Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 36 to 50 of 50

Thread: Bandsaw Bite

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    1,001

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    And....let the tool spin up, especially older saws. Give machine a chance to get the blade spinning. Youll get a cleaner, safer cut.

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,280

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Sounds like you were early in the process, too. My usual (and recent) "Dumbass" experiences are late in the day when I'm trying to "just finish up this bit before tomorrow so I can start with a new setup"...Healing nicely now, though.
    IMG_3956.jpg

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    1,001

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Ouch

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,150

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Is this a contest?

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Brewer, Maine
    Posts
    63

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    I have an elegant old Oliver 88D table saw and I do everything I can to avoid using it, hoping that I die before having a truly dumbass accident. I have switched as much ripping and cross cutting that doesn't require extreme accuracy to my band saw, hoping (notwithstanding the experience of the OP), that I have lessened my risks. I also take pleasure in using my handsaws and the opportunity not to have to put on ear protection. It really takes alot of concentration not to get hurt.

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Bellingham, Wa
    Posts
    175

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    File this one under dumbass...(snip). Probably should have gotten a couple of stitches but opted for the traditional paper towel and black electrical tape.
    Healing pretty nicely so far if not a little tender.
    Lesson learned....maybe even qualifies as "Double Dumbass".
    I didn't read anything but the OP, that said here's my seriously unsolicited advise.

    DON'T USE ELECTRICAL/DUCT TAPE! OK, sorry, had to get that out of my system. Please get a real dressing on there and keep it clean and dry. Something like gauze and paper of cloth tape. Dressing that don't breath is almost always a bad idea. Leads to maceration/superation... or the transition of your finger to flesh soup.
    Last edited by McKee; 02-27-2018 at 11:06 PM.
    The cure for everything is saltwater - sweat, tears, or the sea.

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,091

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Worst woodworking injury I've given myself was on a bandsaw. Not the saws fault.

    Late in the evening, at the end of a long production run, cutting stacks of baltic birch for shaker box lids. Tired. Saw blade WAY dull. And me pushing hard, leaning into that last cut. Blade veered out, and I fell into the teeth. Pushed the side of my left pinkie in, right at the base of the nail-bed.

    If I'd done that with a sharp blade, my finger would be 3/4" shorter now. With a dull blade, and me beginning to yank the finger back... the dull blade hit bone and kicked my finger away. It looks gnarly, and the nail now grows a bit funny. But same story as many injuries we hear of: tired, pushing too hard, working too late, losing concentration, being dumb.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,150

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    "Not the saws fault."

    Every injury is due to the operator. Even when a machine has a catastrophic failure the root cause is always humans making bad decisions.I investigated workers comp injuries and liability claims for 15 years in wood production facilities. Everything from fatalities to whole limb amputations, even one, pass through abdominal strike. Every incident causing injuries was attributable to the person's involved with the machinery. Every single one.

  9. #44
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,091

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    "Not the saws fault."

    Every injury is due to the operator. Even when a machine has a catastrophic failure the root cause is always humans making bad decisions.I investigated workers comp injuries and liability claims for 15 years in wood production facilities. Everything from fatalities to whole limb amputations, even one, pass through abdominal strike. Every incident causing injuries was attributable to the person's involved with the machinery. Every single one.
    Ayup. With very few exceptions in my experience. I can count them on one hand for my shop. The brand new bandsaw blade with improperly welded seam that cut loose as it came up to speed. Nicked one of my guys forearm. The newly sharpened 10" blade that had a faulty replacement tooth brazing. It came flying off, missed everyone, but startled the sawyer enough that he flopped down and bruised his coccyx. And so on.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Location
    Norwalk CT
    Posts
    1,001

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    I've actually gotten to the point where I stop working or change what Im working on when I feel at all fatigued. Turn off the machines, maybe do some handiwork, there's always something to do that wont involve danger.
    I've noticed as Im sure you all have that when somebody is describing an accident, mishap, injury that the story tends to revolve around " One last ski run, one more cut, just another try...." that's the one that's gonna get you. Resist the temptation, as hard as it might be.

  11. #46
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    51,091

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Quote Originally Posted by willin woodworks View Post
    I've actually gotten to the point where I stop working or change what Im working on when I feel at all fatigued. Turn off the machines, maybe do some handiwork, there's always something to do that wont involve danger.
    I've noticed as Im sure you all have that when somebody is describing an accident, mishap, injury that the story tends to revolve around " One last ski run, one more cut, just another try...." that's the one that's gonna get you. Resist the temptation, as hard as it might be.
    Indeed. For me, it took some close calls and minor dings to learn where the line is.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    https://www.facebook.com/HarborWoodworks/

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  12. #47
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    PNW, an island west of Seattle
    Posts
    1,806

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Getting older has actually aided my shop safety. I'm now used to taking breaks.

    One of the most used pieces of equipment is my comfortable chair.

    Jeff

  13. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,150

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Quote Originally Posted by David G View Post
    Ayup. With very few exceptions in my experience. I can count them on one hand for my shop. The brand new bandsaw blade with improperly welded seam that cut loose as it came up to speed. Nicked one of my guys forearm. The newly sharpened 10" blade that had a faulty replacement tooth brazing. It came flying off, missed everyone, but startled the sawyer enough that he flopped down and bruised his coccyx. And so on.
    On the occurrences that something fails, after examination it usualy turns out someone else didn't perform their job properly. There are times people are injured by a second party, car accidents being a prime example. A similar situation often occurs with forklifts. Althoughi injuries caused by forklift drivers normally require the person injured to ignore safety protocols and stand behind or next to the lift, subsequently they are run over. One person every day dies from a forklift incident.

  14. #49
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    1,280

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Quote Originally Posted by navydog View Post
    "Not the saws fault."

    Every injury is due to the operator. Even when a machine has a catastrophic failure the root cause is always humans making bad decisions.I investigated workers comp injuries and liability claims for 15 years in wood production facilities. Everything from fatalities to whole limb amputations, even one, pass through abdominal strike. Every incident causing injuries was attributable to the person's involved with the machinery. Every single one.
    True words! I've been working with power tools for many years and have pretty well established protocols for my behavior around them. Fatigue is a terrible thing and I figure I got off VERY lucky with a gentle reminder, but not so gentle as to be easily forgotten or ignored. I do an open workshop once a month for newcomer woodworkers and this should serve nicely as a serious reminder for THEM as well!

  15. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Posts
    1,150

    Default Re: Bandsaw Bite

    Knowingly taking risk to save time or energy is by far the leading cause of injury. People take risk with high potential cost with mere seconds of time as the benefit.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •