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Thread: Bilge stripping process

  1. #1
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    Default Bilge stripping process

    The bilge in my new ts16 is quite sad. To sand is impossible as there are many nooks and crannies.

    I had intended to strip using paint stripper pushing it into the gaps, scrape, jet wash clean, allow to dry, sand where I can then treat with rot stopper: http://homesafeproducts.co.nz/produc...-stop-the-rot/

    Finally a combination of brushing and spray painting to ensure almost complete coverage.

    What are people's thoughts on this process?

    Also at the risk of getting lynched I have experimented before with water-based paint: Sealer, topcoat then clear varnish. Looks good and has lasted 9 months in constant weather (not immersed) so far. 3 coats of each. The boat would spend maybe 20-25 days a year in the water if I'm really lucky.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Heat gun and a variety of scrapers, even if you have to shape a few yourself. You’ll find you can get into anywhere on a TS16 one way or another - there really aren’t any difficult nooks and crannies (on my TS16 anyway) that will cause you any real difficulty and it’s an almost pleasant experience once you get going. The biggest difficulty may be your own level of nimbleness and flexibility in some spaces but drag a bit of ply through to sit and lay on and it’ll be "a little" more comfortable.

    You’ll find using stripper and a pressure wash inside the TS16 cabin to be a complete bugger of a job - I know, I’ve been there and done just what you are about to do. (Every frame, every corner and every nook will spit water, paint and chemicals back at you at every conceivable angle so you’ll need a full set of waterproofs and goggles to try and deal with it)
    Last edited by Larks; 04-13-2018 at 04:28 AM.
    Larks

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    If the hull and bilge can be at least partially filled ...very hot water and a few kgs of caustic soda left for as long as the paint cripples. It will totally de grease and kill any bugs and mould, and can be safely drained or pumped out onto land with loads of water, and then pressure wash. Caustic will eat aluminium and soften urea and cascamite type glues though.
    'C'est la vie' say the old folks it goes to show you never can tell

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Quote Originally Posted by Larks View Post
    Heat gun and a variety of scrapers...
    I will try a heat gun. I've used one before and they are good. The only problem I have found is where there is glass, the heat softens it and the scraper damages the surface. This was on a boat which has only been partly glassed so I was hitting bits before I realised it was there, and was then too late. Academic because I don't believe there's any glass on this boat, but should you be using a heat gun on a GOP boat?

    As for the stripper, just to humour me would the process I described be harmful to be boat do you think?

    I am thinking it might take a combination of approaches.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Quote Originally Posted by jonboy View Post
    If the hull and bilge can be at least partially filled ...very hot water and a few kgs of caustic soda left for as long as the paint cripples. It will totally de grease and kill any bugs and mould, and can be safely drained or pumped out onto land with loads of water, and then pressure wash. Caustic will eat aluminium and soften urea and cascamite type glues though.
    Interesting, never heard of this method. It would be easy enough to dump my entire hot water storage cylinder into the bilge, but it wouldn't fill the whole thing. Although if it only does part of it, turning a tap on and opening a bung is a lot less effort than heat guns and solvents. Do you know the proper ratio of soda to water?

    My concern is that I don't know what glue has been used and don't imagine it's easy to tell? I guess a test batch would be the way to go but imagine how gutted you'd be if you returned after an hour to find all the glue had disappeared

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    A kilo of caustic soda crystals in 20 litres of hot water will make the water violently boil. the resultant solution will strip paint and degrease metal in minutes. Once the boiling has subsided its relatively easy to handle but still dangerous to your eyes and skin. You don't need to fill the boat if you can gently rock it to and fro. excuse my ignorance ..I'm assuming a ts 16 is 16 ft sailing dinghy and GOP is what exactly.. glass over ply?..you said new.. does it really need such drastic bilge treatment.? If it is a known craft and new, it should be easy to find out the constuction materials.

    I cleaned the entire bilge of a Montague whaler 27', double carvel and a big inbord diesel, with no chemicals or stripper but some strong detergente and a serious non-hobby pressure washer I hired for the day.. the force of the washer alone stripped the scabbiest paint áreas and ripped out chunks of the wood that was the slightest bit soft and rotten.
    'C'est la vie' say the old folks it goes to show you never can tell

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Quote Originally Posted by jonboy View Post
    A kilo of caustic soda...
    Yes it's a small trailer sailer: http://sailboatdata.com/viewrecord.asp?class_id=4233

    Yes GOP is glass over ply. I don't think this boat is glassed anywhere, I was just mentioning it as an issue I'd had with heat previously. Sorry I should stay on topic.

    I meant new to me, it's old and somewhat neglected. It had a bad paint job on top of old paint.

    I have a pressure washer that would remove paint if you let it. Maybe I give that a go first, then see how it looks. I was worried about forcing water into cracks and damaging the timber with the pressure? With luck a scrub with detergent and she might be good to paint.

    I don't actually *need* to strip completely, just getting back to something sound that will take a sealer is fine.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    I wouldn't use a solution in my boat that would be hazardous to health in it's application. Machine dish washer detergents are caustic soda in a diluted form. They would probably be safe to use.

    Complete flushing and neutralization will be required to get any finish to adhere afterward.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    I wouldn't use a solution in my boat that would be hazardous to health in it's application. Machine dish washer detergents are caustic soda in a diluted form. They would probably be safe to use.

    Complete flushing and neutralization will be required to get any finish to adhere afterward.
    I would prefer to avoid harmful chemicals.

    I agree, getting rid of residue would be an issue. Previously I've used meths (for water based paint) and epoxy thinner (for epoxy). Not sure if this is correct but seems to work.

    Sounds like the easiest option so far is cranking up the water blaster and getting rid of the loose stuff like that?

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    I'd agree, go with that least invasive method... the whaler I mentioned had fifty years of all sorts of grolly and ****e congealed and a hundred coats of dodgy paint.

    Go for a thorough pressure clean, not too intense, rinse and tip it over to drain and tip it back to air dry ... no alternative to a bit of elbow grease, but we aren't talking a forty -footer here

    let us know how it goes
    'C'est la vie' say the old folks it goes to show you never can tell

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Check on Dry Ice blasting in your area. It leaves no residure, gets into cracks and crannys and does not damage the wood.
    Jay

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    A lot of overkill suggested here! You really only need to sand off any loose paint and make sure all surfaces are roughened up. So, strong detergent and leave it on for a while. Wash it all with your small water blaster and scrubbing brush and let it all dry. Then use a combination of sanding by hand and sanding annoying corners with a multitool - use one with dust extraction for an easier and better job, and a scraper. Vacuum thoroughly. Paint it with a really good primer then finish coats. You only need to take it back to bare timber if you have rot or intend to glass it (I wouldn't try glassing the interior of a TS 16). I only use oil-based paints on my boats but I don't know whether or not there are suitable water-based paints. Great if there are!

    Rick

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    You can also use a steam generator to strip paint quite effectively. Even a pretty modest steam generator like this Earlex (https://www.highlandwoodworking.com/...generator.aspx) should do the trick. You might have to fabricate the right sort of specialized nozzle to suit your application.

    But certainly a lot less...exciting than a heat gun. It likely will raise the grain a bit, though.

    http://historichomeworks.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=133

    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    I think I'll go for the pressure wash in the first instance, then attack any stubborn bits with heat or stripper. After that a degrease and sand, should be good to go.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Quote Originally Posted by chrisb79 View Post
    I think I'll go for the pressure wash in the first instance, then attack any stubborn bits with heat or stripper. After that a degrease and sand, should be good to go.

    Promise to take a selfie when you’re done with the pressure wash?
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

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  16. #16
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    Default Re: Bilge stripping process

    Chemical strippers and surfaces with lots of nooks and crannies are a sure recipe for trouble when you try to apply the next coat of paint..


    Really.
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

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