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Thread: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

  1. #1
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    Default Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    Getting ready to start stripping this weekend. Tried to review material on how to quarter saw, an otherwise flat sawn board. And realized, it was not mentioned in the books on strip canoes that I had. !!! !

    Went to youtube, watched a few videos on how to rip strips put out by some boat shops, and they just seemed to be stripping a flat sawn board.

    Why did I think it was so advantageous to quarter saw cedar strips ?

    Is it worth the trouble to rip 3/4 strips, turn on end, and rip 1/4 strips ?

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    So long as the wood stays dry it's only a matter of personal taste.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    No... unless it's a certain aesthetic you're after for a bright-finished hull.

    In fact, for strip building, plain sawn has one advantage - it'll bend around the curves easier, and stay fairer, than quarter-sawn.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    We just had this discussion a couple of weeks ago, specifically in regards to strip building, go back through the very recent archive.

    edit to add:

    Here ya go:

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...or-strip-canoe
    Last edited by SMARTINSEN; 04-12-2018 at 02:25 PM.
    Steve Martinsen

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    Smartinsen, i appreciate directing me to the links without a well deserved finger wagging for not checking the archives before posting a question to the forum.

    The thread you referenced strayed into moister content.

    I hope to repurpose some old wooden water pipe made of cypress. (Not sure how flexable it will be). This is old water pipe, been sitting outside in the Alaska freeze/thaw for 40 odd years. Had a tar type of outside coating.

    All things being equal, any guess if the moister content would tend to be on the dry side or the moist side?
    No way to guess?
    Last edited by Akpaddler; 04-12-2018 at 09:17 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    Quarter saw actually splits easier than flat sawn. It looks great for bright work like decks and guitar tops, but there is no real advantage to using it in a hull.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Quarter saw actually splits easier than flat sawn. It looks great for bright work like decks and guitar tops, but there is no real advantage to using it in a hull.
    I hear this often, but it's not been the case for me that VG WRC splits any more easily than FG, and I've used mountains of each. Also, VG is much more stable than FG or SG, which can be quite important in a hull that experiences wet and dry cycles. VG shrinks and swells in thickness, FG and SG in width, so with VG the seams don't open as much when the planking dries out.

    I like VG much better for appearance, and what I like the least appearance wise is a mix of VG and FG, which looks sloppy to me.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Akpaddler View Post
    Smartinsen, i appreciate directing me to the links without a well deserved finger wagging for not checking the archives before posting a question to the forum.

    The thread you referenced strayed into moister content.

    I hope to repurpose some old wooden water pipe made of cypress. (Not sure how flexable it will be). This is old water pipe, been sitting outside in the Alaska freeze/thaw for 40 odd years. Had a tar type of outside coating.

    All things being equal, any guess if the moister content would tend to be on the dry side or the moist side?
    No way to guess?
    Alaskan Cypress is most likely Alaskan Yellow Cedar (AYC), yes?

    You'll find that it's noticeably heavier than WRC.

    As for moisture content if it's outdoors it will be too damp for the job, especially if you use flat grain, but that won't be a problem if you rip out the strips and store them in a heated building for a month or so, especially if it's vertical grain because it dries faster than flat or slash grain.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Is quarter sawn meaningful for a strip canoe ?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    I hear this often, but it's not been the case for me that VG WRC splits any more easily than FG, and I've used mountains of each. Also, VG is much more stable than FG or SG, which can be quite important in a hull that experiences wet and dry cycles. VG shrinks and swells in thickness, FG and SG in width, so with VG the seams don't open as much when the planking dries out.

    I like VG much better for appearance, and what I like the least appearance wise is a mix of VG and FG, which looks sloppy to me.
    I grew up around WRC also, starting when my older brother worked after school hand-splitting shingles & shakes with a mallet & froe. I've used a ton of it for hardscaping, boatbuilding, and architectural millwork. Its rot-resistance makes it good for marine applications. It's pretty stable, which makes it a good candidate for a strip canoe. And it's gorgeous stuff, finished bright, if such is your desire.

    But I have to disagree a bit about the splitting. Cedar has a funny attitude toward splitting. It'll take a nail without splitting pretty well. As much because of its softness (give) as because of any inherent resistance to splitting. Same with a screw, though a bit of gentleness is helpful there. OTOH - anyone who has spent time with a mallet & froe can tell you that cedar WILL split - and quite readily - with the right persuasion. And its straight grain helps with that (and results in nice even-thickness shakes). It will split across the grain (resulting in vertical-grain shakes) or with the grain. But easier with the grain... any day of the week. And putting a fastener into a piece that it true, absolute 90 degree, vertical grain stock is - in my experience - definitely more likely to cause a split. At the same time, it doesn't take much of a bias, which leads to fasteners crossing the grain a bit or a lot, to dampen that tendency.

    Such has been my experience. YMMV
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

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