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Thread: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

  1. #1
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    Default Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    It's time to freshen up the interior fiberglass old my old sea pearl. I would be happy with an upper end work boat finish and was planning to use rattle can spray paint or roll and tip rustoleum. The almond is pretty close to the original.

    Then I saw the appliance "epoxy" and thought I'd check to see if it would be better or worse. I like the idea that it would be tougher but suspect uv might be an issue.

    As with my recent rope question (and tbanks), I'd like an easy solution. So water over oil if I am going to brush on. Though I will mask up for spray paint if I need to.

    I suspect some will shudder at the thought of latex on a boat exterior. Sorry. Open to other suggestions but trying to avoid a major project.

    Thanks

    Tom

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I used plain old rustoleum on a FG trailer sailor used in fresh water. 5 years on it still looked good & this was on the exterior of the boat. I thinned it some & then rolled & tipped.

    Can't tell you how much longer it went as I sold it.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I used Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint on the interior of my dog's boat. Like most paints labeled "epoxy", it isn't. As I was spraying, the can sputtered and spit out big drops of paint. I was angry but to my delight the droplets did not run/sag and they flowed out invisible. The finish was surprisingly nice. And, it is fairly hard/scratch resistant. One thing fer sure, the finish is really slippery - my dog hated it and clung to the gunnel rendering the craft unmaneuverable.








  4. #4
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Rattle cans are a pain in the butt for covering big areas and probably the most expensive paint per ounce that you can buy. Any way you look at it, a rattle can paint job is going to be a thin and not very durable finish. I'd much rather use a good grade of hardware store polyurethane floor enamel, brushed or rolled and tipped like this Ace Hardware paint...



    ...or Home Depot's Behr Premium Epoxy Concrete and Garage Floor paint, like the stuff used on this one. Both types have good durability and roll and tip well to produce good even film thickness at a reasonably affordable price, and they can custom mix you just about any color you want.


  5. #5
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Great insights and info. I would have made the mistake of putting the spray on the decks. And thanks for the specific product recs. Very helpful. Thanks!

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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    While we are on the subject, what is the current thinking on non skid for the decks? Years ago, I salted the last coat of paint while it was fresh. Worked pretty well and was free. Fine"play sand" also comes to mind.

    Or better to go ahead and buy some product?

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I use the premium play sand (no random pebbles) with good results but the sand color eventually shows through...depends on how often you paint. I had ok results (of 2 yrs live aboard) with very coarse sawdust in resin (over glassed plywood hatches) but only had it a couple yrs and don't know the life span. It absorbed the resin and didn't show any problems. The non skid from Interlux was way too fine and not very grippy.

    One nice thing about Rustoleum rattle can pro paint is they are 99.99% splatter proof with a fine, even spray pattern and can be used at any angle instead of only upright. There is no turning the can upside down to clear the nozzle though. I pull the nozzle off after use and soak in acetone to clear it. I used black Rustoleum "rattle can epoxy" on a firearm yrs ago. I'm impressed but personally wouldn't use it on a boat because I don't know the outdoor exposure factor.

    If the boat is kept under cover with infrequent use just about any paint should be ok. I used porch n decks on old plywood skiffs and had good results but I live in harsh conditions and stopped using them because of lifespan and quality of boats. Marine paint always covered better and lasted longer. After using different paints I personally think its false economy to use anything but marine paint. Interlux single part Brightside easily lasts 10 yrs in full time exposure here in central Florida on a glass boat...rolled and tipped. Dark blue on one of my boats faded at around 5 yrs but it compounded out and buffed to near new. I painted it at around 15 yrs and it sits outside and is used a couple times a month yr round.
    Last edited by BillP; 02-18-2018 at 09:18 AM.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Check out Rustolium Marine Paint.. Only comes in quarts and may be rolled and tipped or sprayed. Have used quite a bit of it for interior and exterior marine coverage.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I've had very good luck with porch and floor enamels, both latex and oil-based.

    But spraying, in my experience, is not all that it's cracked up to be. It's very good for odd-shaped objects, like a chain, but most of the time you're better off to use a brush.

    You don't want smooth on any walking surface on a boat. You want a grip. You can get a number of products which you can shake-on to the fresh wet paint, giving a non-skid surface. It's very easy.

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I should mention that the non-skid on the deck looks much better when you mask around the edges of each section first. Gives it a dressed look -- not just like a crappy paint job.

    I did quite a bit of Drake's deck over the past 2 years. The non-skid is FAR better purchase on a splashy day.

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    I should mention that the non-skid on the deck looks much better when you mask around the edges of each section first. Gives it a dressed look -- not just like a crappy paint job.

    I did quite a bit of Drake's deck over the past 2 years. The non-skid is FAR better purchase on a splashy day.
    Really good point. I do about an inch along the bulwarks/rail, same on the cabin, hatches, cleat pads, & around stanchions. I also divide the deck into about 5' sections with a 1" 'stripe' so I don't have to do everything at once. I'm dealing with big decks though...

    I have used sand for years - but am really tired of what it does to knees (or pants in colder weather). I am gonna try the rubber stuff: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0155K0PZO...a-310957416851

    I saw it at the Maine Boatbuilders Show a couple of years ago & was impressed.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I once embedded sand in cross-linked LPU paint. I took a plastic peanut butter jar, awled holes in the lid to make it a giant salt shaker and filled the jar with mason's sand.

    I sprayed on a layer of LPU and immediately sprinkled some sand on it. Then I immediately covered the sand with more sprayed LPU.

    Worked great.

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I'm cheap as they come but I found a shaker bottle of deck grip, doesn't show through, cost very little, no real reason to mess with sand. I put it under a layer of boat building epoxy like west.

    For paint, the current thinking is aluminum door screen paint. For white I am using Behr supper white latex. I want to try their nano paint, which is no longer sold around here with nano as part of the advertising. It is just their top of the line.

    I sprayed some appliance epoxy on metal projects, the one thing I can say is that quite amazingly it is reusable after one blows the nozzle clear, something I rarely have luck with. But more importantly, I found high heat seemed to make it a lot harder. I assumed it was epoxy and that I was post curing it. But if it isn't I don't know what was happening.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    My brother has a rough skiff he uses to get out to his sail boat .It's some thing he saved from the yard dumpster .It looks pretty good,and can hold 4 people with gear .He painted all the walking surfaces with a paint designed for exterior handy-cap ramps .The nonskid is built in .

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Has anyone figured out a non-skid surface for brightwork? I experimented with additives to varnish and a spray-on non-skid, to no avail.

    This spray-on non-skid was a fail on the test board





    I gave up and went with shower mats - we only walk on very few areas of brightwork and the shower mats worked great due to the limited area where they were needed. Also, the shower mats do not have the cleaning challenges inherit with paint/varnish embedded non-slip.

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    I used to put non skid on varnished decks as follows: mask off area. Apply varnish. Spread non skid powder ( intergrip or equivalent) using a big salt shaker made out of a coffe can. Be generous. Let the varnish dry 90%. Blow or vacuum off the stuff that didn't stick, re coat over the top. Mixing the grip into the paint or varnish always delivers uneven distribution of non skid media.
    Worked well, but was a pain if you wanted to refinish because the grit is something like silica sand and beats us your sandpaper instead of the other way around.
    We did the salt thing for years, but it makes the boat wet before delivery and helps to rust all the stainless. Good news was that you could sand and recoat because it was just rough paint. Wasn't all that durable.
    We finally settled on crushed walnut sandblasting media. It's wood, can be applied as above or mixed into the paint.
    i like PPG Aquapon as a good non glossy paint for interiors. It's two part water diluted, can be brushed or sprayed.
    Kirby sells it. Not cheap, but good stuff.
    SHC

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Mo 'Poxy View Post
    Has anyone figured out a non-skid surface for brightwork? I experimented with additives to varnish and a spray-on non-skid, to no avail.

    This spray-on non-skid was a fail on the test board





    I gave up and went with shower mats - we only walk on very few areas of brightwork and the shower mats worked great due to the limited area where they were needed. Also, the shower mats do not have the cleaning challenges inherit with paint/varnish embedded non-slip.
    A non-skid surface for brightwork?

    Go to your room for a time-out!

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    A non-skid surface for brightwork?

    Go to your room for a time-out!
    I'd love to - may I take a good book with me?

    I have some stairs in my house that are nice big hunks of wood that I varnished with non-skid added. The first coat without non-skid was scary slippery in stocking feet.

    OK - now back to boats.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Easy non-skid recipe:

    Mask out areas with lime green 3M lacquer-proof tape. You don't need non-skid everywhere, just where you walk. Lay it out so it looks good.

    Apply a coat of slow-cure epoxy resin adhesive inside your taped areas where you want the non-skid surface. (You want to have some working time.)

    Pour (don't "sprinkle") whatever grit of clean sand you want over the wet epoxy about a half inch thick. (Not fine grain like table salt, but larger grain like sea salt.) Do not poke at it. The weight of the sand will press the grains into the epoxy evenly. Allow the epoxy to cure.

    Vacuum up the loose sand. Brush or sweep the remaining sanded areas to remove grains of sand that are barely clinging. Vacuum well.

    Paint over the areas. If you lay on a couple of thick coats of enamel, the result will be a "pebbled" effect that won't scrapes knees and feet. Work the paint well into the surface so the paint doesn't puddle between the sand grains too much. Be prepared to be surprised by how much more paint it will require than painting a smooth surface. (True of any rough surface.)

    Voila! Bulletproof non-skid surface that works well and looks great.

  20. #20
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    Default Re: Rustoleum appliance epoxy spray paint

    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Cleek View Post
    Easy non-skid recipe:Apply a coat of slow-cure epoxy resin...Pour (don't "sprinkle") whatever grit of clean sand you want over the wet epoxy...Paint over the areas. .. Bulletproof non-skid surface that works well and looks great.
    I like it...One question...How do you prep the sand-embedded poxy surface prior to painting?

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