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Thread: Shackleton's Endurance

  1. #1
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    Default Shackleton's Endurance

    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    I have a wonderful photo book of all the b/w photos the ship's photographer took during her ordeal and managed to save. Beautiful, compelling, frightening images.
    Gerard>
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    I read that book while nestled under a stack of quilts in a 40 year old Airstream.

    It felt right.
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Last year I stood in the town square in Punta Arenas looking up at the window of the office where Shackleton planned the rescue of his men. Walked out to the Nao Victoria maritime museum and put my hands on the replica James Caird, looked over the very detailed scale model of the steam trawler that he chartered to go down to Elephant Island to pick them up. It brought home the sheer scale of what he achieved, and that it was not so long ago. Very sobering to think of.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Scantlings! - nothing scant about this...
    Though her hull looked from the outside like that of any other vessel of a comparable size, it was not. She was designed for polar conditions with a very sturdy construction. Her keel members were four pieces of solid oak, one above the other, adding up to a thickness of 85 inches (2,200 mm), while its sides were between 30 inches (760 mm) and 18 inches (460 mm) thick, with twice as many frames as normal and the frames being of double thickness. She was built of planks of oak and Norwegian fir up to 30 inches (760 mm) thick, sheathed in greenheart, a notably strong and heavy wood. The bow, which would meet the ice head-on, had been given special attention. Each timber had been made from a single oak tree chosen for its shape so that its natural shape followed the curve of the ship's design. When put together, these pieces had a thickness of 52 inches (1,300 mm).


    Shackleton looking overboard at Endurance being crushed by the ice

    Endurance final sinking November 1915
    Of her three masts, the forward one was square-rigged, while the after two carried fore and aft sails, like a schooner. As well as sails, Endurance had a 350 horsepower (260 kW) coal-fired steam engine capable of speeds up to 10.2 knots (18.9 km/h; 11.7 mph).
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  6. #6
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Planking 30 inches thick???

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Quote Originally Posted by lupussonic View Post
    Planking 30 inches thick???
    You should visit Discovery https://www.rrsdiscovery.com/about-discovery/
    She too is massive.
    Last edited by Peerie Maa; 04-05-2018 at 03:16 PM.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  8. #8
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    I just finished "The Terror" about Franklin and "The Erebus" and "The Terror" and the descriptions of the construction of both gees very closely to this information.

    Tough men, fer sure.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Saw a touring collection of the Endurance photos at the U. of Washington years ago. Fascinating story.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Hull form. The conventional wisdom has been that she was crushed because of her slab sides. Fram, granted a different kettle of fish, had round bilges and rose out of the ice in the pressure waves of the pack.

    A favorite story of mine, Shackleton.

    A ditty of the day:

    For speed and efficiency, Amundsen. For science, Scott. But when the chips are down, and it looks like curtains, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton.

  11. #11
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    Default Shackleton's Endurance

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Pless View Post
    Not a very good section for a vessel designed to be trapped in the ice. No way no how the ice pressure squirts her up. She just gets [inevitably] crushed.
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  12. #12
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Quote Originally Posted by ishmael View Post
    Hull form. The conventional wisdom has been that she was crushed because of her slab sides. Fram, granted a different kettle of fish, had round bilges and rose out of the ice in the pressure waves of the pack.

    A favorite story of mine, Shackleton.

    A ditty of the day:

    For speed and efficiency, Amundsen. For science, Scott. But when the chips are down, and it looks like curtains, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton.
    Reminds me of the winter we were frozen in in a canal with our ferrocement boat: The ice pushed us up and when cracks in the ice started it resonated in the boat. First a bit scary but we got used to it. Our kids were playing on the ice with sleds or skates and I did the 'Noorder Rondrit' , a tour on skates in the region, started around 8 in the morning, still dark, and 164 km later finished at 6, again in the dark.
    In Friesland, where I lived as a kid, they had the 11 cities tour, a bit longer, 220 km, and as boys we dreamed about doing that. When this tour was everbody went crazy, possibly also Bobbys forefathers.
    So I was glad I did this tour many years later.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    Could very well be. There were dogs on the ice until 1994. The kiwis were still using them actively when I was there in the late 70's to mid 80's. I'm sure there are still several dog sleds from that era scattered about.
    Quote Originally Posted by purri View Post
    I saw a dog sled in a naval museum here on Oz that claimed it was from an OZ/RN Antarctic expedition. Anyone?
    The best helping hand you will ever receive is the one at the end of your own arm.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Shackleton's Endurance

    The R/V Hero was built with round bilges for just this reason. I don't think she was ever really frozen in though. I know she wasn't when I was on her.
    Quote Originally Posted by ishmael View Post
    Hull form. The conventional wisdom has been that she was crushed because of her slab sides. Fram, granted a different kettle of fish, had round bilges and rose out of the ice in the pressure waves of the pack.

    A favorite story of mine, Shackleton.

    A ditty of the day:

    For speed and efficiency, Amundsen. For science, Scott. But when the chips are down, and it looks like curtains, get down on your knees and pray for Shackleton.
    The best helping hand you will ever receive is the one at the end of your own arm.

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