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Thread: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

  1. #36
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Day 7, surprisingly, had the camera showing signs of life again. I was pleasantly surprised, and hopeful that it might continue to dry out and start taking real pictures again. It wasn't quite there yet.

    DSCN2632.jpg

    I stuck to my plan for a layover day in the Fox Islands, and had a leisurely start to the day. First I explored Marten Island--well worth it--climbing up to the summit and spending the morning scrambling around cliffs. Then I returned to the boat and untied from my double bow anchors, leaving them in place. I even remembered to tie an empty water bottle to the stern anchor as a buoy so I would, in theory, be able to tie the boat up in exactly the same spot so I could still get in and out in knee-deep water, and still keep the boat off the rocks.

    Then it was off on a nice sailing jaunt around the Fox Island group (counterclockwise again), dodging around the extensive rocks and shoals that seemed to be everywhere. I came in close to West Fox Island (pics are from my 2014 trip):

    DSCF8021.jpg

    but didn't come ashore, as there were kayakers camped there--the first boats I'd seen since Fox Island's lone anchored sloop. I then made the hop over to Hawk Island a few miles southeast, and back to Marten Island, in a big figure-eight loop--a beautiful day of sailing, route partly visible in the image below--and finally back to my anchorage in the NE corner of Marten Island in the late afternoon.

    Day 8.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-07-2018 at 01:09 AM.
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  2. #37
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Does anyone know anything about the WBF photo posting? It seems like when I post photos, they show up in my postings fine (sometimes takes a few tries). But then I'll log in again later and some photos in some posts will have changed to just blue text links to attachments--for example, everything in post #36 now looks like blue links, not photos. And I have no idea if that's what anyone else is seeing.

    All right, thanks--it'd be nice to have actual photos on the thread if I can figure out how.

    Tom
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  3. #38
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Does anyone know anything about the WBF photo posting? It seems like when I post photos, they show up in my postings fine (sometimes takes a few tries). But then I'll log in again later and some photos in some posts will have changed to just blue text links to attachments--for example, everything in post #36 now looks like blue links, not photos. And I have no idea if that's what anyone else is seeing.

    All right, thanks--it'd be nice to have actual photos on the thread if I can figure out how.

    Tom
    The links are all dead ones (at least for me) - so I think something may be interrupting your upload of the pics. Make sure the upload finishes & you get the "Insert Inline" option.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  4. #39
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Strange thing!
    Some pics I couldn’t See yesterday, are now visable, others are not.
    Do you work the photographs through a program before you post them?
    When posting from a phone, I had to view them First and resave them, or some would show up Sideways...

    Eagerly waiting another installment of you’re adventure with or without pics.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Thanks for the thoughts on photo posting. I have not actually been using any "Insert Inline" option from the WBF, or using any other method other than the WBF itself. I simply use the image icon from the Forum toolbar. That opens a dialogue box that lets me choose an image from a URL or from my computer. I choose "From Computer" and select a photo from my computer, then hit the "Post Photo" button. A short time later it shows up in my post in a smaller size; when I save the post, the photo is full size.

    But sometimes it changes back to an attachment link. Hmm. I'm not smart enough to understand any of this. I guess I'll keep experimenting.

    Tom
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  6. #41
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    All right, I just re-uploaded the photos in post #36--can anyone/everyone see them? After saving the edits to the post, I see real photos and not blue text links to attachments.

    Arrgh!
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  7. #42
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    So, I sailed right back to my anchorage, and my trick of leaving all the anchors in place with an empty water bottle as a buoy worked perfectly. I got the boat tied up in the exact spot I needed to, so I could again step out onto an underwater slab in knee-deep water, with the boat itself in water deep enough to keep it off the rocks.

    For my second night on Marten Island I was again tenting up on the east summit dome. Late at night I woke up and crawled out of the tent just to enjoy the darkness and silence. Kind of silence--there was a barred owl calling from the trees nearby.

    And then all at once the Northern Lights came up, all white and green and gold. Very spooky to stand there all alone and watch these creeping tendrils of color twisting around the sky in utter silence. Made me feel very very small indeed. And lucky. They lasted a few minutes and then faded away again. I went back to bed grateful to have seen it.

    The next day I packed up and headed back toward Killarney, not sure where I'd camp but knowing it was time to start the trip back to Spanish. The camera was still kind of working, but not great--enough to give me hope, though.

    DSCN2649.jpg

    Funny, it seemed like the camera was working better shooting video than photos. Who knows why?

    Anyway, I had a nice jaunt back to Killarney and started thinking about maybe getting a hotel room instead of camping. So I hauled out at the ice cream shop (now closed, but the ramp is a perfect small boat parking spot--photo from a few days back on my outbound stopover):

    DSCN3584.jpg

    It wasn't much past noon so I walked up to the Killarney Mountain Lodge to see about a room. Ha. As I should have (and in fact, did) known, they wanted an exorbitant amount--I think $260 or something. So, no. That's more than my budget for the whole trip.

    But there was a less upscale hotel at the west end of town, and I had just realized today was actually my birthday, so I was becoming fixated on the idea of a take-out pizza, a shower, and a comfy room to hole up in and read. Really, I had pretty much decided on it but wasn't admitting it to myself as I walked over. On the way I stopped by the Credit Union, which one of the Killarney Mountain Lodge staff had told me also housed a shelf of free books.

    Nope, but they were cheap, and a pretty good selection at that. I spent a while browsing through and picking out a bunch, then realized I had no money at all. The ladies in the Credit Union told me to take them anyway. I did. Happy birthday.

    Then I found a much cheaper room in a nice bed & breakfast, ordered a pizza, and walked back to the Credit Union to give them $5 for the books with my change. Then I enjoyed my birthday by living out my vision of pizza and books, starting with James Michener's Caravans about an English diplomat in 1940s Afghanistan (a book I had never heard of, and the first by Michener I've read. The verdict: pretty good.)

    Oh, yeah, and when I went down to see about leaving my boat at the ice cream store ramp overnight, there was an itinerant MD loading his boat at the marina. He told me it'd be fine since the marina/ice cream shop owners had left Killarney for the season and would never know anyway. And then he changed his mind and offered me his now-empty slip for the night instead. He jumped in his boat and motored off to his house across the channel, and I tied up in his slip. Happy birthday indeed.

    Here's the route from day 8 again, a simple sail westward from the Fox Islands to Killarney:

    Day 8.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-07-2018 at 01:39 AM.
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  8. #43
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Day 9 out of Killarney started out pretty much windless. But not entirely. Instead of rowing, I hoisted up the sail and started gliding slowly westward down the channel through town, standing up and keeping my weight to leeward to keep the sail filled. I was just passing a beautiful wooden motor yacht (a Garden design, maybe, tied up at a dock along the channel) when the woman on board shouted out "Beautiful boat!" I was thinking the same thing as I ghosted past. I could be very happy with an elegant wooden motor yacht to live aboard.

    Especially if someone else was buying my gas, I thought. And decided I was even happier with my little sail-and-oar boat.

    Out on Killarney Bay it was still so foggy I was steering by compass rather than VFR. Winds were picking up slightly and the fog was starting to disperse. I kept on through Killarney Bay and on into the Lansdowne Channel, where for some reason the camera decided to start working again:



    Yes, I know I said it wasn't worth it to boom the sail out with an oar. It's not, really. But apparently sometimes I still do it. You can still see the clearing fog along shore, and blocking all view of the land (which should be visible) behind the boat.

    You can also see my line/bungee autopilot doing some more steering. Really, if you don't already have this rigged for your own boat, you should go do it right now. You won't be sorry.
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  9. #44
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    This is beautiful.

    I would have a very hard time leaving that spot.


  10. #45
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    All the pics are working now.
    Lovely.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  11. #46
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Yes indeed the pics are working. Sorry about my pic - I was testing the process thinking I could delete it - but I can't see how to!

    I was wrong on my directions earlier - they were for a different forum - sorry about that!

    Michener has a ton of different books out about many different places & most seem to be pretty well researched. A pleasant way to become familiar with an area. A link to his Amazon page, that shows just how many he wrote: https://www.amazon.com/James-A.-Michener/e/B000APVC66
    Last edited by Garret; 04-07-2018 at 12:55 PM.
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  12. #47
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    To delete images from your computer>Go Advanced, scroll down to - Attachments> manage attachments> select and delete files.

  13. #48
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Thanks!
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  14. #49
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Inspirational! Thanks Tom!

  15. #50
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    The can never be too many sail and oar boat videos
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  16. #51
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Thanks for the comments, everyone. I'll continue posting/reliving my trip where I'd left off on day 9, sailing out of the fog on the Lansdowne Channel. By the time I reached the end of the channel, I'd have to decide whether I was turning north to retrace my path under the low bridges and into Bay of Islands, or continue west through the town of Little Current.

    The wind was good for either heading by the time I got out of the channel, so I headed west on the principle that a loop is always better than an out-and-back. The wind shifted more westerly, making it a beat past the Strawberry Island light (I was pleasantly surprised to find we were able to make it well to windward of the buoy visible in the video):



    Then on toward the swing bridge, which is supposed to open every hour on the hour but didn't show any signs of it:

    DSCN2672.jpg

    So I dropped the sail, rowed under, then hoisted the sail again and tacked my way through town. It was getting to be evening and I wasn't sure where I'd be camping, so I didn't stop. Just west of town, along the southern shores of Great La Cloche Island, the chart showed some promising isolated inlets and back bays. With the water levels high, I was able to get way back in away from town and the main channel:

    DSCN2685.jpg

    And set up my tent on limestone slabs amid a mad anarchic cloud of mosquitoes (the high water level here made them a problem) for a cozy night's sleep, counting on the fact that the high water had cut off the road from the rest of the island, making it unlikely I'd be disturbed by angry landowners (I hoped):

    DSCN2683.jpg
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  17. #52
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Here's the route from day 9 (the red line heading north is my route into Georgian Bay from earlier in the trip):

    Day 9.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-08-2018 at 04:37 PM.
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  18. #53
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Day 10 started out with clear skies and without any wind at all. I rowed my way out of the back bay where I'd camped, then (seeing few alternatives) rowed west across the North Channel back toward the Benjamin Islands. I was so happy with how the Alaska performed under oars that I was almost glad there was no wind. After watching and counting strokes, I calculated that, rowing easily on flat water, I was doing 3 knots. That's at a pace I could hold all day--which means rowing might, on average, be faster than sailing in this boat!

    A wind did eventually come up, giving me a nice ride around Amedroz Island toward the Benjies. Good under oars, but not too shabby under sail, either:



    I kept going toward the Benjamins, but decided I'd check out Croker Island just to the east on my way over.

    DSCN2733.jpg

    I was tempted to try to sail through the narrow rocky gap between Secretary Island and Croker Island, but figured it'd be too risky. Then, thinking of the high water levels this year, decided it would be now or never. So I snuck through. Made it, but just barely--there's a good reason the chart shows the passage blocked with rocks and reefs--it pretty much is.

    I sailed around the corner to find, I hoped, solitude and shelter tucked up behind Croker's south summit. I found this instead:

    DSCN2739.jpg

    So turned away and found a nearby beach instead--a beach I hadn't even known was there, tucked up into Croker Island's sheltered bay:

    DSCN2745.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-08-2018 at 04:36 PM.
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  19. #54
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    It was tempting to camp on the nice beach--there was even an outdoor toilet in the woods--but fresh bear tracks in the sand convinced me to continue on to the Benjamins. So, off I went.

    With the Benjamins virtually empty this late in the season (not counting the powerboat raft-up at Croker), I decided to take the opportunity to explore the main anchorage, which is a sheltered bay between North and South Benjamin. It's open to the east, but I wasn't sure whether I'd be able to sail out the west side.

    Turns out it is possible, though maybe not advisable. There was a narrow rock-studded channel just big enough, at these water levels anyway, to let me sail through on a close reach. Barely.

    DSCN2763.jpg

    I turned north and continued up the west side of North Benjamin, heading for a hidden lagoon I'd stayed at before. It was still there, though not that easy to spot if you're not paying attention:

    DSCN2768.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-09-2018 at 12:00 AM.
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  20. #55
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Perfect little camping spot, though--one of my favorite places to stay in the Benjamins. There are never any big boats around this side, as it's too rocky, shallow, and exposed for them. Just right for a sail and oar cruiser, though:

    DSCN2834.jpg

    With smooth granite slabs for the tent, and sunset views of the North Channel:

    DSCN2823.jpg
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-09-2018 at 12:04 AM.
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  21. #56
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    How I miss those places.

    The western entrance to the Benjamins is quite deep. (15',IIRC).Very large boats go through it.
    Sailboats have trouble a bit to the east(4-ish') and the northwest (0-1') just off the channel,is a rock garden.

    About bears,we saw one swimming mid-channel between Secretary and the Sow and Pigs,with some twit right up close taking pictures.

    How deep was Hole in the Wall at the west end of the Landowne? We've been past it,but only when the water was really low.
    R
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  22. #57
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Arrgh--pictures are posting fine, and then turning into text links when I log back into the Forum. I'll try later; got to go do something useful for now.

    Tom
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  23. #58
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Williamson View Post
    How I miss those places.

    The western entrance to the Benjamins is quite deep. (15',IIRC).Very large boats go through it.
    Sailboats have trouble a bit to the east(4-ish') and the northwest (0-1') just off the channel,is a rock garden.

    About bears,we saw one swimming mid-channel between Secretary and the Sow and Pigs,with some twit right up close taking pictures.

    How deep was Hole in the Wall at the west end of the Landowne? We've been past it,but only when the water was really low.
    R
    Ron,

    thanks for chiming in. I've never seen a boat (other than me) go through the western entrance to the main Benjamins anchorage--it's pretty tight even for a sail-and-oar boat if you're sailing. Motoring through would simplify things, I suppose, but I wouldn't want to sail a big boat through there even if it's deep--unless the wind is perfect for the heading you need, maybe. I'm talking about the passage through rocks just off the SW tip of North Benjamin--does the main channel go through farther south, just off S Benjamin? That might explain it.

    Hole in the Wall has always been plenty deep when I went through there (2014 and 2017)--it didn't seem like a particularly tricky or narrow or shallow passage based on some of the other places I've been. A bit rocky at the southern end, not sure of the depth because when you can sail in 6" that's not a major concern.

    Bears swimming out to those rocks? That would be neat to see. I guess you're not really safe sleeping aboard if they go out that far.
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  24. #59
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    I never took that under-the-bridge route of course, but I sailed our MacGregor through Collins Inlet, and have been in most of those places in Drake -- AND I MISS THEM!

    Great thread -- thanks for posting it!

    Tom, if you go a little farther, you come to Black Bay, Sandy Bay, and Henvey Inlet. They have no charted depths, or at least didn't last time I was there. So, cruisers don't go in there much. But it's gorgeous! Some of it has the red rock you see in the Benjamins. It's perfect for a small oar-and-sail boat such as yours.

    Next time, go a little farther and launch at French River, and explore from there. And the distances are not large either. You could run with the prevailing winds to Parry Sound, then hire a driver to get you back to your trailer. (I did that for a Lake Superior trip once in the M26.)

    Dave

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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Dave,

    I did manage to get to the Bustards and on to Black Bay in my 2014 trip. I didn't want to turn around then but I was out of time and out of charts, too.

    I was kind of thinking going on to Parry Sound and then the Trent-Severn into Lake Ontario, and then the Rideau to Ottawa, and then...

    Lots more to see in Georgian Bay, that's for sure. I think I'll have a month next summer, have to decide whether I want to go to Georgian Bay or try something new--I have a few more Canadian ideas in mind. Would there be any chance of linking up in August if I were to get down toward Parry Sound?

    Tom
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  26. #61
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    I haven't been over that way since about 2011.
    My memory tells me that the deep channel is tight to South Benjamin and I'm pretty sure that I've waded from North to the rocks in the middle.
    It would be fun in a small boat.
    R

    just read your reply to Dave.

    The traffic gets stupid (water and road)during the summer,especially south of Parry Sound.
    Last edited by Ron Williamson; 04-08-2018 at 06:34 PM.
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Thanks, Ron. I really liked the emptiness of this September trip--no mosquitoes, either, except that one night on Great La Cloche Island just west of Little Current.

    On with the trip! Here's the route from day 10, about 20 miles total (that used to seem like a long day in the North Channel/Georgian Bay; in my Alaska it seems about average):

    Day 10.jpg

    And, with no further adieu, the last stretch back to Spanish on day 11, 10 miles or so (which makes Spanish a perfect launching spot, with good camping and exploring so close by--you can always get somewhere cool even if you don't leave the ramp until mid-afternoon):

    Day 11.jpg

    Which was a beautiful tranquil morning sail with the autopilot in command:



    Funny how my perceptions have changed about doing this kind of thing in small boats--it strikes me as perfectly pleasant and casual now, making longer and longer trips seem like a logical next step. If you can live on your boat for a week, you can do the same thing all summer long, I reckon. And I've got a great boat to take me wherever I want to go.

    All right, a final overview of the entire route--I think it was about 180 miles over 11 days (actually 10 days, because I had one layover in the Fox Islands). I'd have loved to go further into Georgian Bay--next time!

    Day 1 to 11.jpg

    What's next? I got me some ideas for this summer, oh yes I do...

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-09-2018 at 01:02 AM.
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    And now, the post that probably makes the rest of this entire thread somewhat redundant--a little video journal of the trip I put together, complete with potentially annoying soundtrack. I think it gives a pretty good overview of how the trip progressed from day to day. I have to say I really liked going so late in the season--empty anchorages, good weather, water still warm enough for a (brief) swim now and then.

    Enjoy!



    And by the way, if you haven't sailed in Georgian Bay yet--why NOT?!

    Tom
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    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Some final comments about Don Kurylko's Alaska design, in no particular order:

    1. Aesthetics are almost completely subjective, but Alaska still seems like a strikingly beautiful boat to me. Sometimes looking at all those curves, I can hardly believe I built something like that. Really satisfying--unlike my previous Bolger boat (which I still love), this is a REAL boat. But really, the construction was pretty simple--didn't even need any stealers during planking, just planked right up. (Well, ok, I used a couple of stealers at the tuck of the transom, but only because I had screwed up and needed to straighten things out).

    2. I made some changes to Don's design. Most obviously, I am sailing with the mainsail alone (85 sq ft) instead of mainsail + mizzen (134 sq ft). I certainly haven't felt the need for more sail area, and I appreciate the simplicity of a single sheet. Also, the cockpit is without a doubt, roomier without the ketch mizzen stepped.

    Another change was that I sealed off the bow as a buoyancy chamber, where Don's plans show a teak grate over an anchor well. For the Inside Passage, where you'll want 400+ feet of anchor rode, Don's is the better way to do it, I'm sure. For my purposes, my way is ok for now. I doubt that extra flotation up there is a bad thing, anyway.

    Another change: I sealed off the thwarts as airtight chambers, with glass tape and epoxy, instead of using the laminated frames that Don's plans show. I also left out the floorboards. I hate floorboards. I like the entire hull to be open and readily accessible for bailing and sponging. It's also less work to NOT build floorboards. I'm all about doing as little work as possible. But I have no regrets about this decision.

    3. Sail plan: sheeting angles are critical for maximum performance with a boomless rig. I'm sheeting now to the horn cleats on the aft deck. This is about perfect for reaching, and a decent enough compromise for beating. You'd have to be a better sailor than I am to be bothered by it.

    I've also gotten rid of the rope traveler, and am simply just hooking the sheet on the new cleat at each tack by hand. On downwind courses I do also rig a traveler for the ring to run on, so gybing is a little more controlled if I'm too busy to hook the cleat manually, but that's not really necessary. It's nice, though, especially when it's windy enough to gybe with caution.

    I really like the simplicity of the boomless rig. Does downwind performance suffer? I suppose. Do I care? Not really. I have adjusted to tacking my way downwind rather than trying to run, anyway, which seems to reduce the loss in performance.

    4. I can't recommend Dabbler Sails (aka Stuart Hopkins) highly enough. What a beautiful sail! He coached me through how to do a proper spar bend test, sewed a beautifully setting sail, and provided a custom sail bag and pennant to go with it. The mainsail is the single biggest expense on the boat, and probably also the best value per dollar. I'm so glad I went with a high-end sail. I'm sure I'll get better at setting it correctly--any failures in that department in these photos and videos is mine, not his.

    5. Rows. Like. A. DREAM. 'Nuff said.

    No, I guess not. I've concluded that for any windward work, rowing is the fastest option, and often the best option. Does that mean I'll always row to windward? Hell no. I'm too lazy, and I like tacking my way upwind. But it makes me really appreciate the oar & sail ideal that designers like Clint Chase are pursuing (e.g. Clint's Drake design with downwind sail and optimal rowing configuration).

    6. Comparisons with Ross Lillistone's Phoenix III (the other design I've cruised extensively):

    They seem pretty well-matched overall. Alaska is a little more tender initially (and I'm sailing with full kit and 100 lbs ballast), but hardens up nicely and surges along. There have been times when I've moved up to sit on the rail--something I've never felt the need to do in the Phoenix III. Phoenix III has a little more freeboard. Both boats are simple to recover from a capsize. Phoenix III probably has the edge for hard beating; Alaska has the edge in rowing. I'd say both boats are about equally comfortable to sail and sleep in. I really like the open storage area under the Alaska's aft deck--stowing anything in the Phoenix III's stern compartments can be an exercise in frustration when you are trying to get it out.

    I think that anything I'd be brave enough to do in a small boat, I'd be comfortable doing in either design.

    All right, enough for now. Thanks again for all the comments here--it's been fun.

    Tom
    Last edited by WI-Tom; 04-10-2018 at 06:49 PM.
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  30. #65
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,575

    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Tom,

    The shore of Georgian Bay gets very crowded with cottages as you go south, starting at Point Au Baril (although Shawanaga is OK, being Ojibway). And the cottagers don't want you on shore. From Parry Sound to the entryway into the Severn it seems like every rock has a cabin on it. You could map out possible camping places ahead of time, using park guides, and googleEarth, but the splendid wilderness is gone.

    At Parry Sound you could go offshore, from Martyr's Cove to the Western Islands and then to Hope. That would give you a feeling for the Bay's size and power.

    Once well into the Trent Severn it's different. There is lots of bush, plus farm fields. between the towns.

    Bugs though.

    Dave

  31. #66
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Louisville, KY
    Posts
    657

    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Great writeup! The mix of text, pics, and video made for a great experience. I can also highly recommend the tiller tamer. I took a slightly more complicated approach than just using a bungee that allows me to quickly change the friction, but either way, it made a big difference to my sailing experience.

  32. #67
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,085

    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    I'm curious about your tiller tamer--why do you need to change the tension? I've found with the set-up I'm describing here that no adjustments are necessary. Once it's set up you can steer as normal, but tension is just right to hold the tiller solidly in place whenever you let go--no adjustments needed. Have you found some benefit I'm not thinking of to adjustable tension?

    Either way, it's a crucial piece of gear for me.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  33. #68
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Lakebay, WA
    Posts
    631

    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay



    Tom[/QUOTE]

    very nice video - what camera and what editing program are you using ?
    1955 Fontana 18' - 1958 Atomic 4
    1960 Skippy 12C FeatherCraft - 1947 Mercury KD4 Rocket
    1985 Glen L15 - 1980 Johnson 7.5 hp
    2016 kayak Mill Creek 13

  34. #69
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    northwestern Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,085

    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Thanks--I had a lot of fun putting that together (using a woefully inefficient stop-motion technique for the dotted lines, with a separate image for each segment of line; there must be a better way!) I forget the camera--it's a pretty basic non-SLR camera with maybe 10x optical zoom. I'll look up the make/model and post it.

    For the editing I used Microsoft Movie Maker--it was already installed in my laptop and seems pretty simple to work with.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

    www.tompamperin.com

  35. #70
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Victoria, BC, Canada
    Posts
    1,093

    Default Re: A Kurylko Alaska in Georgian Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by WI-Tom View Post
    Tom, this one's a keeper. Captures what sail and oar cruising is all about.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

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