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Thread: Reclaimed red oak

  1. #36
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    A couple thoughts about epoxy and red oak.

    - Isn't soaking up red oak with epoxy a false economy? As in, wouldn't it just be cheaper/more efficient to get more rot resistant material to start with and not have to pickle it with a really expensive two-part goo? There's no shame in letting a wooden boat be a wooden boat. I don't get the point of putting epoxy on everything. It's not paint. It's for adhesion.

    - Wizbang made an interesting point on another thread about using red oak for laminations ... the red oak soaks up epoxy and glues well. If it's encapsulated then its sponge-like open cells aren't such a big deal, I suppose, and they might even be considered a pro.

    - Wizbang's gonna do what Wizbang's gonna do. I've always liked that.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  2. #37
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    Apr 2015
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Quote Originally Posted by Yeadon View Post

    - Isn't soaking up red oak with epoxy a false economy? As in, wouldn't it just be cheaper/more efficient to get more rot resistant material to start with and not have to pickle it with a really expensive two-part goo? There's no shame in letting a wooden boat be a wooden boat. I don't get the point of putting epoxy on everything. It's not paint. It's for adhesion.

    .
    I would be right there with you were it not for the fact that the red oak is free. As I recall the idea was to find a way to use the free material in a reasonably pleasing way? IE: Something that floats. It would seem that for that application, the use of epoxy might be justified.

  3. #38
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    Oct 2009
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Tim,
    I do not find epoxy to be expensive. Freakin decent latex paint is $60 a gallon.
    Yer buyin into mcmullifins credo" I do not paint with glue and I do not glue with paint"..or something like that.
    But epoxy IS "paint"..it is the very best "coating"to put on a wood (or steel,aluminum, fiberglass ,)period .
    The best timber and the best plywood and the best fastenings do not NEED epoxy, they are fine without it. (like your fine small craft, built of the best wood and metal)
    But my boat , for example, built of Mt St Helens fir..it has a TERRIBLE reputation for disintegrating after 5 or 10 years... and then there are the 7000 galvanized fastenings in Woodwind....the epoxy makes the second rate wood and fastenings credible.
    i forget what we were tawkin about

  4. #39
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    In all fairness, I think you can also blame Hvalsoe for my uppity attitude. McMullet certainly hasn't helped the situation.
    Quote Originally Posted by James McMullen View Post
    Yeadon is right, of course.

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Yea, Eric is well known for building boats of crap materials too.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
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    San Francisco Bay
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Time was, back before cargo containers when there was a lot more break-bulk cargo, a lot of the dunnage that would come off ships from Asia was teak and other now-exotic hardwoods. (We used to make teepees out of 12" lengths of 2" bamboo which came from the carpet store. The rugs came rolled on them.) The Asian shippers didn't seem to care if it was select stock or not, either. My dad told me some of the stevedores on the Embarcadero in San Francisco would grab the good stuff and bring it home for hobby use. Now they make pallets out of old soda bottles and plastic bags. I'm guessing our grandkids won't ever see a wooden pallet outside of a museum.



    Anybody remember how useful these used to be?









    The first place of my own in college was furnished entirely with this sort of scrounged and repurposed stuff. I remember my parents hauling my infant brother and sisters around in those banana boxes. They fit well in the back seat of the car in the days before baby carriers and seatbelts. We all had bedside tables that were orange crates standing on end. They sold covers for them at the five and ten. None of this stuff cost anything. Now they are all "decorator items" and Pottery Barn, Crate and Barrel, and Restoration Hardware want an arm and a leg for fake imitations made overseas. Maybe you should save one of those oak pallets for posterity.

  7. #42
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    Dec 2005
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    Shoreline, Washington
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    Yea, Eric is well known for building boats of crap materials too.
    Oh please at least add an imogee.

    Epoxy is its own peculiar tedium and penance. Gotta love it gotta hate it.

    I have heard tell of builders using red oak, but not so much in these regions.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    Paulden, AZ, USA
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    84

    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    I found a use for some of it,but most was white that i found when looking at the pile closer.
    I made a pair of blocks for the sheet line, I wanted to get rid of the ugly Big box store hardware and add some leverage so that my grand daughters could sail as well. and I made duckboards for the bottom.
    getting the 3/8"x2" pieces out of the 4x4's was a real chore with only a skill saw and thickness plane but it worked out in the end.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  9. #44
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    Nov 2004
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    I know a guy who made a fiddle using red oak for the sides and bottom and red cedar for the top plate. It has a bad tone! But, he is happy! So if you are happy with red oak, then use it and, perhaps, give a report on how long it lasted when it rots out taking away your labor, money and sailing enjoyment!

    I only hope it doesn't do what the boat I replaced the chine log in did! It sank, out from under the owner his wife and young daughter when rowing to the boat from the beach in Lady's Cove at Santa Cruz Island. Luckily the owner saved his wife and child and I got the repair job!

    You are the only one you need to please!

    Jay aka Bird
    Last edited by Jay Greer; 05-07-2018 at 02:02 PM.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
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    Paulden, AZ, USA
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    84

    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I know a guy who made a fiddle using red oak for the sides and bottom and red cedar for the top plate. It has a bad tone! But, he is happy! So if you are happy with red oak, then use it and, perhaps, give a report on how long it lasted when it rots out taking away your labor, money and sailing enjoyment!

    I only hope it doesn't do what the boat I replaced the chine log in did! It sank, out from under the owner his wife and young daughter when rowing to shore from the beach in Lady's Cove at Santa Cruz Island. Luckily the owner saved his wife and child and I got the repair job!

    You are the only one you need to please!

    Jay aka Bird
    Time will tell I figured the part is something that will get beat up from use and is not attached to the boat so all I'm out is my time and being disabled with a very limited budget but all day to every day to kill no big deal. I also need time working wood before I start on my boat build.I'm a machinist with 38 years in the field so building things of all types is nothing new but wood is a fairly new medium for me and any time spent making sawdust is time well spent when looking at the big picture. FWIF 3 of the 9 planks are red oak and after gluing it it was all treated/finished as a unit so it will be a good experiment as to longevity of the two woods.

  11. #46
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    Nov 2004
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    Port Townsend WA
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    Default Re: Reclaimed red oak

    When I was a kid, just over four years of age, my Dad was soldering some wires on the family car. He was using a soldering iron that he had heated to white hot with a blow torch. Dad said, "Don't touch that Jay, it's hot!" Dumb me, I had no clue as to what he meant by what that kind of hot meant! So,I grabbed the white hot end! You can imagine the rest! A warning, even when given with kindness, when ignored can, end up having a bad result! But, we can learn, a lot, from our mistakes!

    I wish you good fortune and God's speed with your project!

    Jay

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