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Thread: Forgotten English

  1. #1
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    Default Forgotten English

    I have mentioned here before that my sister annually gives me a page-per-day calendar called Forgotten English; words that are no longer in common use. Some should be revived, IMHO...


    chrematistics: The science of wealth. From Greek chremata, wealth. - John Ridpath's Home Reference Library, 1898

    furk: To expel, to be furked, to be expelled; Winchester School Glossary - William Cope's Gloddary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    walt: The ship is walt - that is, wants ballast. - Capt. John Smith's Sea Grammar and Accidence for Young Seamen, 1627


    These old words can be effectively used in sentences with modern themes, as in:

    President Trump should be furked because he is focusing too much on personal chrematistics, making the ship of state walt.


    <grin>
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Well spoken!

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Or in the vernacular, furk Trump, or we're f--ked. (P.S.- spellcheck is unfamiliar with "furk")

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    I have mentioned here before that my sister annually gives me a page-per-day calendar called Forgotten English; words that are no longer in common use. Some should be revived, IMHO...


    chrematistics: The science of wealth. From Greek chremata, wealth. - John Ridpath's Home Reference Library, 1898

    furk: To expel, to be furked, to be expelled; Winchester School Glossary - William Cope's Gloddary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    walt: The ship is walt - that is, wants ballast. - Capt. John Smith's Sea Grammar and Accidence for Young Seamen, 1627


    These old words can be effectively used in sentences with modern themes, as in:

    President Trump should be furked because he is focusing too much on personal chrematistics, making the ship of state walt.


    <grin>
    The correct spelling is 'Firk'.

    It was still in use when I was at the school (Winchester College) in the early '70s. There were dictionaries of the school's dialect - known as 'Notions' which had to be learned in your first term (aged 13); in my grandfather's day these 'Notions Books' were a couple of inches thick; by my time, thankfully, it was a slim pamphlet !
    Nick

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    I only copy what I have in front of me, Nick. Thanks for the 'insider' correction.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    I only copy what I have in front of me, Nick. Thanks for the 'insider' correction.
    I suspect that the spelling was flexible back in the 1880s ! I've just checked Grandfather's Notions Book (1910 and full of pencil marks from his learning by rote) and it was Firk by then. From the book, how about:

    'Balk' - a false report
    'Blow' - to blush
    'Brock' - a bullying act or to bully
    'Chinner' - a grin
    'Clow' a box on the ear or to box a person's ears.

    Want more ?
    Nick

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Yes, please.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Quote Originally Posted by Whameller View Post
    'Balk' - a false report
    Interesting. In US Baseball a balk is an intent by the pitcher to pitch when he doesn't. Always curious the origin of the term.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh Conway View Post
    Interesting. In US Baseball a balk is an intent by the pitcher to pitch when he doesn't. Always curious the origin of the term.
    It is interesting how word meanings drift. Balk is now refuse, as a horse might balk at jumping a fence.
    The word chuffed reversed its meaning between the trenches in WWI and the '80s.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    First 'Furk', then 'Firk', and now 'Fork' is lost to a generation that knows only how to eat with it's hands out of styrofoam and cardboard boxes.
    There is no rational, logical, or physical description of how free will could exist. It therefore makes no sense to praise or condemn anyone on the grounds they are a free willed self that made one choice but could have chosen something else. There is no evidence that such a situation is possible in our Universe. Demonstrate otherwise and I will be thrilled.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Some more from Grandfather's Notions Book:

    Frout - angry
    Glope - to spit
    Mug - to work (noun - Mugging)
    Purl - to dive
    Quill - to curry favour, flatter
    Nick

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Quote Originally Posted by Whameller View Post
    Some more from Grandfather's Notions Book:

    Frout - angry
    Glope - to spit
    Mug - to work (noun - Mugging)
    Purl - to dive
    Quill - to curry favour, flatter
    I see "purl" still in occasional use, applied to a sailing boat running downwind in a hard blow and the force of the wind on the rig putting her bow under, as in " she purled". Not commonly used but I've seen it more than once.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    ^ We still mug up on stuff. Appropriate for a schools dialect.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  14. #14
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Quote Originally Posted by john welsford View Post
    I see "purl" still in occasional use, applied to a sailing boat running downwind in a hard blow and the force of the wind on the rig putting her bow under, as in " she purled". Not commonly used but I've seen it more than once.

    John Welsford
    yep, going for a purler is suffering a spectacular fall.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    Fascinating!
    Skip

    ---This post is delivered with righteous passion and with a solemn southern directness --
    ...........fighting against the deliberate polarization of politics...

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Forgotten English

    There has got to be a good song in all of this...

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