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Thread: pilot coble

  1. #36
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    The Leslie was a Sunderland foyboat all of which had Northumberland lines. the oars were made in the late 60's and not of the era I mentioned.

    The comment on the picture was meant to be humorous in future I will avoid when conversing with you.

    I am surprised that you interpret my remarks on the scarph as meaning no fastenings were in that area. Good Heavens that would leave the bile to slip out side ways.

    Another common mistake was the way the handgrips were scooped out.

    I emphasise again we are discussing oar design in the Victorian era some of which were still in use in the 40's

  2. #37
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    The Leslie was a Sunderland foyboat all of which had Northumberland lines. the oars were made in the late 60's and not of the era I mentioned.

    The comment on the picture was meant to be humorous in future I will avoid when conversing with you.
    ??? which picture?

    I am surprised that you interpret my remarks on the scarph as meaning no fastenings were in that area. Good Heavens that would leave the bile to slip out side ways.

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    A square end nibbed into the clogg, just like a square hood end nailed into a rebate, will be as strong or stronger than a scarf as there is more wood to hold the nails in the swash.
    Like I said regional differences. Your bit of coast used a scarf, on the Tees it was square ended.
    Never implied no nails, just thin wood for the nails to bear against.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #38
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    [QUOTE=PeterSibley;5537117]A whole new meaning "lying down on the job"![/QUOTE]#30

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    I was looking at that picture and thought I wonder if one of the men standing aft was saying
    " I think I f we hung a plank over the stern and hinged it we could steer from here and get rid of those two"

    I notice the for'd two are lying on a plank, are they attempting to hide it?
    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    ??? which picture?




    Never implied no nails, just thin wood for the nails to bear against.


    I am unable to conquer the mysteries of getting photo's on site since PB pulled the plug. I think my description as (scarph) may be misleading Nick.

    The blade runs along and up the bile where it terminates at the top it can be as "thick" as you wish, but instead of cutting "square" a cut is introduced at an angle sloping from the outside leading edge upward into the body of the bile giving a bearing surface preventing nails or whatever "springing".

    I'll mention again that another common mistake in the more modern made oars is the side the scoops are made for the hand grips.

    Remember I did emphasise that we are not as dependant on oars as we were in the past encouraging the idea "That'll do" which it will but not in the period I'm referring to.


    Having worked on salmon drift/fixed engines and having to manoeuvre extensively you get the "feel" and this can result in looking at them and realising why they developed into the perhaps peculiar shape they are.
    Last edited by Chippie; 04-17-2018 at 03:59 AM.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post

    I am unable to conquer the mysteries of getting photo's on site since PB pulled the plug. I think my description as (scarph) may be misleading Nick.

    The blade runs along and up the bile where it terminates at the top it can be as "thick" as you wish, but instead of cutting "square" a cut is introduced at an angle sloping from the outside leading edge upward into the body of the bile giving a bearing surface preventing nails or whatever "springing".

    I'll mention again that another common mistake in the more modern made oars is the side the scoops are made for the hand grips.

    Remember I did emphasise that we are not as dependant on oars as we were in the past encouraging the idea "That'll do" which it will but not in the period I'm referring to.


    Having worked on salmon drift/fixed engines and having to manoeuvre extensively you get the "feel" and this can result in looking at them and realising why they developed into the perhaps peculiar shape they are.
    Now I see said the blind man. Not a scarf so much as a locking nibbed end.
    Like the nibbed ends on this scarf
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #40
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    https://sites.google.com/site/shipwr...RN-ScarfJoints



    As an apprentice I was taught to treat all splices in this manner.

    The reason for one example was because in those days large boats and ships were framed out and a ribband was erected around the shell line to hold the tops in place, this of course had to assume the shape of the ship at that level line. Obviously the ends of the scarphs would try to "escape" and tapering prevented this.

    That principle was extended to a whole raft of situations so it was exceptional to create a scarph any other way as it suited almost all structural work.

    Hence me harping on about it.

    Had typed this earlier and had to leave Nick this form of construction always kept the "face" in line after dressing off as it couldn't go anywhere.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    I like making oars, thought that I might be able to help so looked at the thread title and clicked on it, but when I saw the boats figured that you'd be able to "coble" something together.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    Respect gentlemen, cloggs and swash's - fantastic stuff. Love it!
    Philip K. Dick 'Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away'.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: pilot coble

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    A whole new meaning "lying down on the job"!
    It appears that that narrowboat has about two feet clearance on each side.

    See, I can be a smartarse too.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

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