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Thread: Saw horse test

  1. #1
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    Default Saw horse test

    I've heard that in the old days, a carpenter helper might be hired after being tasked with building a saw horse using a hammer, nails, a saw, and I suppose a carpenter's square.

    What would that saw horse look like? Would it need to have legs cut with top angles that matched the to plate and similarly matched cross bars that were calculated and not just cut flush after? Or was hacked together sufficient if it was in compression in the right places and tension in the right places?

    I'm going to build a be pair tomorrow. I am petty fond of the last set I built that break down to store flat. But I'd like to learn something traditional.

    Thanks

    Tom

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I made u a few of these from CLC's site, but I modified them so the tenon goes through and is pinned so I can take them apart: https://www.clcboats.com/shoptips/st...es_slings.html I need to make some more, but shorter.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    What kind of saw horse Logging/ first/second fixing/ panelling --- ?

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I think it depended if they were to be painted or finished bright and also on if they were to have gronicles mounted or not.
    If one advances confidently in the direction of his dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in common hours.
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Back in the day when a new man came on the crew he was told to build a pair of sawhorses by coffee time. Any good framer could bang out a pair in two hours. 2x6 top 1x6 legs, 2x4 braces. Legs splayed no wider than 14 1/2" so they can fit between wall studs for easy moving around. More than one guy got sent packing for not being able.

    The really good ones had a slot cut in one top so it could be used as a rip bench. But that was back when we still used hand saws....

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    Back in the day when a new man came on the crew he was told to build a pair of sawhorses by coffee time. Any good framer could bang out a pair in two hours. 2x6 top 1x6 legs, 2x4 braces. Legs splayed no wider than 14 1/2" so they can fit between wall studs for easy moving around. More than one guy got sent packing for not being able.

    The really good ones had a slot cut in one top so it could be used as a rip bench. But that was back when we still used hand saws....
    knot only being able to thread one thru stud walls butt knot having any nail heads on the top(knot an "I" beam)

    the framing contractor i worked for insisted the tops be made in an inverted "T" so the skill saw blades(no carbide tips back then) could knot reach a nail

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedog225 View Post
    I've heard that in the old days, a carpenter helper might be hired after being tasked with building a saw horse using a hammer, nails, a saw, and I suppose a carpenter's square.

    What would that saw horse look like? Would it need to have legs cut with top angles that matched the to plate and similarly matched cross bars that were calculated and not just cut flush after? Or was hacked together sufficient if it was in compression in the right places and tension in the right places?

    I'm going to build a be pair tomorrow. I am petty fond of the last set I built that break down to store flat. But I'd like to learn something traditional.

    Thanks

    Tom
    Tom, saw horses that fold/lay flat is an issue for many home DIYers look for(me 2)

    so many folks are stuck on 2x4/2x6 construction because they think it is necessary to hold a load

    some friends i cook with have proven the 2x construction method to knot be necessary in most instances/circumstances

    they showed me that 4-legged horses made of 1x4's and hinged at the top will hold some really heavy loads(cast iron dutch ovens full of food) and fold flat to 1 1/2"(2 1/4" thicknesses/pair)

    after seeing several examples of these 1x4 horses i tried making some that are 3-legged

    the criteria is to be able to hold <8'(lay flat in the back of my pick up) table tops made of 2-1x12's

    roughly a 2'x8' table

    here is the lay out for the legs which are hinged at the top



    with the cross braces placed just so 2 horses can be layed flat taking up only 2 1/4" of depth and by staggering them 2 sets lay flat in the truck bed

    the ultimate goal of having 2-8' tables w/ a 6' shelf underneath



    this design works well on dirt and simply require a rope tether between the leg braces when used on smooth surfaces

    when working on uneven surfaces like so many folks end up doing under their back yard boat building tents the 3-legged horses can virtually always be leveled/balanced

    the design specs can be adapted to just about any dimensions required for a project and the lumber required is common 1x4's

    for a 2' wide 30"-35" high horse it only takes 3-1x4x6'(treated lumber is usually the clearest @ our local big box stores) and 2 butt hinges(i used used door hinges from the flea mkt) along w/ a fist full of screws/nails

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Indeed they would have to have a tray.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    Back in the day when a new man came on the crew he was told to build a pair of sawhorses by coffee time. Any good framer could bang out a pair in two hours. 2x6 top 1x6 legs, 2x4 braces. Legs splayed no wider than 14 1/2" so they can fit between wall studs for easy moving around. More than one guy got sent packing for not being able.

    The really good ones had a slot cut in one top so it could be used as a rip bench. But that was back when we still used hand saws....

    And Pull Saws were unheard of.

    Which leads me to ask, how would you approach constructing a saw horse for pull saws?

    The "cut out" at one end at the top was always tapered too,to take a door on edge for dressing when fitting doors.

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quick and easy to build. Rock solid.

    horses.jpg

    Building them requires a tape measure, saw, hammer and nails (i used screws). All of the 2x4s are cut to 32" to get 3 pieces out of an 8 footer. It also makes a working height that is easy on my bum back. I cut angles on the legs to match the angles where they sit on the ground and where they butt against the top, but it's not necessary.

    The frame pictured behind them provides provides a 4' x 8' work surface. It can be temporarily screwed to the horses for extra stability. I haven't found that to be necessary. I sometimes screw the frame down just to make it easier to pick up the whole contraption and move it.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    And Pull Saws were unheard of.

    Which leads me to ask, how would you approach constructing a saw horse for pull saws?

    The "cut out" at one end at the top was always tapered too,to take a door on edge for dressing when fitting doors.
    Chippie, is this what you are referring to?





    please note NO METALIC FASTENERS on the top/working surface

    knot to mention STOUT AS ALL GETOUT!

    sw
    "we are the people, our parents warned us about" (jb)

    steve

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I've made and used these for years. Simple, quick to make, lightweight, and can be made from scrap:

    Sawhorse.jpg

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by swoody126 View Post








    sw
    Very cool. Thanks!
    Last edited by bluedog225; 03-28-2018 at 09:59 AM.

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Nice examples. Thanks all!

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    And Pull Saws were unheard of.

    Which leads me to ask, how would you approach constructing a saw horse for pull saws?
    Simple. Japan is not a chair culture. Your body is the clamp.





    And when you've got to work... bigger stuff... it's not a huge difference:



    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by SchoonerRat View Post
    Quick and easy to build. Rock solid.

    horses.jpg

    Building them requires a tape measure, saw, hammer and nails (i used screws). All of the 2x4s are cut to 32" to get 3 pieces out of an 8 footer. It also makes a working height that is easy on my bum back. I cut angles on the legs to match the angles where they sit on the ground and where they butt against the top, but it's not necessary.

    The frame pictured behind them provides provides a 4' x 8' work surface. It can be temporarily screwed to the horses for extra stability. I haven't found that to be necessary. I sometimes screw the frame down just to make it easier to pick up the whole contraption and move it.
    Built 3 of these 11 years ago, still going strong. added bonus, they stack well.
    Disbelief in magic can force a poor soul into believing in government and business.
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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    We build similar but with legs splayed two ways and with gussets for each leg pair. 50-some of these in the shop see hard use.

    sawhorses.jpg

    Compound cut for the legs is 15 deg. for both angles. 31 inch leg long point to short makes the top about 30 inches from the floor. Top board (our standard ones are 48") extends past the other beam pieces for more clamping options.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Still have to make these at my trade school, legs are mortise in at a compound angle.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I use ones like this. Very strong, just takes a few minutes to knock out a pair.

    24EB808B-57D1-49C8-82E1-CC5110E6DB01.jpeg

    Great way to practice your mortises.


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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    I use ones like this. Very strong, just takes a few minutes to knock out a pair.

    24EB808B-57D1-49C8-82E1-CC5110E6DB01.jpeg

    Great way to practice your mortises.

    Has the look of a French carpenter apprentice's chef-d'oeuvres model.

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by J P View Post
    We build similar but with legs splayed two ways and with gussets for each leg pair. 50-some of these in the shop see hard use.

    sawhorses.jpg

    Compound cut for the legs is 15 deg. for both angles. 31 inch leg long point to short makes the top about 30 inches from the floor. Top board (our standard ones are 48") extends past the other beam pieces for more clamping options.
    I thought about splaying my legs (ooohhh, that sounds painful), but I just didn't want to spend the extra time. They're rock solid the way they are. I do like the longer top plate on your horses. That easy re-fit will be done the next time I use them. It will be soon, I'm now in the process of taking the 30' shipping container that's currently storing my tools, and making it into a 30' X 8' shop. A shop with those dimensions requires a bit of creativity. Right now, the use of my table saw or my radial arm or my jointer or my ....... requires some time driving a fork-lift. With these horses the 2x4 frame and a bit of 3/4" ply, I've got a convenient temporary outdoor workbench.
    Schooner captains love to get blown offshore!

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    basil

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    As a young man, I got a job working construction - first thing the boss told me to do was go build a couple of saw horses. They sure wouldn't have fit between any studs . . . .

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    Quote Originally Posted by DGentry View Post
    As a young man, I got a job working construction - first thing the boss told me to do was go build a couple of saw horses. They sure wouldn't have fit between any studs . . . .
    Must say that I wondered about that.

    If it were to pass through all we did was turn it on it's side, pass one side legs through, then "rotate" the other side legs through.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    [QUOTE=Nicholas Carey;5519532]Simple. Japan is not a chair culture. Your body is the clamp.




    And when you've got to work... bigger stuff... it's not a huge difference:



    [/QUOTE

    Is it only me that thinks that sawing with that body stance would be quite tiring quite quickly?

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Nothing wrong with building wooden sawhorses. Fun to do, and good practice for beginning woodworkers. And there certainly are some nifty plans available.

    But I should mention that, as a professional, wooden sawhorses don't work as well as good-quality folding plastic ones. I've got a suite of a dozen that have lasted me for 20+ years of heavy usage. They fold flat for compact storage. They're very light for moving around the shop, or out on a dock or back shed. They carry a surprising amount of weight. And I certainly couldn't build them (since, as a business, I must value my labor) for what I paid for even the top-quality folding ones. And this model has a nifty little top pocket to receive replaceable 2X2's - though that's not strictly required, you can rig something similarly sacrificial with most of 'em.

    Here's an image of several strung together to carry the bed of my spar lathe --

    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Only way I've seen it done in 30 years . Studs in Calif. are on 16 inch centers leaving 14 1/2 inches between. That would be a pretty narrow sawhorse but I imagine they would still work. I think maybe the non earthquake prone areas still use 24 inches.
    Quote Originally Posted by Chippie View Post
    Must say that I wondered about that.

    If it were to pass through all we did was turn it on it's side, pass one side legs through, then "rotate" the other side legs through.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    This is what I do with the exception that I add a piece of ply scrap under the i beam as a gusset. I make a new pair every job and give them to the homeowner when I leave. They love it.
    Quote Originally Posted by SchoonerRat View Post
    Quick and easy to build. Rock solid.

    horses.jpg

    Building them requires a tape measure, saw, hammer and nails (i used screws). All of the 2x4s are cut to 32" to get 3 pieces out of an 8 footer. It also makes a working height that is easy on my bum back. I cut angles on the legs to match the angles where they sit on the ground and where they butt against the top, but it's not necessary.

    The frame pictured behind them provides provides a 4' x 8' work surface. It can be temporarily screwed to the horses for extra stability. I haven't found that to be necessary. I sometimes screw the frame down just to make it easier to pick up the whole contraption and move it.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Nothing wrong with building wooden sawhorses. Fun to do, and good practice for beginning woodworkers. And there certainly are some nifty plans available.

    But I should mention that, as a professional, wooden sawhorses don't work as well as good-quality folding plastic ones. I've got a suite of a dozen that have lasted me for 20+ years of heavy usage. They fold flat for compact storage. They're very light for moving around the shop, or out on a dock or back shed. They carry a surprising amount of weight. And I certainly couldn't build them (since, as a business, I must value my labor) for what I paid for even the top-quality folding ones. And this model has a nifty little top pocket to receive replaceable 2X2's - though that's not strictly required, you can rig something similarly sacrificial with most of 'em.
    Good to know. I've only bought the cheap ones and they are miserable. I'll look into a nice pair.

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    I've been shocked more than once by how much stuff was stacked on those folding saw horses David G is talking about, they are stout.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    When you say "good quality" do you mean Stanley or am I in the wrong neighborhood?

    https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-STST6.../dp/B00AKZ5U0A

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    Default Saw horse test

    I built four of these out my scrap barrel about 18 years ago when I built my garage. This one lives outside all the time and gets all kinds of use. They stack, but do note that the gussets will not allow them to stack as compactly as they otherwise might.Clamps hang conveniently at the ready from the crosspieces.




    Here's made with one-by. These shorties support my skiff and live outside. About seven years old. Porch paint and cheap lumber. These make good step stools when not supporting a wooden boat.




    Kevin




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    Last edited by Breakaway; 03-28-2018 at 12:21 PM.
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    Default Re: Saw horse test

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedog225 View Post
    When you say "good quality" do you mean Stanley or am I in the wrong neighborhood?

    https://www.amazon.com/Stanley-STST6.../dp/B00AKZ5U0A
    I bet those would work fine. I'd probably be more inclined to go for the FatMax versions. I don't see the exact type I own, but they probably don't make 'em anymore.

    Also looks like Rigid makes one that seems stout - https://www.homedepot.com/p/RIDGID-3...0710/302917754
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  34. #34
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    Default Saw horse test

    Hmmm. Today's post over on Chris Schwartz's Lost Art Press blog is on this very topic. Sawhorses built with nought but a framing square (well, bevel gauge... but you could do it with a framing square), a saw and a chisel. And some screws.

    https://blog.lostartpress.com/2018/0...-thanksgiving/

    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  35. #35
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    Default Saw horse test

    These are a wee bit twee, but you have to admire the effort.

    https://www.woodsmithplans.com/plan/...lat-sawhorses/



    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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