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Thread: Preserving strip location on planks

  1. #1
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    Default Preserving strip location on planks

    Hey, Iím solving one problem at a time on my first strip canoe build. Next step is ripping strips. Seems most folks mark the end of the board before ripping, so the strips can be reassembled in the original order.

    Why do folks take care to maintain the location of a strip in the plank ? Is it so that when the strips are being installed, color transitions are somewhat gradual ?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Quote Originally Posted by Akpaddler View Post
    Hey, I’m solving one problem at a time on my first strip canoe build. Next step is ripping strips. Seems most folks mark the end of the board before ripping, so the strips can be reassembled in the original order.

    Why do folks take care to maintain the location of a strip in the plank ? Is it so that when the strips are being installed, color transitions are somewhat gradual ?
    Yes, it makes for a nicely matched appearance if the topsides are to be finished bright. Also, by keeping the grain orientation and strip placement as close to the strips original position in the stock, I expect the rate of expansion and contraction of the strips will be more uniform and the rate of expansion and contraction will tend to be more equal over a given area. That is, of course, probably a consideration only for the very finickey.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    It is because they are anal retentive. Perfection is the enemy of good. There is a middle ground between random strips and square edges and meticulously matched quarter sawn cove and bead strips. Choose the level of finish and think about how hard you want to work and now much time you want to lavish on a work of art, or boat.

    Make a pile of strips, then make a boat. You will have been on the water all summer before they begin to apply the glass. I have knocked out a decent looking Rushton UGO stripper in 40-60 hours, lofting not included. It looked pretty decent, but there were staple holes and some light leaks.

    I suspect that the UGO shape is easier to strip than most, which made planking go more quickly than some others I have made. It is my impression that Rushton ran a production shop and did not build a shape that required his workers to fight with the wood. I don't know if they did it intentionally, but I think that they had a feel for the materials they used.

    I would rather be in the boat looking at the scenery, than examining the surface for tiny imperfections.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Lots of different ways to do a boat.
    Those who are "anal retentive" are people too.

    Workboat, good enough, too ugly to do anything other than paint, pretty, or a piece of furniture fit for a museum.

    Choose what you want. Or just get on with the first one (since you will make mistakes) and make the second one better.

    But book matching the strips helps with the pretty or better look.

    Have you checked out Nick Schade's web site?
    Here is an example of the best looking end of the scale.
    http://www.woodenkayaks.com/gallery/image-galleries/gallery-handmade-wooden-boats/microbootlegger#



  5. #5
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    It's so easy to do, why not?

    I often see doors or table tops or interior wood paneling etc. where there are VG boards stuck in right next to FG boards. That really bothers me, every time.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    I never spend too much time keeping strips in the order they came off the board, but i think it's well worth keeping each board together. I like to have broad bands of color, as opposed to random strips; and strips from the same board are usually alike. It just involves bundling each set from the saw, then to the planer and again twice for bead and cove. I use masking tape or little velcro strips from the plant store used to tie up tomatoes and such.
    rgds

    Rick
    oysterbayboats.ca

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    If you feel obliged to keep the strips orderly, just make a witness mark (aka marriage mark) with a marking knife on the edge of the flitch that you're going to rip into strips (e.g. the side that the saw blade will be coming through). A simple "V" is probably sufficient, plus maybe a mark to identify which flitch it came from. The mark needs to run across the line of cut, from edge to edge. After you get all the strips out of a flitch, reassemble it according to the witness mark and tape the bundle together with blue tape until you need it.

    Myself, and especially if I planned on a bright hull, I'd worry about matching color and grain rather than worrying to much about what strip was next to another in the flitch. Not that the two things are completely unrelated.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. ó P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Yah, I know it’s not hard to mark & keep orderly. Just started thinking to myself, I better figure out why !!!

    Thanks everybody

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    You might want to go to Nick Schade's forum and talk to guys who do this all the time and professionally.
    Look up old threads on the subject.
    You didn't say if you went to see his site with videos about strip building.
    http://www.kayakforum.com/cgi-bin/Building/index.cgi

  10. #10

    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Or buy his book there is a chapter on book matching strips if memory serves

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    The videos represent his later thinking on how to build a kayak. There has been some change.
    The books were written early in his career.
    His responses to the various threads are actually the very latest.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    I have seen all manner of hull aesthetics on strip canoes. Some people book match, some just color match, some use inlays, some even intermingle quarter sawn with flat sawn strips. Do what pleases you, beauty is in what you want. There will always be critics.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    The books were early but they do lay out several valid methods for book matching such as swapping every other plank to reverse the grain pattern (looks quite interesting)

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Quote Originally Posted by upchurchmr View Post
    Those who are "anal retentive" are people too.
    Yes, and those people can be such snoots as they sneer at the staple holes. My point was that you should know your options and that you will have to deal with opinions. If you chose a less labor intensive, less perfect on close inspection construction there are some people who will feel obliged to criticize. Of course, if you make the perfect thing of beauty, someone else will criticize you. Let them have their fun. Make the best choice for yourself and ignore the critics, myself included if you like.
    Quote Originally Posted by cut3times View Post
    I have seen all manner of hull aesthetics on strip canoes. Some people book match, some just color match, some use inlays, some even intermingle quarter sawn with flat sawn strips. Do what pleases you, beauty is in what you want. There will always be critics.
    Ah, the diplomatic version.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  15. #15

    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    You know it’s funny I frequent a few what I will call male clothing message boards where people discuss clothing styles and what to wear (and you thought boat builders were bad you should try that group) and it seems many people’s biggest fear choosing clothes is what others will think of them. Many men would like to, shall we call it, upgrade their wardrobe from jeans and tees to chinos and sports jackets but don’t out of concern their friends will think they are “putting on airs” or some such nonsense.

    I, taking people at their word, tended to think the modern trend of wear what you want actually meant that and if I want a sports jacket for wearing to Walmart that’s what I do even if am the only one. In other words if you go through life trying to please others no one will be happy. Put the level of effort into it you want and let the naysayers be damned

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Several years back, somebody was at the Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival with a line of CLC designed stitch-and-tape sea kayaks that he was finishing by shooting with Dupont Imron (now Axalta Imron) automotive 2-part. Stuff is incredibly tough and glossy. Comes in a veritable rainbow of colors.

    Don't have to worry too much about matching the wood if you shoot the stripper with that stuff -- red metalflake canoe anyone?
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. ó P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    I've always admired the way kayak and canoe builders can manipulate the materials and their skills to make what I'd consider 'art'.


    Just like a restored classic car, it can make you stare with jaw agap in wonder.



    Would I ever pick up this piece of "fine china" and actually put it into anything else but a body of filtered and temperature controlled water with shores made of sponge rubber (indoors by the way to avoid UV exposure)? No way.



    I'd be afraid to even think about it. They'd be the equivalent of a "trailer queen" in my world.. made just to be viewed, an idealized version of someone's thoughts of what "perfection" are.


    I use canoes to go fishing and transport gear to and from campgrounds, and general horsing around with the kids (sinking each other with thrown buckets of water...) I'm clumsy so a book-matched, grain-matched stripper would just be glassed and painted over for me to value it's utility.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    Perhaps it would be worth your while to lay out a few samples and see what you like the most.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Preserving strip location on planks

    I have built several cedar strippers and always book matched the strips. When there is little color variation within the board, the effect is too subtle to notice, and possibly not worth the effort. But I have seen beautiful 'flame' patterns in strippers built from colorful boards.

    More recently, I have come to believe that it is much more practical to PAINT cedar strippers rather than varnish them, which allows for a lot more latitude in materials, building effort, and greatly reduces maintenance.

    If you happen to have some very colorful boards, then by all means, book match and varnish - but if your wood is bland, or requires a lot of scarfs, or if you are going to "Make a pile of strips, then make a boat" then seriously, consider just painting it.

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