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Thread: Chain saw

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    931

    Default Re: Chain saw

    What you wont find on youtube is the guy who had 15 plus years working in the woods that dropped a 20 inch hemlock within inches of where he expected it to fall. What he didnt expect was the small sapling that got bent over and snapped and whipped back with enough force to crush his skull despite the hard hat and full face chip shield.

    Chainsaws and the work we do them is as dangerous as it gets. Scariest tools I own and use, hands down, bar none.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,145

    Default Re: Chain saw

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    What you wont find on youtube is the guy who had 15 plus years working in the woods that dropped a 20 inch hemlock within inches of where he expected it to fall. What he didnt expect was the small sapling that got bent over and snapped and whipped back with enough force to crush his skull despite the hard hat and full face chip shield.

    Chainsaws and the work we do them is as dangerous as it gets. Scariest tools I own and use, hands down, bar none.
    For sure.

    I recently attended a couple of saw certification/re-evaluation clinics (one for crosscut, one for chainsaw) with the US Forest Service. The guys that presented the chainsaw program have tons of experience both in commercial logging and firefighting. They will tell you that while tree felling certainly has its hazards, it's the "little" stuff that most often gets you; the spring poles, the burnt out stump hole, the misread binds in a jackstraw pile or root-ball situation, the unseen stob under a log being bucked that grabs you when the log starts rolling down the hill ... and so on.


    Added FWIW in the interest of promoting safety:

    The USFS is seeing an increase in reports of chainsaw 'fuel geysering' incidents and injuries, i.e. pressurized fuel tanks being opened near an ignition source resulting in burns. All reported geysering events resulting in injury involved Stihl chainsaws and the Forest Service has suspended their purchase of Stihl chainsaws.

    Be careful where and how you open those fuel tanks, and not just chainsaws.
    Last edited by J P; 05-16-2018 at 03:49 PM.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    New jersey
    Posts
    2,959

    Default Re: Chain saw

    That’s it. Craigslist here I come. One slightly used chainsaw.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,145

    Default Re: Chain saw

    Quote Originally Posted by Boater14 View Post
    Thatís it. Craigslist here I come. One slightly used chainsaw.
    Crosscut convert? Lighter, quieter, burns calories. Sharpening is a bit more involved than filing a chain though.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    14,846

    Default Re: Chain saw

    Im sawing up some maples I had taken down last fall, paid $1600 just to drop them .
    I fill a small truck load a day, 1/3 cord per load. Crazy dangerous work, thousands of small branches to trip over or the chain to snatch and either pull me into or throw at me.
    Still, I fear my table saw more .

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    24,836

    Default Re: Chain saw

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Im sawing up some maples I had taken down last fall, paid $1600 just to drop them .
    I fill a small truck load a day, 1/3 cord per load. Crazy dangerous work, thousands of small branches to trip over or the chain to snatch and either pull me into or throw at me.
    Still, I fear my table saw more .
    Don't you cut away all the little stuff first? That's the safest way to do it - but yes, it takes a little longer. I want my saw in a nice open, visible spot.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    9

    Default Re: Chain saw

    You can use a file, but I use a Dremel kit with a chainsaw sharpening attachment.
    It's fast, it's easy and it's not too expensive.
    I have about 5 chains and can sharpen any one in a split second.
    I haven't noticed any lack of performance in the chains.
    One thing I do though is keep 3 extra sharpening/grinding stones just in case.
    Last edited by JonWalter; 06-08-2018 at 02:41 AM.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    16,422

    Default Re: Chain saw

    Have any of you tried the carbide chainsaw blades? They are expensive but boy do they stay sharp for a long time. I bought one to cut Durisol Blocks which are made from cement with recycled wood as the aggregate. After building the whole Durisol Block house it still cut wood like butta. Sadly the dust from the blocks killed the Husky electric chainsaw I was using.

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