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Thread: Pressure treated planking

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Will anyone insure this boat when it's completed? I wonder what the disposal cost will be for a 41' boat 30 years from now. I know I wouldn't to be stuck with getting rid of a hulk that can't be sold.

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Carvel is much faster and longer lasting than the nightmare that you described. We have, several times replanked a yacht that had been in service for 75 to 100 years. The planking was good but the frames, floors and sometimes the keel was shot. They all came in on there own bottoms though. Crappy planking schemes is playing with your life, remember the Bounty, she had junk wood ply decks and they sent her to the Locker.

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    man, this thread is depressing.

    scott, I wish you the best of luck - it's clear to me you question was well intentioned. you're just following George's methodology. sure, big box PT lumber ... probably not the best choice, but II'm not sure why some chose to respond to you query so condescendingly. I'd probably just look for some nicer fir or pine considering the construction. finding a local mill ain't a bad idea either.

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by Dannybb55 View Post
    Carvel is much faster and longer lasting than the nightmare that you described. We have, several times replanked a yacht that had been in service for 75 to 100 years. The planking was good but the frames, floors and sometimes the keel was shot. They all came in on there own bottoms though. Crappy planking schemes is playing with your life, remember the Bounty, she had junk wood ply decks and they sent her to the Locker.
    How are YOU defining a "crappy planking scheme" ?

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Will anyone insure this boat when it's completed? I wonder what the disposal cost will be for a 41' boat 30 years from now. I know I wouldn't to be stuck with getting rid of a hulk that can't be sold.
    Have you lived your life with the focal point being 30 years away? How about he gets 30 years of use out of it then has to burn it? So what! He has already said he has no interest in resale value.

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by telenorth View Post
    man, this thread is depressing.

    scott, I wish you the best of luck - it's clear to me you question was well intentioned. you're just following George's methodology. sure, big box PT lumber ... probably not the best choice, but II'm not sure why some chose to respond to you query so condescendingly. I'd probably just look for some nicer fir or pine considering the construction. finding a local mill ain't a bad idea either.
    I tend to agree with the stronger-then-normal odor of the bilge permeating the air above decks.
    Capital punishment for a misdemeanor !? Yikes! He was just asking.

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    You know Bob, your a bad human being. A small, petty, divisive and arrogant human being.


    I finished reading your comments last night before bed and I’ll admit, I was mad. I initially composed a scathing response to your many insulting words in my head. That’ll show’em!


    But as I’ve come to learn, never say (or write) anything in anger. As adult men I believe our greatest strength should be to control our emotions. So I went to bed, next to my wife with the sounds of my kids laughing and talking with a visiting friend (sleep over Friday you know).


    So I’ll give you my response with a clear head. Bob, I feel bad for you. I truly do, and I’m sincerely sorry the path your life has taken that has made you the way you have become. I know it’s not what your parents wanted for you and we as a society should feel true empathy for people like you. We as a society should reach out to those who are so isolated, so bitter, so lonely and welcome them back to humanity.


    Life is good, people are good, try to remember a time when you believed that.


    I get it Bob, believe me. I’ve spent my entire adult life in a uniform of one kind or another. While I would hate to say I’ve done it all……theres no other way to say it though, I’ve done it all! I’ve seen humanity at its absolute worst. Primal, base, savagery inflicted by one human on another. I’ve also seen the depths of stupidity that could not be believed unless you were to observe it with your own eyes. People who’s complete lack of common sense or any semblance of situational awareness led to their untimely death or the death of another.


    When you work in that world it can easily consume you. The drugs, the booze, the violence. The constant conflict, anger and rage in your workplace. Now add to it the fact that you’re working nights, you’re not sleeping, moneys tight, kids are needy and little and the wife wants a vacation. It gets hard, real hard, real fast.


    It’s so easy to lose sight of all the good in the world, all the good in people. You have to work to not to believe that everyone is out to get you. Some guys just can’t do it, the light grows to dim to see and they remain in darkness. Lonely, bitter darkness.


    It’s not just for the people in a uniform. Life, circumstances, even being a wealthy lawyer can dim the light no matter how you make your living. You can’t see the light Bob, but I assure you it’s there.


    I never appreciated the quote that I’ll paraphrase from Mark Twain until I became the old man myself (sorta, I’m on facebook and that’s for old people). About how the teenager was incredulous at the old man’s ignorance when he left the house and how shocked to see how much the old man had learned in just a few short years when he returned.


    That was me! Not that specific, as there was no old man I thought a fool, I thought everyone not exactly like me was a fool.


    In my 20’s and most of my 30’s there wasn’t a course of action, personal choice or lifestyle that I could not find fault with. I mean it, I was a master poopooer of all things unfamiliar or different then how I saw the world. I was the smartest guy in every room. I fought bigger guys than me, shot guns and drove fast for a living. Whatever you were doing, you were doing it wrong. Trust me, just ask, I would set you straight.


    But you know Bob, I aint that smart. I aint that tough and it’s really none of my business what my neighbor does in his yard or bedroom. I realized how much I still had to learn, how much I missed out on because I already knew everything.


    I hurt people Bob. I isolated them, demeaned them and took them for granted because I knew it all and needed no one.


    Life always brings things into balance, it is the way of nature. When you live as I did and as you still do, one day it catches up to you. Nobody knows when, but it always catches you.


    I almost lost it all Bob, everything I loved, everything that was truly important became instantly clear. I won’t bore you with my all to common story, but my day of reckoning came and I had a choice to make.


    So I did.


    Live Bob. Dream, Learn, Do.


    I say it all the time. Lead people by positive example. I tell my men and my children continually that I want leaders in the field! Lead from the front with servant leadership. Put others before yourself and get the job done. That is not confined to the work place. Leadership can be anywhere. Church, the grocery store and even wooden boat building.


    Seek common ground and develop peoples interest into passions. There is enough sun for everyone. Cheer when people succeed, support them when they fail. You don’t need to “fix” it, You don’t need to do it for them, you need to make them believe it can be done and they can do it!


    This would not be an appropriate wooden boat post if I did not at least do a little shop talk so I’ll drop some knowledge on you.


    While on the one had it’s not fair to single you out Bob, because there were some others who were nearly as insulting, condescending and rude. Unfortunately you seized the prize for the most uncalled for behavior. So as we say in my world, you caught a ballgame.


    Despite what you say Bob, there is more than one way to build a boat. The particular process I’m speaking of, has been done, is being done with hundreds of examples on the sea today. My question was simply a materials question.


    I got some good responses about off gassing and interior appearance that I had not really thought of. Excellent points that have led me to believe I’ll just use the white oak that is widely available in my area. Pretty simple.


    That is what I hoped this forum would be like. A place where people with a common passion came together to solve problems and support one another. Not a digital playground where the most obnoxious, ignorant, blowhards shout down anyone who dares ask a question.


    You were not alone but among a few who spoke from a place of ignorance and assumption. Some insinuated that I would let this craft become a derelict eye sore when I was done with her. That it will be unrepairable, not sea worthy and quickly dissolve into dust. One even indicated I was the kind of person that gave wooden boats a bad name!


    Had any of you taken the time to ask a few more questions, or research the design or the project a little more you would know the kind of person I am. The methodical, logical, responsible person I am and how ridiculous those assumptions were.


    Many of you pass your opinions off as fact, with the scary thing being, to the uninitiated, that most of what you say is indeed opinion and just that.


    But to Bob and the others; it’s not fact. It is your opinion. Which of course you are entitled to, but don’t think the rest of us are fooled by some keyboard tough guys who are better at writing checks than swinging a hammer to achieve their wooden boat dreams.


    I tried to show appropriate respect for traditional methods because I truly do admire them, but they are just not for me. My project is not about trying to do it “cheap” “fast” or “easy”, it’s about a building concept that make sense to me. It’s an approach that allows me to get on the water in an acceptable amount of time, money and effort for me. Just me.


    I don’t know why that would be so offensive to anyone else.


    Shockingly, a few hundred million of us do not live on a coast having grown up with triple masted schooners (yeah I don’t know if that’s a thing but it sounded good) in daddy’s slip at your “summer place”. I thought I made it clear that this was simply a materials question, that I was not running out to do it one way or the other, just a question.


    I get it, you may not like this construction method, George Buehler or his designs, but I do. It also would have been fine for you to simply say, “I don’t like it, I wouldn’t do it”. But Bob, you chose to make it personal and insult me. To question my intelligence, work ethic and my due regard for the safety of my family.


    Who the hell are you?


    Obviously my time on the forum has come to an end. Equally obvious is it will be no great loss to the forum, I took more for the forum then I ever I gave. I’ll continue my project of course. I’ll write about, post about and make videos for YouTube because all of it is fun. It’s fun for me and I hope it’s fun for others and gets them off the couch and out into the shop. I hope it gets them off the computer, posting in some internet forum over 500 times a year and back into the real world. I hope it shows them the joy of building something with your own hands. I hope it makes them believe that they can do it.


    to be continued....post to long
    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
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  8. #43
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    part 2 continued


    However, before I go, I’m going to leave this with you Bob, to ponder as you run out the clock on the bay.


    The internet is forever. Years will pass and we’ll both be long forgotten. However, our words here will remain. You may not have noticed but wooden boats and wooden boat building is teetering on the abyss between obscurity and a home building resurgence. Which way it goes, will for the most part, be decided by us old guys.


    One approach would be to encourage younger people to pick up a hammer and some coated deck screws and then scrounge around for some ACX plywood and some pallet hardwood. Encourage them to try, to get started, to take some risks while they can afford to and welcome them to a beautiful hobby of woodworking and boat building. Maybe that first boat they make is an ugly, hard chined, plywood boat, but it lites a fire in them. Maybe they start to create demand for more and better materials. Maybe the demand for boat building schools grows along with a demand for skilled traditional boat builders. Then the next boat they build, when they have some money and experience in both building and navigating, is your idealize version of what a wooden boat should be.


    That sounds good to me. A rising tide raises all boats. The more people in the hobby the better. Prices fall and access to materials increase. Our hobby thrives and the traditional skills that we all admire don’t go the way of the dodo bird.


    Or Bob we can do it your way. Shout people down. Insult them. Mock them.


    Because thats what you, along with a few others did in this thread Bob and here it is for all times. For some person, potentially interested in the hobby, with maybe a similar question, to see how this forum treats people who dare attempt anything in boat building at anything less than a master craftsman. Someone who will quickly dismiss the idea of boat building, because there are very few other resources for potential boat builders in Boise, Denver or Branson. They’ll believe they can’t do it, that it can’t be done. So will the next and the next and the next until their all gone.


    Then you’ll sit on your rotting monument of a hull wondering where all the woods boat builders went. Now you’ll know Bob, because you help send them there.


    So hopefully, if your the new guy reading this thread and you are in fact still here and reading this, I’ll tell you some truth.


    You can do it, this is not rocket science or brain surgery. There are people in isolated corners of the world building ocean boats from pulp wood logs and caulking them with tree sap. Your plywood, cedar stripped craft with epoxy will be just fine. It may not be a “boat for the ages” but you can do it and you’ll learn how to do it better next time. There are great books out there by guys like Pardey, Gerr and Buehler. Guys who have really done it and are happy to show you the way.


    Don’t let what you have seen here and will see in other posts deter you from building your dream. Furthermore don’t let the few keyboard commandos on here scare you away from the depth of knowledge contained in many of these pages. Don’t miss out on the beauty that is created here by some really talented people. It is inspirational if you can be more resilient than me!


    Finally, Bob, good luck. Seriously, think about what I’ve said. I mean this, if you come to NY you are welcome to stop over anytime. I’m easy to find and you can send me an email and we’ll work out all the details. We’ve got beautiful part of the world here in upstate NY and you’ll find plenty to do.


    Come out to the shop and take a look around, swing a hammer with me and let me remind you about that light. It’s not the one out your window brother, It’s in your heart, it’s in there waiting for you to want to see it. If no one else in your life will, I would be proud to help.
    A ship is safe in the harbor, but that's not what ships are for.

    http://www.seadreamerproject.com
    http://www.youtube.com/c/SixPointsWoodWorks

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    I think that a new guy reading this in the future will decide to fully research his availble options before starting construction. Hopefully said person will choose wisely.

    The future of wooden boats is not tied to or dependent on boats built to sub-par standards or looks. Wooden boats are an art form that people enjoy the use and looks of the boats. There are exquisite examples of home built boats that inspire and there are an equal number of completely uninspired home built boats. What you have in the end is up to you.

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Scott
    Cleek is a hard case , but he is OUR hard case .
    We all know he does not shy from his opinions .
    Please donít take it personal .
    Bruce

  11. #46
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    Incredible in so many ways... The crucification cross was made of PT Lumber...
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    No pressure treated wood here!
    Jay

  13. #48
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Scott, Bob is not a bad human being, he has just stated the facts as he understands them. Personally I'm not in disagreement with his opinions.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Jay,
    I'd like to own a boat like that. Is that your railway?

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Scott - Please don't go away. I've admired George Buehler's writings & approach to boatbuilding & this forum would be richer if you continue to share your obviously open minded interpretation of his approach. With your response (a proportionate response to the extreme attack on you) you've carved out a place here I for one respect. For many of us here, wooden boats have some degree of profound meaning ranging from vague spirituality to religious dogma...so when someone appears to gore their sacred cow sparks will fly... comes with the territory.

    My "Buehler" approach to building a planned (but not built) 45 foot "Troller Yacht" given affordability in money & labor as essential elements was to get a big stack of 2 by 6/8/10 (whichever I could find) "structural select" doug fir and use that as the inner planking thinking the extra weight useful as ballast. Easy to source (if you order enough) nice to work & pleasant to live with. I choked at the cost of ply without voids & the daunting labor of two more planking courses...plus the epoxy required to bond it all into a structural composite. Although a barrel of PL type polyurethane as the bonding/sealing agent has merit. You'd still need a heavy epoxy/glass outer coating to keep the ply going for more than a very few years - unless you sprang for the really good stuff...I think the absolute necessity of protecting that outer ply layer sunk the plan for me...it would be much, much easier to wizbang 13 the hull (wizbang 13 as a verb!)

    Please carefully consider wizbang"s excellent suggestion -
    "But , as I mentioned on Facebook, I would strip plank her with inch and a half squares and 2 layers of dynel. Itís the fastest way to build, easy for an amateur, proven .(yes, Iím a fan of strip planking. My own boat is 35 yo, built on the cheap, but almost like new.)
    Good luck & stay in touch. Moe

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Hmm , thanks moe. I did not invent strip planking, I learned it from Paul Johnson, who also designed boats for amateur construction. He never published a book of his ideas. If he had, I believe his designs would be far more popular.
    Point is , I built my boat of two by fours from the corner lumber store, bolted , nailed and screwed it with galvanized steel, The only place I did not economize was the epoxy.
    Scott I built my 34 ‘ 12 ton boat alone in 12 weeks. ( when I was young). She has pounded 70,000 miles of salt , been hit by two hurricanes at sea and countless gales.
    Simple strip planking is crazy strong. It’s freakin easy. And contrary to popular opinion it is the fastest way to build a vessel.

  17. #52
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    A strip plank hull built from 1.5" squares would be a far better idea.

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    You could use 1.5" WRC decking, edge glued with epoxy and edge nailed with HDG box nails. On that straight ribbed hull it would be so easy and go very quickly, while also costing noticeably less than any of the options suggested so far. I've done a bit of this and it has a lot going for it. Excellent strategy.
    Last edited by Gib Etheridge; 04-08-2018 at 07:56 PM.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Y'all doing large strip builds.. assuming glass on the outside only? if that be the case.. movement of the wood is less, or more concern? Then... the entrapment of the ever present moisture over time if the inside is not encapsulated...

    I envision a large canoe when hear Y'all talking strip planking... wonder if the ark was strip built? "Noah?"
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    My boat (woodwind) is not glassed or dyneled , just “resinated”. Both outside and inside . Every stick in the construction of the vessel is either epoxied to whatever it touches or is coated with epoxy when finished . Floors to the keel,planking to the frames, plywood gussets, integral clamp.My masts are glued in! ( never had em out).
    Yes , wood movement is definitely less in a bunch of small planks than fewer big ones.
    Its not a canoe Denise , that is strip built , not strip planked . Woodwind has 7000 , 4 inch nails set vertically in the planking. She is much much stronger than just the inch and a half of wood alone . One cannot drill a 3 inch hole anywhere in her without hitting one of those steel nails . No vertical nails used in canoes ( strip building).
    Last edited by wizbang 13; 04-08-2018 at 12:29 PM.

  21. #56
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    Jay,
    I'd like to own a boat like that. Is that your railway?
    The boat is a re-design of Common Sense #5, a class of boats that were designed and built by Matt Walsh of Garrett and Walsh Boat Works on Terminal Island CA. The boats were intended as an overnight cruiser racer for inter club racing. The boats proved to be incredibly fast and sea worthy and still can hold their own against many modern designs. Should you wish to build one for yourself, I am drawing plans up.
    Jay

  22. #57
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    Wiz, yes your boat is wonderful but when I envision a BIG canoe what I should have said directly instead referring, is the way strip canoes, and boats, are diy built.
    Complete hull glass in and out with wood (or foamcore). then everything is fit it in/out. Frames, rails bulkheads, hull liner Etc.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    The first thing is that the cost of different timber in one hull layer is negligible to the overall cost of the the build. The second thing is that the grain and quality of the timber is more important that rot treatment.

    What problem are you trying to solve?

    Timber can be preserved after construction by epoxy, zinc or copper napthenate, paint and most importantly by good construction practice and design details. Pressure treated can mean different things from LOSP to CCA etc, some can be glued easily and some cannot. Pressure treatment typically only works well on sapwood- not the best kind of dimensional timber you can use on a boat but it should be fine as many boats here have treated pine interior timber, but you would not want it getting wet.

    Nothing wrong with going down that path but in my view you are better to get top quality boatbuilding timber as its a much more pleasant to work with, adds resale value to the boat (trust me circumstances can change) and makes the remainder of the project far more rewarding.

    Re reading comments, ignore Bob Cleek I dont think he is a boat builder with any real experience. Ignore the "poison wood" rubbish as well. Epoxy covered treated timber boats are non toxic compared to the lead painted classics. Actually neither are toxic unless you intend to eat or smoke them.

    I would look at the aim of the project, is it to build or to liveaboard. If building is important then build away but there are many methods, all have one thing in common which is building is Expensive with a capital E. Buehler was a bullsh!tter regarding costs and primarily sold dreams, if you embark on this then think about resale.
    Last edited by Paul G.; 04-08-2018 at 03:25 PM.
    whatever rocks your boat

  24. #59
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    On a boat of this size with a Monocoque 1.5" thick hull fiberglass would not provide an additional gain until the glass was about 3/8". I'd hate to the one sanding and fairing.

  25. #60
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Agree, the glass is not structural or shouldnt be
    whatever rocks your boat

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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    Should you wish to build one for yourself, I am drawing plans up.
    Jay
    Jay, Thanks but no thanks. No more projects for me, I'm going sailing.

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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by skaraborgcraft View Post
    How are YOU defining a "crappy planking scheme" ?
    I define a good planking scheme as one that Lloyd's and the USCG will pass. One that will keep a C.O.I. and be insured. carvel and double planked with butts landing between frames tend to stay insured, 50 to 100 years is reasonable. MVs Grace a 1913 New York Launch and Engine Company double ender is still carrying passengers. 40 percent of her planking and fasteners are original. Treated stuck to ply just is not a competitive. Plus it takes fewer tools, isn't so toxic, costs less to repair and doesn't cause the framing to rot after a few years. just my experience from repairing alot of bad repairs from other yards.

  28. #63
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    I can't imagine being able to get insurance on a boat built the way the OP is suggesting. In addition I would venture to guess that documenting the build with regular USCG inspections would be an exercise in futility.

    Standards become and remain "Standards" for a reason.

  29. #64
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    On a boat of this size with a Monocoque 1.5" thick hull fiberglass would not provide an additional gain until the glass was about 3/8". I'd hate to the one sanding and fairing.
    It would help to keep the gribbles out of the woodwork though.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    teak planking live oak frames.. done deal see ya next century LOL
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  31. #66
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    I can't imagine being able to get insurance on a boat built the way the OP is suggesting. In addition I would venture to guess that documenting the build with regular USCG inspections would be an exercise in futility.

    Standards become and remain "Standards" for a reason.
    The USCG does not certify recreational boats, either commercial or private build.

    http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/certified.html

  32. #67
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Yea, no cop ever looked at the construction of my boat.

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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by jackster View Post
    The USCG does not certify recreational boats, either commercial or private build.

    http://newboatbuilders.com/pages/certified.html
    Im aware of that. I was affirming the previous post about a good planking scheme being one that would be accepted by a governing authority.

    Whether or not Wiz's build was inspected or certified does not change the fact that he built his boat in a tried and true fashion by accepted "Standards". He has further proven his building method by logging 70K miles in it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    Im aware of that. I was affirming the previous post about a good planking scheme being one that would be accepted by a governing authority.

    Whether or not Wiz's build was inspected or certified does not change the fact that he built his boat in a tried and true fashion by accepted "Standards". He has further proven his building method by logging 70K miles in it.
    On these long-running discussions I tend to go back and read the OP, unfortunately they don't show as a header so most people just respond to what they see last posted instead of

    the actual context of the original post.
    Scott did state that he has access to a lot of white oak. Not a bad thing because trawlers are generally supposed to be heavy boats aren't they?

    Other than plywood, are there any composite materials out there that can be screwed to supporting frames and or planks? Of course there is!

    Trouble is, everybody keeps hammering and hammering on the pressure treated lumber (pun intended) and they don't seem to realize he hasn't built the boat yet and put this out there for discussion.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Pressure treated planking

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    It would help to keep the gribbles out of the woodwork though.
    Yes, but the polyestermites will get you unless you use the radioactive paint. I wish i hadn't lost that article.

    Quote Originally Posted by Roger Cumming View Post
    Pressure-treated lumber is not recommended by the manufacturers for use inside a dwelling because of its toxicity, only for exterior use such as for decks. Common sense would suggest its use for boatbuilding likewise would be a health hazard. The chemicals the wood is treated with attacks fasteners and make it unsuitable for use in a boat.
    Not recommend when? Which preservative were they talking about? I have a wood foundation house built in 1989, and the entire partially buried lower level should have been PT lumber and sheathing, but the cheap B@$t@*d skimped in places that had to be replaced. It is CCA treated and there are no fumes.

    I'm not seeing answers to these questions: First, what is wood pressure treated with? Then, will the chemicals leach out and leave you with plain untreated rot-prone pine? Then, if it will retain the preservative, is it any good for boat construction? OK, the last one, some answers say it's crap. The ones that say to source the wood and treatment applicator are good, but don't address the readily available stuff well.

    It appears that ground contact grade AC2 could be good in fresh water. There is a salt-water piling grade with 2.5 oz per board ft of (didn't say which) preservative. So yes, the salt water piling grade should last -- if you can figure out what it is and where to get it. My dock, is not in good shape, but not rotten after perhaps 30 years (it was old when I bought the place). It is half immersed half the time and most likely cheap (like the builder) CCA treated wood.

    There have been a number of pressure treatment chemicals used over the years, some of which are more toxic than others. In the beginning, there was creosote, then Gardner's process in 1875, then pentachlorophenol, and CCA and whatever the new AC2 stuff is.
    http://www.buellinspections.com/not-...created-equal/
    https://www.pca.state.mn.us/sites/de.../w-hhw4-75.pdf
    http://www.kopperspc.com/micropro/micropro-faq.html AC2 is MicroPro, whatever that is. Freshwater contact, but not saltwater.
    http://www.kopperspc.com/hi-bor/ Hawaiian termites
    https://www.midwestmanufacturing.com...ureTreated.pdf
    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2015...treated-lumber
    http://www.finehomebuilding.com/2015...treated-lumber

    There are several grades of PT SYP. The local big box lists Cedartone AC2, AC2 above ground, AC2 ground contact and FG (Foundation Grade), which is CCA. Different grades have different amounts of preservative, among other things. It all comes wet as a soggy sponge and needs to dry out and warp like mad before the glue will stick. In any stack of PT SYP, you can find some good, bad and ugly boards. When I need a header, I look for a stiff, heavy piece with thick summer wood. Selecting enough good pieces to build a boat might be a challenge.

    Bottom line, with a little research and careful selection of each stick, it just might work out well.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

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