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Thread: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

  1. #1
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    Default Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Stumbled upon this:
    http://www.donsmaps.com/canoedesigns.html



    There are lines and offsetts as well.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #2
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Nice find.

    Nick

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Very cool......Thanks

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Absolutely
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
    -The Dude-

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Easy..... First, get a really big log. Next, carve away everything that doesn't look like part of one of these beautiful canoes. A bit of paint and maybe a little decorative carving and you're done!

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Bradshaw View Post
    Easy..... First, get a really big log. Next, carve away everything that doesn't look like part of one of these beautiful canoes. A bit of paint and maybe a little decorative carving and you're done!
    Actually, I think you skipped a step. Often the hollowed-out log was softened with hot water and steam, then spread to a beam wider than the diameter of the log!

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    some of those traditional canoes were in the order of 50 feet long......
    Captain Voss Tilikum was 38 feet long. He picked it up and converted it for voyaging raising the sides and putting a long shallow ballast keel along the bottom.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Quote Originally Posted by runswithsizzers View Post
    Actually, I think you skipped a step. Often the hollowed-out log was softened with hot water and steam, then spread to a beam wider than the diameter of the log!
    That's how it was done over here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kW7BdhOZZ_c but we don't have the diameters you have.

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student, a rigger apprentice and Journeyman http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Quote Originally Posted by runswithsizzers View Post
    Actually, I think you skipped a step. Often the hollowed-out log was softened with hot water and steam, then spread to a beam wider than the diameter of the log!
    That is discussed in the Donsmaps linked piece.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Canoe designs of the First Nations of the Pacific Northwest

    Quote Originally Posted by gilberj View Post
    some of those traditional canoes were in the order of 50 feet long......
    Captain Voss Tilikum was 38 feet long. He picked it up and converted it for voyaging raising the sides and putting a long shallow ballast keel along the bottom.
    How long till one of you Left Coast blokes bangs together a Tilikum II and pops in on the R2AK with it?

    come on son, you folks got to step it up!... just sayin'

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