends on the type of boat.

    A long skinny form as a canoe that is made from long, narrow, floppy plywood panels would greatly benefit from some sort of strongback with either male or female molds, otherwise it might come out twisted or lopsided. I have come to that conclusion while fitting together several fairly narrow boats. The first one, built entirely without forms and out of fairly flimsy materials, came out a bit twisted. Not enough to affect performance, but enough for me to notice. With the second one I caved and built a rudimentary strongback/cradle system that is currently taking up space in my shed (with the unfinished boat still on it).

    With a shorter, stubby shape, such as a small dinghy that may be built around bulkheads and seats that stay in the boat as flotation chambers, you may get away without forms or even frames. I built a little 8' stitch and glue kid's boat and built it on the floor and on sawhorses and didn't need any forms. It had a rigid bottom consisting of laminated pine planks and a solid midships frame made from 2x4's.

    But for a canoe I would absolutely recommend something rigid to align the panels. A male mold can be contained almost entirely inside the boat and doesn't really take up that much more space than the boat itself. If you fix it on lockable casters, you can roll it around. Or you can build it low and lift it onto sawhorses or milk crates as needed.

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BOI View Post
    If you're not that familiar with canoes read about canoes in general so you end up picking a suitable design. Start with your local library, you'll be surprised what you can get through interlibrary loans. Even canoe books that talk about a different building method have info on canoe shapes and it probably wouldn't be a waste of time reading them. Stitch and glue books about boats other than canoes are also a good idea.

    I agree with Denise, but if you are building the kayak from a book you may not even know that plans are also sold separately from books. Spend some time googling and shopping around for designs. Some plans actually include an illustrated manual with lots of tips and photos as part of the package. But not all of them, read the fine print.

    Not needing any molds/forms with stitch and glue is a topic that has been the subject of some heated discussion, and I think it depends on the type of boat.

    A long skinny form as a canoe that is made from long, narrow, floppy plywood panels would greatly benefit from some sort of strongback with either male or female molds, otherwise it might come out twisted or lopsided. I have come to that conclusion while fitting together several fairly narrow boats. The first one, built entirely without forms and out of fairly flimsy materials, came out a bit twisted. Not enough to affect performance, but enough for me to notice. With the second one I caved and built a rudimentary strongback/cradle system that is currently taking up space in my shed (with the unfinished boat still on it).

    With a shorter, stubby shape, such as a small dinghy that may be built around bulkheads and seats that stay in the boat as flotation chambers, you may get away without forms or even frames. I built a little 8' stitch and glue kid's boat and built it on the floor and on sawhorses and didn't need any forms. It had a rigid bottom consisting of laminated pine planks and a solid midships frame made from 2x4's.

    But for a canoe I would absolutely recommend something rigid to align the panels. A male mold can be contained almost entirely inside the boat and doesn't really take up that much more space than the boat itself. If you fix it on lockable casters, you can roll it around. Or you can build it low and lift it onto sawhorses or milk crates as needed.
    We built stitch& glue kayaks, the beauty of S&G is not using a strong back, when this seams are stitched together with wire ties or wire they pop up into shape like folding a cardboard box into shape!

    But I'm not the one for this conversation because I'm somewhat prejudiced towards traditional building LOL
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 05-22-2018 at 02:16 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    I'm not sure the aversion to forms: the space that it takes up is exactly what the canoe takes up. The only time it takes up more is when the canoe comes off the form, and if you are willing then to trash the form it is only for a little while.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Maybe one of the easiest formless options below. I guess it would help if you had them CNC it out for you. They have a number of sizes available.

    I like using forms as I usually am putting together my own designs. But I can see the beauty of methods like the one below if you get good at it, and are very very careful.

    http://bandbyachtdesigns.com/moccasin_canoe/


    2B183A30-D842-4154-B0AD-5ADEBDA8F887.jpg
    Last edited by Matt young; 05-22-2018 at 02:57 PM.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Buy Plans it will make the process more enjoyable, and you will eliminate a lot of questions and mistakes.

    Bill Thomas's Fox would be a good choice for an open double paddle. There is a full series of build videos on offcenter harbor if you sign up.

    https://billthomasmaker.com/products/fox-canoe-plans

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOfJGMxI8Io


    https://www.offcenterharbor.com/billthomas-foxkitspecs/

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    So I am editing because my reply I did didn't feel like it played right, sorry about that; my writing comes off pretty cold and stand-offish when I get wordy and is sometimes taken the wrong way, so I am going to try again. My wife really doesn't want a Skin boat, and would prefer plywood. She wants something that can be tandem, me, with kids, 2 girls, and is rather stuck on the traditional Canadian Style Canoe. The more I look into it the more I feel this is going to be a purchase and not a build but I am willing to try something. I said book because that is what I used for my Kayak, Building the Greenland Kayak, although I didn't build a greenland kayak lol. Anything that is thoroughly laid out in the directions is fine by me it doesn't need to be a book; I would prefer the option of digital plans because I have access to a 36" plotter and CAD Software, so pre-printed plans are somewhat unnecessary where I can plot and print on my own. I can loft and cut my own plywood to save some money as well.
    With all that said the design I guess would be a prospector type, high capacity, canoe. This concerns me because I know how hard a large canoe is to paddle, that is why I went with a Kayak. Likely flat water but we do live on an island with great sea kayaking opportunities, I am not sure if there is a "sea canoe" design out there. I am having huge issues picking a design that fits my wifes sense of... style?... and my sense of functionality.
    As for a double paddler for the oldest, that can be anything designed with the new paddler in mind really. I thought about doing a modified Tom Yost sea bee with an open deck; but that really isn't a canoe, more like a modified kayak.
    The Moccasin looks good reminds me of the Rob Roy or the Easy Glide from Mechanics Illustrated; I thought about trying the Glide Easy but the only documented attempt was full of issues and concerns.
    Last edited by Veinot; 05-22-2018 at 05:30 PM.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    A canoe is not hard to paddle.. I canoe is impossible to paddle until one learns how.
    The Masons were my inspiration and I've been known to free style a bit..

    but it's been years since.



    Prospector is a great design. there are plans for it in plywood, strip, and I believe lapstrake.


    open water open boat = trouble.

    sea kayaking is nothing at all like paddling a a canoe. even a double paddle canoe is no where near a sea kayak
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    If you haven’t looked through Selway-Fisher’s site yet give it a go. He has a number of canoes in the Canadian style, some he then dropped the height of the ends, for concerns you are expressing I assume. He has a good range of lengths also, for you four. He is an aprochable man, ask him anything you want. He might have the CAD files to give you also I don’t know. “Sea Canoe” sounds like that might be a decked canoe. Bufflehead like, but that doesn’t fit a family of four. Or deck over a larger Prospector and stay alert.

    I agree, a canoe is not hard to paddle, when solo sit in the center as shown. I paddle straight into strong winds with mine no problem. But I am not sitting way in the stern.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    I have 4 books about building cedar strip canoes and one book devoted to wood and canvas canoes. I have another 2 or 3 books about the history of canoeing and canoe design.

    Personally I have built 4 cedar strip canoes (3 tandem and one solo), 3 or 4 geodesic airolite solo canoes, and I have restored one Old Town wood-canvas canoe. I am presently building Whisp from plywood, which is not a canoe, but is similar in size and weight to a tandem canoe.

    Photos of my various boat projects can be seen on my SmugMug website <here> - and for Whisp <here>

    Some observations, based on my limited experience:
    Most of the methods I have tried require first building some kind of form/mould/strongback which can require a significant amount of time and materials. The resources required for the building form are less significant for someone who will be building more than one boat of the same design, but for a one-off builder, don't underestimate what must be done before you actually start building the boat.

    In increasing levels of time and materials, I would rate the requirements for building the jig thusly:
    The moulds for Plat Montfort's geodesic airolite designs are quickly and cheaply built from cardboard. Great for one-off builders, but I doubt the cardboard moulds would hold up good enough for a second boat. Also, the Airolite boats are VERY light and require great care.

    Whisp - a flat bottom rowing skiff which would be better than most canoes on lakes, but much less useful on flowing rivers - requires only two moulds. It's relatively fast and painless to build compared to other methods.

    Cedar strip construction requires making 8-12 moulds which consumes a lot of time and materials. However, the work is not too demanding and some very nice designs can be built with limited woodworking skills. Personally, I do not care for the process - too much noise and dust. Nor do I recommend finishing cedar strip canoes 'bright' - that is, varnished epoxy - because of the upkeep required. Most wooden boats for practical use, should be painted, mostly.

    Canvas covered wood canoes rerquire the most elaborate building form, which just about doubles the work and cost for a one-off builder. The finished product, however, can be very nice, and perhaps more durable and practical than a cedar stripper.

    So if you want to keep the cost and time required to build a form to a minimum - and - if you want something more durable than a geodesic airolite canoe - then I would recommend some kind of plywood construction. Unfortunately, plywood tandem canoes rarely have the sophisticated and elegant appearance of a traditional Canadian canoe. Cedar strip or wood-canvas construction are far more likely to satisfy your wife's sense of style than plywood construction.

    My suggestion would be to either:
    a. build a cedar stripper, which is a miserable job, but which will make your wife happy (and, potentially, a very good canoe) - or -
    b. buy a kit for plywood construction, planks already cut to shape for quick and easy construction, so you get a pretty good boat (but not necessarily a pretty boat) with very little fuss and mess.

    Chesapeake Light Craft offers a few designs for plywood construction <here>

    As previously mentioned the Selway Fisher designs might work; for a family of four, I would want at least 17' in a traditional canoe <here>

    For cedar strip plans, Bear Mountain is a good place to start, <here> I can suggest others if interested. Again, I am not recommending cedar strip construction; I'm only saying that is an option for someone who has more patience than skills, and a high tolerance for noise, dust, fiberglass and epoxy.

    If you go with a kit, you won't need a book. If you want to build cedar strip, I can recommend some titles.
    Last edited by runswithsizzers; 05-23-2018 at 07:36 AM.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    A little book that I think defines canoes is called something like The Canadian Canoe. The obscenities that are most fiberglass canoes drove the author to write it. If nothing else, it's the best instruction on paddling.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    How old is your son? And what sort of build is he?
    I get a lot of fun out of my 12’ x 30” double paddle open canoe.
    See my blog https://tinkboats.wordpress.com/2015/04/

    it is to my own design based loosely on Selway Fisher - Little Kate and CLC Sassafras among others. It has both fore and aft and symmetry and side to side symmetry so four panels are all identical. If you have CAD access etc you are more than welcome to my files and further develop or just use.

    I did not use any more formers than a piece of wood to spread the hull and get the beam correct.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    My son is non-existent lol, but my oldest daughter is 11 about 5ft tall and thin, maybe 75lbs. Do you have your plans somewhere to download?

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    I was doing some reading on "sea canoeing" and there are a number of schools of thought it would seem but something that should be considered is that many sheltered bays and coves are just like lakes with salty water, fairly flat. I have seen, not many mind you, people in canoes messing about the surf just off coast at Kedji sea side and Rissers beach in Nova Scotia, in fact one of them run me over while I was swimming lol. Maybe that is why some of the beaches here prohibit the use of "floatables" on the public beach. Anyway, I didn't know if it was just a canoe or if they had specifically designed sea canoes, that is why I posed the question. if you take away the sheltered coves there is very little paddling space left in PE, certainly no multi day tours, likely why there are not many canoes for sale here used.... Selway-Fisher comes up a lot and I did see some designs my wife liked so maybe I will order something from them. I have also checked out duck works as well. Are designs with fewer panels a lot easier than multiple panels or is it only a little easier? for a newbie?

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Canoecraft. It's not stitch and glue but it's got a number of designs shown and takes you through step by step. If you're confident and comfortable with it, you can make minor changes to a design to better suit your needs. I built a Redbird from that book and modified it a small bit. Oh, and keep us appraised of your progress. With pictures.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
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  19. #19

    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Bill Mason wasn't all that much bigger. He used a smaller canoe that's all.He was Canada's greatest documentary filmmaker. Here is Becky's website https://www.redcanoes.ca/bill and here is Ted Moore's website https://www.bearmountainboats.ca/

    Good luck and happy paddling

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veinot View Post
    My son is non-existent lol, but my oldest daughter is 11 about 5ft tall and thin, maybe 75lbs. Do you have your plans somewhere to download?


    Sincere apologies, a canoe for your daughter. I don’t think my current design design would work, I am 180lb and 5’ 10”. It would need a reduction in freeboard and volume to work with a double paddle. You say you are able to do CAD, the design is in DelftShip and it would be easy to adjust if your are still interested. DelftShip is free and spits out the panels you then need to export them and use another CAD package to nest them and make them printable.

    My daughter was the same size and age when we bought her a plastic Sit On Top - I think I would be going down that route - second hand would be cheaper than a build and you could sell it with little loss when she no longer wants it.

    Alternatively I would think about a Pirogue type build, very simple with chine logs, no epoxy - you and your daughter could build together over a few weekends and nights.


    It all depends on where you are going to be using the canoe, from a later post you are now thinking of sea canoes which if you are going on the sea requires a different beast all together.

    the issue to consider, based on my experience, size wise they are moving goal posts, built something too complex and she will have outgrown it by the time you finish it.




    https://tinkboats.wordpress.com
    http://proasail.blogspot.co.uk
    What I get up to
    https://youtu.be/X9NZEyvpb_Y Streaker dinghy
    https://youtu.be/oni-3rJzxqQ Sail Canoe
    https://youtu.be/eW078PPgJak Proa

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    I did some measuring and I don't think I can build anything over 14ft until I build a shop or garage. I have plans to do that but not anytime soon. I might have to look at used if I want to get out this year. I guess I should have started there...

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    No worries; I have not seen much around for sit on top but then again have not done much looking either. I have Delftshp but I had not spent much time with it. I could try to scale down your plans and see what I come up with.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Veinot View Post
    No worries; I have not seen much around for sit on top but then again have not done much looking either. I have Delftshp but I had not spent much time with it. I could try to scale down your plans and see what I come up with.

    I have sent you an email, if your reply I will send the file.

    It is in metric if you are ok with that

    I think your first task will be to decide on the centre section that will work for your daughter, simply get her to sit on the floor and use a stick to paddle, use something like cereal boxes to find out where the gunwale needs to be. Just find a gunwale height and beam that works so she doesn’t hit her knuckles on the gunwale. Once you have that play about with the variables to get back to a draft of 105mm for the design load, the canoe weights in at 15kg.

    You can bring the width and depth down a little bit but I would also look at the length - down to about 11 foot and give her more tumblehome, this adds stiffness without having a complex gunwale.

    Approx midships (in Onshape)


    I am happy to tweak the design myself if you are struggling but away without PC until mid next week. Long drive then watching my daughter sail for 3 days.


    A couple of videos so you can see if it is the type of thing you want

    https://youtu.be/KH1Nmz7Bn8g

    https://youtu.be/StwiZDK1qbc

    Blog shows most of the build

    https://tinkboats.wordpress.com
    http://proasail.blogspot.co.uk
    What I get up to
    https://youtu.be/X9NZEyvpb_Y Streaker dinghy
    https://youtu.be/oni-3rJzxqQ Sail Canoe
    https://youtu.be/eW078PPgJak Proa
    Last edited by tink; 05-25-2018 at 02:46 AM.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books


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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Does this appeal? Ignore George. PM me for more details.

    Trevor Paetkau
    Canoe Plans and Custom Boats
    Stratford, ON

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Quote Originally Posted by tpaetkau View Post
    Does this appeal? Ignore George. PM me for more details.

    Stunning boats and a stunning website

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Quote Originally Posted by Veinot View Post
    Hi All;
    My wife wants a canoe so I have been looking for a good book with plans to follow and was wondering if anyone has used a book to build a canoe and could drop some pictures of the result. I am familiar skin on frame construction, currently building a kayak for myself using this method. I would prefer to do something in the stitch and glue method because I do not have a lot of space for a mold or forms.
    The kind of canoe she wants is a double touring canoe; I would like to also build a open double paddle canoe for my oldest as a first boat.
    Thanks
    One of the best books is canoecraft, though I would avoid the designs, I haven't seen the 2015 revision though. Moore works with Killing and he has a nice 17 foot stripper.

    To get a really great design in a touring boat, stitch and glue is not the best option. Canoes are not overly efficient, as are say kayaks. They really can't carry the baggage of a badly optimized hull as can kayaks, and some boats like skiffs can even be generally optimal in S&G, some multihulls can be superior in ply.

    The design problem in Canoes is that at a basic level a canoe is reasonably flat on the bottom, and not a lot is lost in the hydro if the sides are made of ply, but the bilges really need to be efficiently contoured if you want to get efficiency and smooth paddling in the many leaned maneuvers. Really only strip can do that. And the problem with most strip boats, particularly at the outset of interest in the method, is that they are insanely pretty for tripping use, and often have very heavy detailing, and poor outfitting. It is all about the look.

    There are always exceptions, and one major one is the strip building that is involved in the construction of racing boats, and prototyping for molds. Jensen used to be able to design and build a new stripper in 2 days from idea to splash. And the boats were good enough he could race them or pull a commercial mold off them. So strippers don't have to be built with a dainty mindset, but they pretty much always are.

    However, the alternative hard chine boats are normally too crude in section to be worth the effort, and no better in detailing or outfitting.

    Overall I still prefer the strip boats for tripping, but I can't bring myself to actually use the one I designed and built in 1980 in rock gardens.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Double post there.

    I ran some numbers on the above section:

    Canoe areas.jpg

    The area in relation to the block is 76.3%. While stability in canoe is tough to pin down, that is in a range I would prefer for a double paddle canoe, or a kayak. I would like to see 82%, and I think a lot of people with sophisticated canoe experience will still find it tippy for touring at 76%. If one flattens the bottom out to the point where the blue line is or higher, it starts to get dory like. Then one might wonder whether it is really worth doing 238 feet of taped seams for so little gain. It is a tough nut to crack, and I do think I have a solution, yet to be tried. However, I am almost certain that there are not enough people out there interested in making their own tripping boats if it turns out any less pretty than the neighbor's stripper. If it turns out as pretty, they won't want to use it where the big rocks grow.

    NOTE: I checked my files and my 17 foot stripper tripper designed in @ 1980 with inspiration from the Lynn Tuttle boat, is 77.4%, But it was made rather fine in both mid section and PC. People do find it a little tippy, but like in in quartering waves, and find it generally OK when they get settled. With a load it is fine.
    Last edited by Tomcat; 12-05-2018 at 03:32 PM.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    If you take the slightly shallower blue line and strip the hard chines rather than S&G, you get to 82%, drop 238 feet of taping, and replace it with the generally more pleasant work of fitting the strips.

    On a boat of this type I would have the inside and outside glassed in either case, and you could do that and eliminate the taping, though you still need to produce all the seams and loft all the pieces in most cases. It is hard to say what needs to be done in either method as the technology for both strips and S&G has undergone huge improvement over the last 40 years.

    Canoe areas 82 per.jpg

    So this would be a picture of half the center section. My preference is to eliminate tumblehome, but put shears on the inside to gain back clearance, but I left the tunblehome line in also. The idea would be ply except in the rounded transition at the bilges.

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post
    Maybe one of the easiest formless options below. I guess it would help if you had them CNC it out for you. They have a number of sizes available.

    I like using forms as I usually am putting together my own designs. But I can see the beauty of methods like the one below if you get good at it, and are very very careful.

    http://bandbyachtdesigns.com/moccasin_canoe/


    2B183A30-D842-4154-B0AD-5ADEBDA8F887.jpg
    I built a canoe like that to a Glen-L design and it was terrible. There were several things wrong with it. But the fact the bows cranked up at the ends was a large part of it. It was a banana. I have seen a skiff done this way that while not worth it in my opinion, did suit the type and looked reasonable. It was extremely fast to build, like an afternoon, for a 14 foot canoe like thing.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    One thing I have noticed is a number of big names have made S&G canoes that were dogs and had to be withdrawn, so watch yourselves out there.

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    There is a third option which hasn't been mentioned yet- restore a wood/canvas canoe. At least around here, they are relatively easy to find, cost less than 1K, and will give you the experience of building a canoe without having to build a mould. Upon completion, you will have a traditional, beautiful work of art. To aid you in the process you can refer to Jerry Stelmock's and Rolland Thurlow's books.

    Bruce Brown

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    I second Bruce Brown’s recommendation about restoring a wood/canvas canoe. Easy to do, no more expensive than building from scratch. You can work with a tested design, and lots of different canoes available. Craig’s List is a good source. No need for plans, there are some good books available to guide you through any renovation, and there is the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association -- http://www.wcha.org/ -- and its forums -- http://www.wcha.org/forums/index.php. Lots of information available there from folks who have built and restored and used lots of different canoes.

    But there are a number of sources you might consider:

    Take a look at the plans for the Prospector Ranger 15’ or the Peterborough Canadien 16’ by Bear Mountain Boats (and lots of other canoe plans as well) -- https://www.bearmountainboats.com/co...ns/canoe-plans

    Thomas J Hill’s Ultralight Boatbuilding shows how to build three plywood lapstrake canoes -- 11’6”, 13’10” and 15’11”.

    Skip Snaith’s Canoes & Kayaks for the Backyard Builder” has several plans, including a taped plywood 11 foot canoe.

    Robert Morris’s book, if you can get a copy, has plans for skin-on-frame kayaks and a Canadian-style canoe.

    You might consider a stripper -- David Hazen’s The Stripper’s Guide to Canoe-Building” contains plans for a Micmac canoe that Todd Bradshaw (author of the beautiful and informative Canoe RigĻ Essence and Art) considers one of the best canoes he has paddled.

    If you really want to go with plans from an old magazine, I would suggest looking at the March 1938 issue of Popular Mechanics -- https://archive.org/stream/PopularMe.../n183/mode/2up.

    The PM canoe looks appealing and well designed, and there are two articles available from people who have built it, in back issues of the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association’s journal, Wooden Canoe. The April 2006 issue has an article by Alex Comb, who is a well-regarded professional canoe builder, and the Summer 1981 issue has an article by a serious, competent amateur. This canoe has traditional lines, and it looks like a comfortable hull for the kind of use most recreational canoes get. It is built on a strong back, but as Ben Fuller points out, there is no need to keep it after the canoe is removed from it -- presumably you have enough room for a canoe, and so should have enough room for a temporary strongback while the canoe is abuilding. Back issues of Wooden Canoe are available from the WCHA store -- http://www.wcha.org/store/books The WCHA store has several other books that you might find of interest.

    A quick look at the Glide-Easy canoe from Science and Mechanics (is this you are looking at? http://www.svensons.com/boat/?p=RowBoats/glide_easy) shows a round-bottomed canoe that will likely be very tender -- much rounder than most shallow-arch canoes. I would think it suitable only for experience paddlers, rather than for family recreation.

    And again, you should check out the Wooden Canoe Heritage Association’s site -- and forums -- http://www.wcha.org/forums/index.php. I’m biased, of course, being the past president of the WCHA -- but there really is a lot of information available from a friendly, knowledgeable bunch of people, both as you are choosing a course of action, and after you have set out on your project.

    Greg Nolan

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Have a look at the new work being done by Brian Schulz of Cape Falcon Kayaks. Rugged skin on frame canoes ranging from 10 to 14 -15 feet or so, both solo's and doubles, with step by step construction video.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

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    Default Re: Thoughts on canoe building books

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt young View Post

    sorry the image below is a bit off topic. I tried to delete it but can’t figure out how yet. It is a Lutra canoe by David Nichols, great double blade canoe but it requires a srongback.
    Dave Nicols wrote a book about building his canoes. The book includes complete plans for a couple of them. Here's a link to it on amazon:
    https://www.amazon.com/Lapstrake-Can.../dp/1891369725
    I rather be an American than a Republican.

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