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Thread: Saw horse test

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
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    New Zealand's Far North
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    7,715

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    In this part of the world they were called sawstools. This video shows ones fairly similar to what I am used to. The fore and aft splayed legs add a lot of stability.
    They were generally made in pairs.

    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    dfw
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    1,076

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by Nicholas Carey View Post
    Hmmm. Today's post over on Chris Schwartz's Lost Art Press blog is on this very topic. Sawhorses built with nought but a framing square (well, bevel gauge... but you could do it with a framing square), a saw and a chisel. And some screws.

    https://blog.lostartpress.com/2018/0...-thanksgiving/

    THESE HORSES ARE GREAT!!!

    meet the original brief(pass between 2 studs) AND STACK

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
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    15,851

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Usually I only have sawhorses that fold flat but I could see having some of these.

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    8,082

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I've been toting these around for too long. Nice and simple, stack nicely. The top plank is Red Oak and the legs are Honduras Mahogany, from back when it was cheap. You can stack two feet of plywood on them, but I don't do that anymore. They were originaly screwed together, but last year they were getting loose, so I unscrewed them and glued them up with PL Premium, screwed them back together. Good for another round.



  5. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Vancouver Island
    Posts
    1,680

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    " Nice and simple, stack nicely."

    This is the design I use also. As a framer the legs would be ripped from offcuts of 3/4" plyfloor sheathing and the plank would be 2x6 edged as shown, pl300 and 2-1/4" gun-nailed, 6" ply gussets outboard of the legs. Wide enough to stand on and work, and stable. Make one plank length 6" shorter and they will stack as well as the one's above. About an hour to make a pair, with a skilsaw. / Jim

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    881

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Failed on photo.


    [IMG]IMGP0527[/IMG]
    Last edited by Chippie; 03-30-2018 at 05:11 AM.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    cincinnati, ohio, USA
    Posts
    214

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I built a set of Shopdog saw horses, they are incredibly stable and can handle a lot of weight. They can be pretty versatile as well as shown on his website. They fold up to a small package and are cheap to make.
    http://www.woodshopdude.com/index.html

    I always thought that these horses that I saved from the internet years ago are pretty cute.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    Waterbury Center, Vermont
    Posts
    34

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I make the horses for our company the way my dad did. The top chord is a 2x6 ripped at 15 degrees. Leave the lumberyard radius at the bottom to help with slivers. The legs are 5/4x6 clear pine beveled at 15 degrees top and bottom, 35” long so you get 4 from a 12’. 1x4 cleats hold up a shelf. The spacing of the shelf is such that a circular saw can be set there between cuts. All parts are screwed together. Anyone who cuts into the saw horse is roundly ridiculed.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Jan 2000
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    15,851

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Those shopdog legs could be made from 1x4s instead of 2x4s. Keep the 2x for the top piece.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    ParrySound
    Posts
    27

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    equine dreams.....anybody

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    881

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by swoody126 View Post
    Chippie, is this what you are referring to?





    please note NO METALIC FASTENERS on the top/working surface

    knot to mention STOUT AS ALL GETOUT!

    sw

    Yes, the "slot" at the top was as I said "tapered " to accommodate different door thicknesses.


    Lots of the above examples are "support trestles" in my opinion they lack what swoody terms " please note NO METALIC FASTENERS on the top/working surface " usually 4" approx.
    Last edited by Chippie; 04-14-2018 at 05:02 PM.

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Location
    Emerald Coast, FL
    Posts
    446

    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Carpenter's trestles, made from off cuts, came across the idea in the book Farm Mechanics (1918).









    FMI: Carpenter's Trestle

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