Results 1 to 23 of 23

Thread: Shed floor upgrade

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,048

    Default Shed floor upgrade

    I've got a junk shed. It came with the property. It's a basic little 24'x24' deal. Cheap siding, recycled tin roof. I've often thought of pulling it down. But a friend pointed out that the construction is half-way decent. 16 inch centers on the studs. Proper framing. And while the cheap ply sides are rotten, they have curled away thereby protecting the floor plates from rot. The air flow has kept it somewhat dry. About 20% of the structure needs replacing to save it. Plus the siding. But I may go with welded wire and leave it open.

    I describe it in such detail to lay the foundation for my question. I'd like to patch it up and use it for a place to get out of the sun to do some boat fixin. I will not try to make it nice just a shady spot.

    The 4" slab is cracked in 4 pieces. Into 4 rough squares. No steel. A 2-3 inch crack where it has separated. They all slope nicely outwards (the clay under it heaved).

    I plan to replace the floor plates with pressure treated.

    What would be a good material to cover the floor with the goal of covering the cracks, some leveling, and most importantly making it better to spend time on? 2-3 inches. Sand seems hard. Pea gravel? Cypress mulch? Get a chipper and feed it ash juniper and mesquite- would that invite termites? Road base? Plain dirt?

    Any good cheap thoughts?

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Norco Ca. Riverside County
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Are the walls sitting flat on the slab or are they on raised concrete stem walls. You could ledger and joist a wood floor from the bottom of the walls pretty easy. Lots of ways to skin this cat depending on how much material and work you feel like putting in.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    88,884

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    no 2 to 3 inch gravel or sand or dirt floor is gonna sit well atop the concrete
    bust it up and get it out if the way and put packed crushed limestone down
    cheap and easy to put down, easy on your feet and knees and back
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,150

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Gotta go with Paul on that. Pea gravel is nasty to walk on as it never compacts into a stable base. Even road dirt would be better than pea gravel, but the crushed rock will drain better when it does​ get wet.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,048

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Taking it out is gonna be tough. With the poles stuck in dirt and the plates on top. And I'm old. And I don't want to work that hard.

    Went to costco today. Looks line I can cover the 625 sq ft in 1.5 inches of shredded tire for$600 usd. Tempting.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Norco Ca. Riverside County
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Go to home depot and rent a rotohammer and find someone in the parking lot looking for work. If you leave it there you will hate it.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,347

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedog225 View Post
    Taking it out is gonna be tough. With the poles stuck in dirt and the plates on top. And I'm old. And I don't want to work that hard.

    Went to costco today. Looks line I can cover the 625 sq ft in 1.5 inches of shredded tire for$600 usd. Tempting.
    What will that smell like on a hot Texas day?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    88,884

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Spreading a few inches of anything loose over a concrete floor is a recipe for slipping and busting your ass.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,347

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    $600....What would 1.5" of concrete and rewire cost? At 24 x 24 by 1.5" that would be 2.77 cubic yards. Not a fancy job, but perfect enough perhaps, especially with a drainage ditch around the outside and gutters to help prevent any more heaving of the clay.

    Then rubber mats or just 3/4" CDX ply or even OSB just shot down on top of that.

    A few photos would make it easier to help Tom.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    517

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    I bought 3/4" rubber horse mats (smooth or coin texture) that are 4x6 for $20 or so each. Those on top of road base would be pretty comfy. If you put down thin rubber strips about 6" wide and glue them, they should stay pretty gap-free for the duration. If you want wood underfoot, there's a tongue and groove 3/4" (or better) subfloor product called Advantech that is outside waterproof for years (although it's an indoor product). Heavy, resin-impregnated but not slick. Either way, a vapor barrier beneath would be a good idea, even out your way.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,048

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Ok. Thanks everyone. I'm just fiddling with this in my head since the bake the brains days are coming. I'll snap a photo tomorrow and see if I can figure out how to post. I don't love this shed and don't want to start (chuckle).

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,347

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    You've got a winner here. ^ Road mulch and horse mats, just right, and the mats will even have resale value if you ever tear down the structure. I doubt that you'll find anything else that's adequate for the price.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    On the river, Auckland, New Zealand
    Posts
    4,562

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedog225 View Post
    Ok. Thanks everyone. I'm just fiddling with this in my head since the bake the brains days are coming. I'll snap a photo tomorrow and see if I can figure out how to post. I don't love this shed and don't want to start (chuckle).
    bituminous chip mix, I dont know what its called in your part of the world but its the stuff used for carparks, not a lot different to the road surfacing blacktop, the former being laid cold and the latter hot. You smooth it down with a rake then go over it with a "plate compactor" which you can hire from your local hire place. It makes a pretty good shop floor and can be patched if the clay and stuff underneath moves again.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    5,347

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Posting photos is easy now.

    Take the pic and upload it to your computer.

    Click on the square "insert image" icon at the top of the reply box.

    Select "From Computer".

    Now click on "Select Files".

    That will give you a box where you can find your photos that are on your computer.

    Click on the photo you want to post. The name of the photo will appear in the box.

    Click on "Upload File(s)" and wait until it is uploaded.

    Click on "Post Quick Reply". The photo won't actually show full size until you post the reply.

    Save these instructions for further use. Once you've done it a few of times it becomes intuitive.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Up to camp
    Posts
    7,934

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    I am surprised that no one has mentioned a wood floor, so I will.

    Pressure treated 2x sleepers for joists, scribed or shimmed, to address the heaved slab, and plywood or Advantek atop that. Easy, simple, relatively inexpensive, and far superior to everything sugessted above, IMNSHO.
    Steve Martinsen

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,048

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Posting photos is easy now.

    Take the pic and upload it to your computer.

    Click on the square "insert image" icon at the top of the reply box.

    Select "From Computer".

    Now click on "Select Files".

    That will give you a box where you can find your photos that are on your computer.

    Click on the photo you want to post. The name of the photo will appear in the box.

    Click on "Upload File(s)" and wait until it is uploaded.

    Click on "Post Quick Reply". The photo won't actually show full size until you post the reply.

    Save these instructions for further use. Once you've done it a few of times it becomes intuitive.
    Oh....that is easier. I have been away for a while and missed it. Thanks!

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Lake Champlain, Vermont
    Posts
    2,650

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Heaved slab will continue to move. Must be removed.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    PNW, an island west of Seattle
    Posts
    1,699

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    If those slab sections are still co-planer I'd simply fill the cracks with some crushed rock and throw down floor mats. If they aren't, then I'd build a floating wood floor using pressure treated wood and ply. You can cut access hatches into the floor just large enough to get a lever and shim down to re-level the floor in the event of future heaving. Keep it simple.

    Jeff

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    2,162

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    I bought 3/4" rubber horse mats (smooth or coin texture) that are 4x6 for $20 or so each. Those on top of road base would be pretty comfy. If you put down thin rubber strips about 6" wide and glue them, they should stay pretty gap-free for the duration.
    3/4" - 4x6 stall mats run $40+ around here. I've installed them for floors in a little shed and barn. The better installation is over 1/4" minus crushed gravel, leveled and vibrator-plate compacted. The other is just over dirt (I was in a hurry and on the cheap). They're holding up well after several years of use but I plan to redo the dirt floor with compacted 1/4" minus. The mats I used are straight edged (not interlocking) and do expand/contract with temperature changes - more than I expected. I wonder if Chip's suggestion for gluing them to strips would allow them to expand and contract as a unit with gaps only around the perimeter of the floor rather than around each mat? They do smell pretty strong initially but that fades after a few days. And in this application, being animal barns, other odors soon pervade.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    15,286

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Seriously, knock it down and start again.

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    2,048

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Seriously, knock it down and start again.

    Yes. Just too busy at the moment. And it fits into the character of the neighborhood. Maybe i can get a historic designation? Thanks everyone.

  22. #22
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Central Ohio
    Posts
    517

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    Depending on locale, Knocking it down could also start the whole permit/approval process, lead to the inevitable scope creep, and possibly neighbor resistance if codes/zoning have changed since initial construction. Just conjecture of course, but if it's grandfathered in now, repair is better/cheaper/faster.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Norco Ca. Riverside County
    Posts
    240

    Default Re: Shed floor upgrade

    I agree 100%
    Quote Originally Posted by Chip Chester View Post
    Depending on locale, Knocking it down could also start the whole permit/approval process, lead to the inevitable scope creep, and possibly neighbor resistance if codes/zoning have changed since initial construction. Just conjecture of course, but if it's grandfathered in now, repair is better/cheaper/faster.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •