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Thread: electric pilot boat

  1. #1
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    Default electric pilot boat

    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    I am guessing that the absence of lines has something to do with getting the pilots on and off, but that would worry me in rough seas.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    The article keeps using the word "is", when I think he means "will be". Looks like a computer rendering to me.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    If I look up SMAR-11N-224 it looks like they are apparently using nickel magnesium cobalt batteries - very interesting.

    http://www.spearpowersystems.com/?page_id=1393


    I hope this pans out.
    Will

  5. #5
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    I hope that RAL has become better at designing pilot boats than they did on the two built by the last boatyard I worked at.

    CW, firstly, the guys who go out on deck in nasty weather are pretty darned experienced at moving about on a heaving deck, and secondly, when it is nasty they wear safety harnesses and clip in to the safety rail that runs just above the handrail in the illustration. Safety is very much top priority among pilots.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Since the design shows solar array on deck, I am presuming that this pilot boat would 'fuel up' at the dock... and the presumptive service cycle (i.e., the amount of hours per day that the boat would be used) permits sufficient recharge time.

    Regardless, I doubt such a craft would be built, without a 'limp home' engine installed. Some years back, my slip neighbor owned a Nordhaven.... big single diesel engine, with bow thrusters and stabilizers.... but it also included a 75HP Yanmar 'limp home' engine. Sort of a 'belt and suspenders' approach, but I thought it was a good idea, for those who could afford it.

    My 'limp home' engine is raised on a mast
    "Reason and facts are sacrificed to opinion and myth. Demonstrable falsehoods are circulated and recycled as fact. Narrow minded opinion refuses to be subjected to thought and analysis. Too many now subject events to a prefabricated set of interpretations, usually provided by a biased media source. The myth is more comfortable than the often difficult search for truth."







  7. #7
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    From RAL's website:

    "The RAlly 1600-E is an aluminum version of its highly successful steel predecessor. It boasts a fully electric twin screw drivetrain and a substantial bank of high energy density batteries that are recharged from shore power. Twin small auxiliary generators give “get home” and range extension capability but are normally not running."
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    CW, firstly, the guys who go out on deck in nasty weather are pretty darned experienced at moving about on a heaving deck, and secondly, when it is nasty they wear safety harnesses and clip in to the safety rail that runs just above the handrail in the illustration. Safety is very much top priority among pilots.
    OK, that makes sense. That deck looked dangerously smooth to me.

    As for being experienced, I'll trust a good strong line much longer than anyone's experience.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    CW, the non-skid surfaces on the decks of pilot boats is all that and more. Plus, in cold climates, the decks and handrails are heated to prevent icing.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    I haven't enough time to work the numbers but some of the examples of electric ferries cited here suggest that this pilot boat might work well.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_boat

    Will
    Will

  11. #11
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    I am guessing that the absence of lines has something to do with getting the pilots on and off, but that would worry me in rough seas.
    Yoive never seen a pilot boat before? I think the discussion here is about electric power. Pilot boats dont have fences around them, for the reason you correctly guess. The term Red Herring comes to mind.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    One of my many duties when I lived in Longyearbyen was to be a pilot boat coxswain. This is Elling Carlsen, a pilot boat that was specifically built for Arctic duty on Svalbard and on which I have crewed.


    It is correct that there is no rail on a pilot boat. There are at two very good reasons for this:
    - The pilot must be able to get easily on and off the pilot boat, and a rail would get in the way
    - When you come alongside a ship in heavy seas, a rail would very quickly be bent and destroyed by the rolling action.

    The aluminum Hadrian rail that the pilot and assistant clip into when going on deck is clearly visible along the superstructure. The sliding cars with lifelines attached can be seen at the aft end of the rail. There is always an assistant on deck when the pilot embarks or disembarks a ship.

    An electric powered pilot boat makes very good sense for pilot stations where the transits to the embarkation/disembarkation points are fairly short. I believe there are quite a few harbors worldwide that fall into that category. And very few are like Svalbard, where the furthest I had to go to drop off a pilot was 90 nautical miles - one way!

    I am not sure those panels on the front of the superstructure are solar panels. It would make a lot more sense to put some windows there to give the operator a view of the sky and to help him see whatever is happening above him.
    Bundin er bátleysur mađur

  13. #13
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    CW, the non-skid surfaces on the decks of pilot boats is all that and more. Plus, in cold climates, the decks and handrails are heated to prevent icing.
    Sounds good. The look still makes me uncomfortable, but it seems it's all thought through.

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Yoive never seen a pilot boat before? I think the discussion here is about electric power. Pilot boats dont have fences around them, for the reason you correctly guess. The term Red Herring comes to mind.
    Several terms come to my mind, too.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Oyvind Snibsoer View Post

    I am not sure those panels on the front of the superstructure are solar panels. It would make a lot more sense to put some windows there to give the operator a view of the sky and to help him see whatever is happening above him.
    Which makes a lot of sense when you are coming up alongside a much taller, heavier, and longer vessel than your own. Being able to look up at it gives you more info than staring at the waterline
    "If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito"

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  15. #15
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    The M/F Ampere



    This has a similar sized power plant to the electric pilot boat. It draws charge for a few minutes from each port stop while loading and unloading. The charge has to come from on-shore batteries because the local power grid can't support bursts of 1.2MW for direct charging. Instead these are charged slowly at all times. And it runs so much more quietly. This is amazing.
    Will

  16. #16
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Quote Originally Posted by Oyvind Snibsoer View Post
    One of my many duties when I lived in Longyearbyen was to be a pilot boat coxswain. This is Elling Carlsen, a pilot boat that was specifically built for Arctic duty on Svalbard and on which I have crewed.


    It is correct that there is no rail on a pilot boat. There are at two very good reasons for this:
    - The pilot must be able to get easily on and off the pilot boat, and a rail would get in the way
    - When you come alongside a ship in heavy seas, a rail would very quickly be bent and destroyed by the rolling action.

    The aluminum Hadrian rail that the pilot and assistant clip into when going on deck is clearly visible along the superstructure. The sliding cars with lifelines attached can be seen at the aft end of the rail. There is always an assistant on deck when the pilot embarks or disembarks a ship.

    An electric powered pilot boat makes very good sense for pilot stations where the transits to the embarkation/disembarkation points are fairly short. I believe there are quite a few harbors worldwide that fall into that category. And very few are like Svalbard, where the furthest I had to go to drop off a pilot was 90 nautical miles - one way!

    I am not sure those panels on the front of the superstructure are solar panels. It would make a lot more sense to put some windows there to give the operator a view of the sky and to help him see whatever is happening above him.
    Another consideration, an observation, having been on and off several freighters from pilot boats, is that the "rails" need to be far enough back so there is no possibility of being crushed between those rails and the side of the ship when coming alongside in heavy waves.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Ninety miles, one way, to drop off a pilot. In Arctic waters. In a boat that is maybe 15 metres LOA.

    OK, you win the 'hairy-chested seaman' award...
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: electric pilot boat

    Thanks, Oyvind.

    Did you ever see this kind of pilot boarding during your time of service?




    Hey CW... d'ya think they applied non-skid to the ice before he boarded? The gangplank rails are high!


    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

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