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Thread: Reclaimed red oak

  1. #36
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Ballard
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    A couple thoughts about epoxy and red oak.

    - Isn't soaking up red oak with epoxy a false economy? As in, wouldn't it just be cheaper/more efficient to get more rot resistant material to start with and not have to pickle it with a really expensive two-part goo? There's no shame in letting a wooden boat be a wooden boat. I don't get the point of putting epoxy on everything. It's not paint. It's for adhesion.

    - Wizbang made an interesting point on another thread about using red oak for laminations ... the red oak soaks up epoxy and glues well. If it's encapsulated then its sponge-like open cells aren't such a big deal, I suppose, and they might even be considered a pro.

    - Wizbang's gonna do what Wizbang's gonna do. I've always liked that.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    832

    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post

    - Isn't soaking up red oak with epoxy a false economy? As in, wouldn't it just be cheaper/more efficient to get more rot resistant material to start with and not have to pickle it with a really expensive two-part goo? There's no shame in letting a wooden boat be a wooden boat. I don't get the point of putting epoxy on everything. It's not paint. It's for adhesion.

    .
    I would be right there with you were it not for the fact that the red oak is free. As I recall the idea was to find a way to use the free material in a reasonably pleasing way? IE: Something that floats. It would seem that for that application, the use of epoxy might be justified.

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Tim,
    I do not find epoxy to be expensive. Freakin decent latex paint is $60 a gallon.
    Yer buyin into mcmullifins credo" I do not paint with glue and I do not glue with paint"..or something like that.
    But epoxy IS "paint"..it is the very best "coating"to put on a wood (or steel,aluminum, fiberglass ,)period .
    The best timber and the best plywood and the best fastenings do not NEED epoxy, they are fine without it. (like your fine small craft, built of the best wood and metal)
    But my boat , for example, built of Mt St Helens fir..it has a TERRIBLE reputation for disintegrating after 5 or 10 years... and then there are the 7000 galvanized fastenings in Woodwind....the epoxy makes the second rate wood and fastenings credible.
    i forget what we were tawkin about

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    In all fairness, I think you can also blame Hvalsoe for my uppity attitude. McMullet certainly hasn't helped the situation.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Yea, Eric is well known for building boats of crap materials too.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
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    11,468

    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Time was, back before cargo containers when there was a lot more break-bulk cargo, a lot of the dunnage that would come off ships from Asia was teak and other now-exotic hardwoods. (We used to make teepees out of 12" lengths of 2" bamboo which came from the carpet store. The rugs came rolled on them.) The Asian shippers didn't seem to care if it was select stock or not, either. My dad told me some of the stevedores on the Embarcadero in San Francisco would grab the good stuff and bring it home for hobby use. Now they make pallets out of old soda bottles and plastic bags. I'm guessing our grandkids won't ever see a wooden pallet outside of a museum.



    Anybody remember how useful these used to be?









    The first place of my own in college was furnished entirely with this sort of scrounged and repurposed stuff. I remember my parents hauling my infant brother and sisters around in those banana boxes. They fit well in the back seat of the car in the days before baby carriers and seatbelts. We all had bedside tables that were orange crates standing on end. They sold covers for them at the five and ten. None of this stuff cost anything. Now they are all "decorator items" and Pottery Barn, Crate and Barrel, and Restoration Hardware want an arm and a leg for fake imitations made overseas. Maybe you should save one of those oak pallets for posterity.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
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    Shoreline, Washington
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Yea, Eric is well known for building boats of crap materials too.
    Oh please at least add an imogee.

    Epoxy is its own peculiar tedium and penance. Gotta love it gotta hate it.

    I have heard tell of builders using red oak, but not so much in these regions.

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