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Thread: Rangeley questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    Default Rangeley questions

    I've just about convinced myself into building one. Been looking at a set of plans for strip from Newfound. Weight is a major factor as it will be on a rack over my truck cab. Not getting any response on questions to Newfound, so if anyone familiar with Rangeley boats could help I'd appreciate it. The 15' is listed at 100#, seems like a lot for that size boat. Maybe doing away with transom and making it a double ender, thin out the decks, change the seats to just slats with a lightweight seat? Anyone build one and know the actual weight? Also if you were to paint the outside versus going for a full weave fill and multi coats of varnish, would the difference be negligible? Thanks!

  2. #2

    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    If your going to eliminate the transom you might also look at Adirondack guide boats.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    21

    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Smith porter maine View Post
    If your going to eliminate the transom you might also look at Adirondack guide boats.
    I have Chris, the Rangeley appears to be the most stable of the two which is also important to me. I really hate to lose the transom, I think that's part of the appeal of the Rangeley.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
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    5,322

    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    Short of building it SOF it's about as light as it can be.

    Try some variation of this...


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    Considering the trim level on their display sample, the 95 lb. weight doesn't seem excessive at all. One thing about stripping rowboat-sized boats as opposed to canoes - the extra beam can be a serious problem from the standpoint of generating adequate hull stiffness. Strippers don't do the flex thing very well. They break. What may be perfectly adequate on a 34" wide canoe may be a very different story on a rowboat which is 10" or 12" wider. If you are building a proven design with that method I would be very careful about straying from the dimensions, construction details and scantlings which have been tested and shown to work.

    Wood strip/fiberglass building will usually produce a hull which is lighter than most traditional building techniques, lighter than a lot of production techniques, and usually only surpassed by some hot-shot advanced composite boats. Yet for some strange reason, an awful lot of beginning stripper builders aren't satisfied with those weights and blindly start attempting to cut corners to reduce the boat's weight. Most of the time, this is a mistake and it often results in a short-lived boat with serious structural problems from day one. A boat like this doesn't contain an awful lot of excess stuff. Be very careful what you take out of it. It might be a much better idea to build the boat as designed and modify your car-top and loading systems instead.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Capt.Redfish View Post
    I have Chris, the Rangeley appears to be the most stable of the two which is also important to me. I really hate to lose the transom, I think that's part of the appeal of the Rangeley.
    Remember that the original Rangeleys were double ended. It was only with the advent of gas outboards that someone decided to whack off the aft end and put in a transom. That transom does look sweet, though.
    It's still on my short list of next-boat-to-build.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  7. #7
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    Apr 1999
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    Hyannis, MA, USA
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    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    Gib, and I thought some of my cartop gizmos were slick. Finastkind.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    The 15' double ended Rushton rowing boat I built came in at 80 pounds. That wasn't strip planked, though. It was glued lap using 4mm marine ply.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Angeles
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    69

    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    I have a strip two-man rowing boat, 24' by 39". Originally was going to use just red cedar but then used paulownia (lighter, still strong) for half the strips (in my case, above the waterline; alternating the two woods might be better. In either case careful, even sanding is needed to avoid uneveness). It's very light and with 4oz S glass (as strong as 6oz E glass but lighter) on each side, super stiff. Todd's comment about width being an issue is a point but paulownia is something to consider to remove a surprising amount of weight. You can also select cedar boards that are obviously lighter than others to minimize cedar weight.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2013
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    21

    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    Good ideas, I'm going to order the plans if they ever get back to me. Probably can thin the transom some, no plans to use a motor. I have lots of eastern white cedar, may sort out the lighter sap wood to use for strips. Can probably lighten the seats a little, will look into the 4oz.s glass, at least for sides. This will be stripper# 5 for me, the Rangeley has been at the top of my list for some time. Appreciate the help!

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
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    Sonoma County
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    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    I'm assuming you are concerned about weight for the problem of solo loading/unloading, not the integrity of your roof rack? I got around that by building a little two wheeled dolly that i'd drop the transom of my boat onto off the roof rack of my car. This allows you to tilt, then roll until you can get the boat over the ground. Then put the whole thing down, lift one end and push the dolly under the center of gravity. I'd be in the water and moving about 10 minutes after leaving my desk including a 2 mile drive to the marina for a lunch time row.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    May 2010
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    Chicago
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    567

    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    I gather that this Rangeley is stripped rather than lapped. IMHO the benefits of the classic Rangeley are that they were stable enough to allow some inexperienced client from Boston to stand while fly fishing, and still not kill the guide while rowing miles with trolling flies on Rangeley lake. The ones I have seen had an incredible amount of flare above the waterline in the bow and stern which also made it unlikely they would submarine in the squalls that happen on that lake. If this is what you want, find a good Rangeley design like a Barrett. As with all designs, you modify at your peril. Re: history, actually the very earliest ones had a thin wineglass transom, then they became double-ended and then they went to a heavier transom with the arrival of outboard motors.

  13. #13
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    Jul 2015
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    Frenchman's Cove, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada
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    Default Re: Rangeley questions

    There is a similar stripper boat, the "Ontario Whitehall' by Bear Mountain Boats that is one foot longer and 10 lbs heavier, this may also fit the bill for you. https://www.bearmountainboats.ca/col...ario-whitehall

    They also have a double ender, the "Stoney Lake Double ender, which is also 16' and a bit narrower. They list it at 60-70 lbs weight. https://www.bearmountainboats.ca/col...ke-rowing-boat

    They sell kits and plans. Somewhere on their website they rank all their boats on stability, including the canoes.

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