Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,007

    Default 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    25,770

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Cool, but I am surprised they feel they can identify the type specifically.

  3. #3

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Fedco is a great seed, plant, and tree supplier they also sponsor a big Scion swap to help keep these old apples alive and well.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    47,606

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    cool

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    huntsville, al, usa
    Posts
    3,105

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    where can i get me a republican pippin tree?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    21,577

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Although shiny and bright on the outside, they are incredibly sour, you wouldn't like it.

  7. #7

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Not sure if it's Republican and your to late for this year but next year perhaps

    https://www.fedcoseeds.com/trees/?item=129

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Bangor, ME
    Posts
    23,762

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Johnny Appleseed was said to have traversed where I grew up in Ohio. A combination of mythic and real, he's a bit hard to grasp historically. Maybe one of the original hippies? Clearly eccentric.Gotta love it.

    https://youtu.be/iDw88ijgdOo

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,007

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Every fall, a large local nursery hosts an 'apple tasting' event. Tons of varieties (most of which they sell, of course), and a fun time. I try not to miss it. And more diverse orchards are being planted around here - including some heirloom varieties. It's nice to see more choices finding their way onto the shelves, and fun to indulge in.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    21,577

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Quote Originally Posted by ishmael View Post
    Johnny Appleseed was said to have traversed where I grew up in Ohio. A combination of mythic and real, he's a bit hard to grasp historically. Maybe one of the original hippies? Clearly eccentric.Gotta love it.

    https://youtu.be/iDw88ijgdOo
    Naw, he was just a homeless drunk.
    Apples in his era were for making cider, a cheap alcoholic beverage everyone drank it.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb 2001
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    10,194

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    Naw, he was just a homeless drunk.
    Apples in his era were for making cider, a cheap alcoholic beverage everyone drank it.

    Not at all. Hard working business man. Under the Northwest Ordinance of 1787 opened up the Northwest Territories — land we got from England as part of the 1783 Treaty of Paris that ended the recent unpleasantness with England — to settlement (never mind the people who lived there, but I digress).

    So you could move out their and prove a homestead of 160 acres. Among other things, to prove your claim, you had to build a house, reside on and work the land for something like 7 years. And... to show intent to stay, you had to establish an orchard, reason being that it took several years of work before you got anything out of it. And, the settlers wanted their [hard] cider.

    [might be a bit fuzzy on the details. It's been a long time since I had to learn that stuff in the Cincinnati public schools]

    John Chapman — Johnny Appleseed — was a seedsman and orchardman from Pennsylvania. Had a nursery there. He saw the demand for Apple seedlings, so he filled it, bringing loads of seedlings to the Northwest Territories to sell to the settlers.

    Not crazy in the least. Just old-fashioned American entrepreneurial spirit.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,007

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    We've been thinking about planting another tree. Somewhere. We're kinda tight on space at this point. But here's the list of availables. I'm thinking maybe Empire, or Liberty. I think my sweetie will lobby for something tarter. Anyone have experience/opinions?

    https://portlandnursery.com/docs/fruits/Apples.pdf
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    26,629

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    I've often wondered about the Johnny Appleseed story.

    Apple trees can be grown from seed. The question is why would you want to do so?

    Apples do not reproduce true to type, meaning that the tree from the seed will produce apples that are almost certain to be different than the parent.

    Most apple varieties are self-unfruitful, which means their blossoms must be fertilized with the pollen of a separate variety in order to achieve good fruit set. The fruit produced will be the same as the parent tree, but the seeds will be a cross between the two varieties.

    Also, almost all varieties are unable to pollinate themselves. They rely on insects like bees to transfer pollen. Unless you pollinate the tree yourself by hand, there is no way to know who the other parent variety is.

    There's a very good chance the apples won't even be edible. Many apple trees are pollinated by crabapples, which are usually small and inedible. Also, while it might be edible, that doesn't mean it will taste great. The chances of getting a truly tasty apple are very small.

    Apple trees from seed take longer to produce fruit. It usually takes about 7-10 years before one can even tell if one is lucky and has good fruit.
    War is peace.
    Freedom is slavery.
    Ignorance is strength.
    Trump is doing beautifully.





  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Central Coast, Ca
    Posts
    21,577

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Johnny Appleseed, from the Smithsonian...

    https://www.smithsonianmag.com/arts-...ier-180953263/

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Mukilteo, WA
    Posts
    1,906

    Default Re: 'Extinct' apple varieties rediscovered

    Johnny Appleseed planted from seed, specifically for cider. They would not have been edible for eating. He slept outside most of the time, moving into the wilderness several years ahead of the settlers, so he would have saplings to sell them. More like a hermit than a hippie. It is believed that he started millions of trees, and some of the edible varieties we have almost certainly were new varieties from his seeds.

    These are the facts as I remember them.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •