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Thread: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

  1. #1
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    Default Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    I would like to do it on my Handy Cat mast. Has to be a kit or something, right?

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    mik storer built this 16' fenwick williams cat with a hinged mast
    details here: https://www.storerboatplans.com/desi...n-strip-plank/



    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    It seems to me that Bolger drew a number of hinged masts.
    My old Pennant sloop had a stainless box heel, hinged on the cabin top and pinned in place.

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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    That mechanism is called a 'tabernackle' and is not uncommon at all. Lots of small boat designers thru the years have employed them for various reasons. Ease of trailering. Getting out from a mooring behind a low bridge. Cruising where one might encounter other unforeseen low bottlenecks. Ease of rigging. Etc.
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    A tabernacle is the normal British solution, good were there are lots of bridges.

    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    I believe Marshall Marine sells their tabernacle hinge as a part. Maybe it can be adapted to your mast. ( No connection, etc.)

    http://www.marshallcat.com/html/tabernacle_mast1.html

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    The bottom end is sometimes weighted and protrudes past the pivot and pivots down into a enclosed slot in the foredeck as the mast is raised.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    I believe Marshall Marine sells their tabernacle hinge as a part. Maybe it can be adapted to your mast. ( No connection, etc.)

    http://www.marshallcat.com/html/tabernacle_mast1.html

    Kevin
    I shamelessly copied this design with a few differences (to fit a given mast) Marshall will not sell the part separately, they insist on installing it in thier mast, but they will make the mast longer or shorter and locate the hinge where you want it, within reason.
    They work great, and if you set it up right you can leave the sail bent onto the hoops and the boom. Ready to sail in about 5 minutes, the toughest part of the operation is removing the sailcover.

    edit;


  9. #9
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Tabernacles are great. Had one on my gaff rigged sloop.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Marianita has a tabernacle. Many of the old canoe yawls had them
    Steve

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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    I seem to recall an article on the parent magazine a while back on hinging masts and tabernacles but I can't lay my finger on it right now. Anybody have the searchable files?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    We have the Marshall Cat style hinge on 14' cat and we love it.
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
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  13. #13
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    My problem is that I can't put the mast up by myself. The foot sticks down into a square slot a couple of feet (it's a wooden mast) and I can't quite lift it and slide it into the slot without someone footing it for me. Seems like there's a way to cut the mast, hinge it, and just walk it up easily. I saw something on the Cat Boat Association forum about a place that's done this to a couple of Handy Cat rigs, but it's got to be something I can do myself?

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    This?


    Copy this, either in oak or metal. Three pieces, two cheeks and a shorter filler at the back.

    You may have to fit a boom gooseneck to the back of the tabernackle below the hinge bolt.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  15. #15
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Obviously nothing new about tabernacles. I never really thought about this though,...... I would be concerned about a cat boat ( or other rig) that has no backstay, or does this force you into running backstays? .... Just curious.

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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by nedL View Post
    Obviously nothing new about tabernacles. I never really thought about this though,...... I would be concerned about a cat boat ( or other rig) that has no backstay, or does this force you into running backstays? .... Just curious.
    Two bolts, one to pivot on, one to secure the heel, that and no gaps should do it.
    Norfolk wherries do not even use the second securing bolt (but do counterweight the mast with lead). The only standing rigging is the forestay, although they did rig shrouds if going outside the river mouth to prevent pitching in a swell from jumping the pivot pin off of the top of the tabernacle.

    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  17. #17
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Two bolts, one to pivot on, one to secure the heel, that and no gaps should do it.
    Norfolk wherries do not even use the second securing bolt (but do counterweight the mast with lead). The only standing rigging is the forestay, although they did rig shrouds if going outside the river mouth to prevent pitching in a swell from jumping the pivot pin off of the top of the tabernacle.

    Now that's an interesting variation. So the pivot pin was not captured, and neither was the heel - with a second pin? Why? Were the spars stored separately, and they wanted them to be quick to step? Or??
    David G
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    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Now that's an interesting variation. So the pivot pin was not captured, and neither was the heel - with a second pin? Why? Were the spars stored separately, and they wanted them to be quick to step? Or??
    That is a lot of lead at the bottom of the mast. Too heavy to stow separately at 3 tonne mast and lead. Gravity held it all in place.


    The tabernacle knees formed the head ledge of the hatch way, so there was no access for a second bolt.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Wherries are something of an oddity in the greater boating spectrum.The rivers they operated on were normally less than three boat lengths wide and punctuated by bridges.The wherrymen made use of the weight of the boat and it's momentum to shoot the bridges with minimum delay.The single halyard sail had no boom and the very sturdy mast could be lowered and raised very quickly so that the sail could be re-hoisted and the boat on it's way immediately.The weight needs to be finely judged and the pivot location and mast heel should be sufficiently accurately located that the pivot sin't carrying the load of the mast while sailing.I have seen bent pivot pins on smaller boats than wherries,where they hadn't got it quite right.Some of the examples earlier in this thread look a bit less well braced athwartships than I would be happy with and it might be nice to have a tapered tenon on the mast heel to guide it into a central position and lock it there.If the counter weighted mast extends below deck level,location is a bit less of a problem on the other hand you do need to be sure water can't get in.I have only ever seen one mast that had a sealed and drained pocket below deck and the .owner had designed it that way.I have known one boat sink because the hatch that covered the slot in the deck wasn't properly secured and got swept overboard.A simple catch would have saved the boat and it is still on the seabed as far as I know.Tabernacles are great when done right,they are a bit more complicated than they might appear though.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by bamamick View Post
    My problem is that I can't put the mast up by myself.... I can't quite lift it and slide it into the slot without someone footing it for me.
    That's one thing I considered an issue in a catboat when we downsized. I had looked into the Marshall Marine hinge and assumed I'd be able to by one individually. It's interesting to hear they won't sell/install it on any but their own masts.

    Mickey- How about installing 'guides' below decks from the partner to the step that centers the mast heel's tenon as you drop it in?
    "It's a pirate's life for me. Savvy??"

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Another option would be to do something on the deck to hold the foot while I walk it up? I used to put Star masts up all the time. You just had to get the foot in the hole to start with.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?



    Something along the lines of the Scamp?
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    WoodenBoat issue #237 has one method for doing this...

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    My Grey Seal had a tabernacle , and quite a heavy Oregon mast.
    Which I noticed had been broken and repaired at some time.
    It transpired that the PO , and a big mate of his were lowering the mast.
    The PO was lowering the mast , holding on to the forestay , and his big mate was going to help hold it for the last bit.
    The PO got to about 45deg , and suddenly realised he couldn't hold it.
    Lucky his mate had quick reflexes , and got out of the road when the PO yelled.
    The mast smashed in to the gallows , and was broken.
    Better than someones head though.
    I always used the trailer winch to lower the mast , on the trailer.
    Rob J.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post


    Something along the lines of the Scamp?
    That's a good idea. Exactly what I was thinking of.

    Mickey Lake
    'A disciple of the Norse god of aesthetically pleasing boats, Johan Anker'

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    My method for raising Marianita's mast might have a few ideas for you. I put one end of a block and fall out at the end of my bowsprit (a trailer tongue would work too) with the other lashed to the forestay just above the turnbuckle.. The working end of the tackle runs back to a cockpit winch. Then I shoulder the mast as high as I can get it (40 degrees maybe?) before putting a custom-built crutch under it to get a bit higher, the crutch then gets tied between the railings so it can't fall over. After that I simply pull the mast up using the purchase power of my b&f while the mast pivots on the main pin in the tabernacle. Using the winch means I can stop at any point on the way up to clear snagged rigging or whatever.

    I think you could do something similar with a slot in your Handy Cat.
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
    R.D Culler

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?


  28. #28
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Some good tabernacle ideas in Chapelle's Boatbuilding​.
    I will beg you for advice, your reply will be concise, and I will listen very nicely and then go out and do exactly what I want! (Apologies to Lerner and Lowe.)

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Here's another way to hinge the mast... once: http://www.sailingvideoaward.com/201...r-nothing.html
    "It's a pirate's life for me. Savvy??"

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    I shamelessly copied this design with a few differences (to fit a given mast) Marshall will not sell the part separately, they insist on installing it in thier mast, but they will make the mast longer or shorter and locate the hinge where you want it, within reason.
    They work great, and if you set it up right you can leave the sail bent onto the hoops and the boom. Ready to sail in about 5 minutes, the toughest part of the operation is removing the sailcover.


    So I think I see a slot which allows/requires the mast to slide once in the vertical position to allow the ball+socket to seat..

    Removal assumes a very light mast as you need to lift it to allow the pivot to kick in?

    Once seated, are we depending on the halyard to keep the mast down in the pocket should sudden and severe heeling occur? (or are these a couple stays/shrouds involved?)

    Thanks

  31. #31

    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    I hinged the mast on a landyacht I made + sailed on a Suffolk airfield in 1976
    Boat Designer. Boatbuilder

  32. #32
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Is there an upper limit (size of boat, weight of mast, etc.) to installing a tabernacle? I was just grumbling recently about the expense of launching/hauling, and a good chunk of the cost involves the crane, labor, etc. for stepping and unstepping the mast. This is an interesting idea. My boat is 24 LOD, 11 beam, about a 25 foot (solid, heavy) mast ...
    Last edited by Bark; 03-09-2018 at 03:49 PM.

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Anyone ever hinged their mast?

    Quote Originally Posted by Bark View Post
    Is there an upper limit (size of boat, weight of mast, etc.) to installing a tabernacle? I was just grumbling recently about the expense of launching/hauling, and a good chunk of the cost involves the crane, labor, etc. This is an interesting idea. My boat is 24 LOD, 11 beam, about a 25 foot (solid, heavy) mast ...
    The practical limit is what you can raise.

    A. By hand - no mechanical multiplication of effort

    B. By use of a line with block or winch to multiply effort, or A-frame to the same effect.

    In my experience, while B is possible/doable... A is much preferable and handier.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

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