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Thread: More Hartley

  1. #631
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Greetings,

    Kind of a big day around here today, the bat handles are in! Not too sure what handholds on a sailboat bulkhead are called. So the bat handles are glued and screwed in!

    Attachment 92207

    At least the supports are anyway... I was planning on using some old DF plugs that I had, but soon realized that I had do better than that!

    Attachment 92208

    So I retrieved bat remnants and cut me some bat plugs! Out of bats! How cool is that?

    Attachment 92209

    Tomorrow I'll trim the bat plugs, sand it back to where it should be and then epoxy/varnish the plug. It may be stupid, but I'm liking them!

    Another item that has been occupying my grey matter is the standing rigging for the non-standard mast. And sails. And the rudder. But not the bat handles!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    Hello Eric,

    The build is looking great!

    We have a few suggestions based on the amount of "Bat Things" you just posted:

    First. . . Your Half Garage Shop should be re-titled. . .
    The Batcave Shop
    The Batcave.jpg

    And you might consider. . .
    The Batboat(?)
    Batboat.png

    Oh well. . . maybe, maybe not.

    Keep 'em coming and continue to reuse, repurpose and reconstruct as much as possible. The results are great!

    Stay safe, stay healthy.

    J.
    "Ships are the nearest thing to dreams that hands have ever made." Robert N. Rose

  2. #632
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    I'm sure have this covered, but when you bed the chain plates. Screw them down firmly, hand tight, and then let the goop go off. Then next day, nip them down tight. You want to make sure you leave gooo all through the join and not squeezed out.

    A Batley 16?
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  3. #633
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    YAHOO! Make sure you seal the raw edges well with 'poxy
    Absolutely Hugh! It wouldn't do to do otherwise. I've also got some DF trim lined up for a "coat 'em all" party later! Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Kapiteinterzee View Post
    And you might consider. . .
    The Batboat(?)


    Oh well. . . maybe, maybe not.

    Keep 'em coming and continue to reuse, repurpose and reconstruct as much as possible. The results are great!


    Thanks for the great name suggestions Joe! I'm digging all of them...

    bat boat.jpg

    ...but may have a bit of a problem with the real deal from '66. Not sure what the statute of limitations is on this. But it does kind of roll off my tongue. Thanks again!

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    I'm sure have this covered, but when you bed the chain plates. Screw them down firmly, hand tight, and then let the goop go off. Then next day, nip them down tight. You want to make sure you leave gooo all through the join and not squeezed out.

    A Batley 16?
    Hey Trev! Never be sure of anything when speaking of things that I need to do. My confident exterior may be housing an empty basement of boat building knowledge.

    But not this time. However since I used up all of the epoxy on the "coat 'em all" party, I dug deeper and found the remnants of the 3M 5200 that I used on the mast step. Directions say the shelf life is like 24 hours after opening, but when I cut off more of the nozzle, I found viable adhesive sealant. That I thought was trash. Expensive trash too!

    DSCF8647.jpg

    So covered the mounting area with some of the most tenacious stuff around.

    DSCF8648.jpg

    Then carefully slipped the chain plate into place. Halfway tightened the bolts.

    DSCF8650.jpg

    Scrapped away the squeeze out and washed the rest of it off with acetone. Definitely need to use the strong stuff to remove 5200! Gloves are a good idea too! Will come back tomorrow to tighten them up. I'm waiting on longer bolts for the forestay chain plate. Hope that 5200 stays in good shape.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric

    PS Hmmmm a Batley 14?
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  4. #634
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    Default Re: More Hartley



    14, of course!

    nice bedding job.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  5. #635
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    Thanks Trev, I even came up with a different way to get at the 5200.

    Progress_01.pptx.jpg

    Not too sure how much more that I'll need to finish the boat, but you know that I'll be trying to mine more out of this tube!

    I must be learning something from you folks out there. I caught myself spending some time thinking about the best way to do things and actually revised my plans and tried it a different way!

    Progress_01_2.jpg

    After cutting and fitting everything as best as I could, I coated the mating surfaces with thickened epoxy, clamped them into place and then went on to the next piece. Following placement of the last piece I began to start driving screw to hold everything together. And just like every time that I have to crawl around in the cuddy, I remember why I wish I went for a bigger Hartley.

    Ah well, despite the heat, I've gotten a bit of the final pieces done or closer to done. I was hoping that last weekend I would have the mast ready to measure up the new shrouds, but that didn't happen. Perfect opportunity because my son and son-in-law were visiting us.

    Progress_01_3.jpg

    Anyway, upcoming tasks include measuring shroud and forestay length and building them. Add trim and silicone to the cockpit. Install flapper valves in transom. Wait, I'm nowhere near getting finished with this boat. I keep on adding this, that and the other to my workload. Why just the other day I caught myself cutting these? Not sure why, but felt it was important enough. Evidently.

    Stars.jpg

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  6. #636
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Hope everyone is doing well and coping with the pandemic. We're back to staying home and making bets about which baseball games will make it to our TV.

    Not much has been going on in terms of boat construction. But I did install, fair and paint a first coat on that companionway trim. This paint takes forever to cure and be ready for the next coat. Expecting a total of 2-3 coats it will probably take about 2 weeks minimum.

    DSCF8688.jpg

    Had some new distractions going on.

    DSCF8686.jpg

    On top of that, these points of light keep showing up. And they're morphing!

    DSCF8689.jpg

    As you may notice, not much was accomplished this week. However it does look like I'll be able to set the mast and measure shrouds and forestay this weekend. Maybe.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  7. #637
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Very cool! Rebuilding the guitar, or making a new one?

  8. #638
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Very cool! Rebuilding the guitar, or making a new one?
    That's a new one Hugh, cheapest strat kit I could find online. Used nitrocellulose lacquer, so now that I've got 7 coats of clear gloss on top of the color, it's time to let the finish cure. Probably won't see this body again till November. But I'll use that time to find good deals on quality pickups, pots, tuners and bridges. The stuff from the kit isn't very good.

    It's because of of this little project and a couple of other distractions that my boat progress is lacking.

    DSC_4142a.jpg

    Civilians in space!

    Hopefully have a chance to take the boat (on the trailer) to a nice flat piece of pavement without overhead utilities later today. To measure the shrouds and forestay, my plan is to have my SIL hold the mast in the correct position and I'll mark the location of the chain plate hole on a cord previously tied on to the appropriate part. Can then measure the cord at a later date and figure out the fittings and length of wire rope to make it work. Any ideas on ways to improve this?

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  9. #639
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Ahhhh...a man after my own heart; "no such thing as too many projects" If you get the mast up for a measure, get us greedy folks some piccies, eh? It's all looking great!

  10. #640
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    Thanks Hugh, as you know, too many projects is just like too many clamps. Just can’t happen!

    So I was able to get the mast up for some shroud and forestay measurements. Usual September Florida day, hot and muggy. Special thanks to my daughter and SIL for helping, especially my beautiful wife came out to pitch in!

    When you are picking up this mast in the middle, it’s just not that heavy. But when you are trying to lift it up and hold it without supports, it’s HEAVY! But we were able to get it up there and then SIL did a great job of holding it up. Even tried to dial in that 6” aft rake. But I’m not too sure of my ability to raise the mast solo. Can I use the boom as a gin pole? Then again, how many times will I need to do that?

    Progress_01_4.jpg

    So while he is holding the mast in place, I’m pulling the mason’s line taught and marking the bearing position. This shot is on the forestay.

    DSCF8703a.jpg

    And this is on one of the shrouds.

    DSCF8704a.jpg

    The job today was to get the mast into as close as final position as possible and then mark pre-installed mason’s lines from the tangs on the mast to the chain plates. Then at a later date, measure the bearing distances and using the fixtures that I’ve got, determine the length of the two shrouds and forestay wire rope. When I was wrapping up the strings after we finished, the shroud marks that I made were right by each other. I’m going to take that as a good omen. Will find out later.

    One negative was that the topside paint that I used on the companionway trim was still sticky! 3 days later!

    More later. Yahoo!

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  11. #641
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Looking great! I know we used to use the boom as a gin pole on Ranger 20s to good effect. A little bit of leverage helps compensate for that long stick On Merit 25s, we used to use the spin pole as a gin pole, laying the mast aft...all kinda depends on how your tabernacle is set up innit.

    You're obviously a guitar guy, so the question is; are you a "pedal" guy? A friend of mine has been building up different effect pedals and is sending me his blog address and I'll forward that on if you want...gee...more projects

  12. #642
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Looking great! I know we used to use the boom as a gin pole on Ranger 20s to good effect. A little bit of leverage helps compensate for that long stick On Merit 25s, we used to use the spin pole as a gin pole, laying the mast aft...all kinda depends on how your tabernacle is set up innit.

    You're obviously a guitar guy, so the question is; are you a "pedal" guy? A friend of mine has been building up different effect pedals and is sending me his blog address and I'll forward that on if you want...gee...more projects
    Yeah, I really think I need to spend serious thought time on the the gin pole question. Getting the mast up today took a lot more energy than anticipated. But it was sure nice to give it a go! I still don't have a boom and really need to figure that one out. But nothing other than grins all around today!!!

    With regard to the guitar, I'm resurrecting skills from ... well a whole bunch of years ago. I know that pedals will be a part of my future so please do send a link!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  13. #643
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Fantastic Eric!
    looking great.

    what I did for a trailer 16ft I had was; attach the side stays while the mast was down. Have a long forestay that can lace through the bow fitting while the mast is down. From inside the boat, simultaneously lift the mast and haul on the forestay. Get the mast up 45 degrees or so, tie off the shroud somewhere handy, jump out and haul up the rest of the way.
    my mast was deck stepped into a small low tabernacle type set up, like yours.

    what are you using for your stays?
    I'd use dyneema. Easier than steel wire, and stronger, but does stretch a little to begin with.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  14. #644
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    what are you using for your stays?
    I'd use dyneema. Easier than steel wire, and stronger, but does stretch a little to begin with.
    Ouch! I've just received a spool of 1/8", SS316 wire rope. I'll just have to see how that goes. Thanks for recommendation though!
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  15. #645
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    With regard to the guitar, I'm resurrecting skills from ... well a whole bunch of years ago. I know that pedals will be a part of my future so please do send a link!
    If you're a pedal guy you might like Mike's blog: https://steggostudios.blogspot.com/ He's been building kits and stuff from scratch since he got back into guitars recently.

  16. #646
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Ouch! I've just received a spool of 1/8", SS316 wire rope. I'll just have to see how that goes. Thanks for recommendation though!
    Typical forum! Always too late.
    You going to swage it yourself?
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  17. #647
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    You going to swage it yourself?
    Well, yes and no Trev. I've decided to try out these swageless fittings.

    stalokinstructions.jpg

    I've installed thimbles before with a big ole crimp squisher, but don't have any experience with swageless fittings.

    We'll see how it goes, should be starting in on them soon.

    Any advice out there?

    More later,

    Thanks
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  18. #648
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Hope that everyone is doing well and their teams are winners this weekend!

    Lately I've been getting some small stuff done on the boat. Figured that I could save up the tasks/photo's and put them together in a sangria. So here we go.

    DSCF8733.jpg

    I finally cut up some white oak (?) salvaged from a pallet that a friend contributed. This will be a cap over the rear 2' of the centerboard trunk. Originally this was going to be painted. All I needed to do was to decide on a dark brown color that could be used elsewhere. But I never got around to it and pushed this task back so far. So it'll be bright for now. 2 coats of epoxy and 3 coats of varnish.

    On the other side of that knot is much bolder version, even has holes! So I'll probably try to finish the other side as the top of the cover by filling in the holes to get a flat surface for several coats of varnish. Not that it was intended, but if I pay attention I'll have a bit of varnish performance competition. The varnished used up until about 3 months ago was a very expensive product that was compatible with the paint and laid down super flat! But when I ran out of that, I decided that some big box stuff that I'd used on non-boat projects would work just fine. Florida sun be a big challenge for both products, we'll see.

    Another bit of annoyance was sealing up the centerboard pivot bolt. So I did some measuring and started cutting and fitting.

    DSCF8749.jpg

    The idea is to laminate these DF boards to get a rough draft of two sealer's.

    DSCF8750.jpg

    After lamination I can shape as desired and finish it out. Will probably try to figure out how to get a gasket of sorts involved. When I start thinking about a gasket groove and other nonsense, I start getting off course of my KISS principle. So I'll probably overthink the whole question and end up just bedding it with something appropriate and screw it down. We'll see.

    More soon.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  19. #649
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Good sangria's take a bit of time.

    I was able to talk our son into helping me measuring the forestay and shrouds. Earlier I used mason's line to get an approximation of how long each of those were, bearing to bearing. Then I cut the cables (1/8" 1-19 SS316). After remeasuring everything I could! I was a bit concerned about the impact of a short cut, but finally made the cuts.

    Then I needed to add eye terminations to all three of the lines.

    DSCF8735.jpg

    These swage less terminations are fairly easy to install. Then I hung them from the pins on the mast, wrapped the shrouds around the mast and waited for our son to get here.

    DSCF8736.jpg

    Back to the big parking lot.

    DSCF8760a.jpg

    It was a bit windy.

    DSCF8754.jpg

    But I did get the measurements that I needed. It wasn't till later that day that I realized I could have clamped the shrouds to the chainplates and made other measurements that would help insure that the mast ends up in the right place. Doh! Maybe next time?

    I'm learning so much it hurts sometimes!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    Last edited by FishoutaFlorida; 10-03-2021 at 01:37 PM.
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  20. #650
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Sangria tastes better the longer it mixes and the more flavors are added.

    All of these bits and pieces are all different sizes and shapes of tasks. One that is a bit bigger are the windows. I cut these several weeks ago and have been waiting to solve the centerboard pivot bolt sealing and the centerboard halyard issues. Basically, I want to finish all of the cuddy stuff before I put the windows on. It's hot enough as it is without windows, don't want to imagine what it's like with windows. Anyone have any ideas about venting this puppy?

    Anyway, I got the precut panels out and started to get them ready for installation. From another blog, I got some ideas on how to get away from using bolts to install the windows. Here is the link for your viewing pleasure.

    https://www.thecoastalpassage.com/windows.html

    Windows_01.jpg

    The adhesives used for this install are 3M brand tape VHB 4991 and Dow Corning brand, silicone # 791. There is a lot of detail for the materials and the install on the blog shown above.

    Windows_02.jpg

    Now I'm ready to paint the inside overlap. This is done with a high-temp black spray paint to ensure that the adhesives will not be visible. They may not have been visible without the adhesive since I have black tinted acrylic material, but the paint is cheap and I don't want to take a chance about something like this.

    DSCF8744.jpg

    And now it's painted. Something like 3 coats.

    DSCF8746.jpg

    OK, now i need to finish and install the centerboard pivot bolt sealers and set up the anchor for the centerboard lanyard. That may be the first piece of running rig that I will install! Maybe, maybe not. We'll see.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  21. #651
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Looking really good! I like the idea of painting the adhesive surface to avoid seeing the adhesive. When I replaced the windows on my old Merit 25 I used dark plexi, but you could still see a faint outline of the adhesive once installed. I used butyl tape and through screwed the plexi through the cabin sides. Make sure your mounting holes ae sufficiently oversized (if that's what you're doing) to allow expansion as the acrylic will move at a very different rate from the wood.

  22. #652
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Hey Hugh,

    Well, no holes at all in the window mounting. Just 3M brand tape VHB 4991 and Dow Corning brand, silicone # 791.

    But I haven't got there yet. Still doing little prep-projects like this.

    DSCF8778.jpg

    Remember the centerboard pivot bolt sealers? I decided it was about time to get on with them, since I wanted to finish all of the cuddy stuff before installing the windows. Anyway, I found a bicycle inner tube with a hole in it and started to cut up some rubber gaskets.

    DSCF8780.jpg

    I cut them a bit oversized, then super glued them to the sealers and came back to cut out the inner circle.

    DSCF8782.jpg

    Then cut out the screw holes. Box cutter wasn't working so well so I went with the X-acto blade. I removed the cuddy sole and somehow managed to get the sealers installed. But I was a bit light on the pilot holes a couple of time and lost a screw or two to dead end pilot holes. So it took an extra bit of time to get those screws out, extend the pilot holes and get the screws anchored all of the way.

    DSCF8784.jpg

    Kind of a tough photo to get, but it's in there. Hope I don't have to look at it again for quite a while! The only other thing I need to install before the windows is the running gear for the centerboard. I've got the fittings, the line, just need to get the right sized bolt to anchor the rigging to the eyebolt. Should be able to get to the windows fairly soon then.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  23. #653
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    October in the mlb world…sweet! This time of year gets very interesting for baseball fans. NL west and AL east especially. Hope your team is doing well! I'm not getting much sleep because of late games.

    Today I was able to cob together the centerboard halyard and install the centerboard case cap. All is done in the cubby now, I think. Time to install the windows. Or whatever they should be called. Taking the previously cut acrylic windows, I started to get them ready for install.

    Windows_03a.jpg

    My process plan was to mask the window outline and cover other areas like the deck that might get a bit dirty. The adhesive portion of this method is the use of 3M Tape 4991. It’s 1” wide and about 1/8” thick. Evidently this stuff is used in the automotive industry to hold pieces of cars together. The word on the street is that if it touches something, it stays there. This proved to be true because when I went to slide the window right after placing it on the boat it was super tight, didn’t budge at all. Then outside the adhesive, close to the edge of the window, I used Dow Corning Silicone #971. Street talk says that this is a good adhesive as well as a sealer and that the adhesive tape may be a waste. Once I put the 1” tape down with about ¼” space from the real edge of the window I realized that the 1 ½” offset I used may be a problem. Not much space for the sealant. So I packed it in for the starboard window.

    Windows_03b.jpg

    With good adhesive/sealer, the idea of fastening the edge of the acrylic with temporary screws went out the window. Plan A was now to tape the end edges. Not sure that was necessary because once the pressed the window on, I couldn’t move it anywhere. The port window seems to be in the right spot, but I’ll take a look at doing a better job with the masking to ensure that the window gets in the right spot. Finally it was a nice day to work outside.

    Windows_03c.jpg

    With regard to doing a better job on the masking, I put the bottom masking on first. Then set the acrylic on the upper edge of that masking tape and traced the rest of it. Cut on the tracing and went on with getting the adhesive and sealant on the acrylic.

    Windows_03d.jpg

    With more sealant around the edges I got more squeeze out which I scrapped off. All in all, I was feeling good about this installation. Will let you know how I felt the next day.

    More soon,

    Thanks!

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  24. #654
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    It was a nice sunny morning to push the boat outside for the reveal.

    DSCF8804.jpg

    DSCF8805.jpg

    Then I removed the masking and started removing edge dribble of the sealant. Very easy to trim off and remove from the varnish. Then I removed the protective paper.

    DSCF8808.jpg

    DSCF8809.jpg

    And I don't like it. That bottom of the acrylic line just looks like $%^&. The shapes and orientation of the shapes just don't work. I like the color but...I set these up by measuring from the edge of the cut opening to the edge of the acrylic. Checked them 3 times. Taped them up in their location (still with brown protection paper) and felt confident in everything. Up until I pulled that paper off.

    And those adhesives aren't letting go. How ironic. This is where it's really difficult to highlight errors to benefit other so they don't repeat my error. I'm not even sure I know exactly where I went wrong. Not looking at the window in place without ​the brown protective paper I guess.

    I'll just figure out some way of adding trim to improve the look. Sure, that's been working for me on this boat. Sometimes.

    And then on to my latest idea about the boom. Could be interesting.

    Rat farts.

    More later,

    Thanks!

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  25. #655
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    I take they can't be peeled off now?
    be modest, and be proud of it.

  26. #656
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    I take they can't be peeled off now?
    I may have to do just that. Tomorrow I'll try my lower trim idea to see if that has any weight. I'm concerned that the adhesive will tear off the okoume face...
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  27. #657
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    An idea that might help is set a powersaw to the thickness of the window. With the bottom edge of the saws baseplate held on the sidedeck you could get an edge parallel with the side deck.
    be modest, and be proud of it.

  28. #658
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    An idea that might help is set a powersaw to the thickness of the window. With the bottom edge of the saws baseplate held on the sidedeck you could get an edge parallel with the side deck.
    You know Gary, the more I think about it, the more I like the idea. Or a similar version. The one big unknown is how is that 3M tape going to come off with out too much collateral damage? After spouting all of this info about how tough it is, can I remove the cut off portion without destroying the ply? And if it did, is it that bad?

    Questions, questions, questions. So to find out how tough it would be to remove acrylic from varnished ply, I created a test setup. I used a cut off of the same ply but it wasn't varnished. Time constraints steered me away from concerns about that difference.

    Windows_04a.jpg

    On one piece I used both the 3M tape and the silicone, on the other just the silicone. Wanted to see how strong the silicone is by itself. For what its worth, when I pressed the samples onto the ply the silicone only would allow movement, not so with the tape specimen. I'll try to tear it apart tomorrow after 24 hours.

    While I like the possibility of the cut and remove option, I'm also keeping my trim over option going. So I cut a bunch of okoume ply strips for the trim. My thought is that since the tape is 1/8" and the acrylic is also 1/8" I could cut a backer strip to make up that thickness and provide a level surface for the cover strip.

    Windows_04b.jpg

    So I traced a template for these backer strips and traced them onto the strip. My goal is to fabricate the backer and cover strips for the trim over option and get them more or less finished so they will be in final colors (varnish). That way, when I do a temporary installation I should get a good visual representative of what that option will look like. I added a photo of the Hartley book. Good book for a wide range of Hartley's designs, but not so great with specific details. Not that I expected it too.

    Windows_04c.jpg

    So I figure that if I can pry the test sample off without too much damage, that's what I'll do. If I do some serious destruction, then I'll keep working on the trim over option. Simple, right?

    I still have this boom idea that's rattling around my head and it really should be interesting. Maybe get onto that next week.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  29. #659
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    Apr 2015
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    St. Helens, Oregon
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Good luck, Eric!

  30. #660
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    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Thanks Hugh, seems like I always need that!

    So after 24 hours of testing the 3M tape and silicone are in. I made up a test rig with one specimen just using the silicone and the other with both the tape and silicone.

    Boom_02.jpg

    #1 shows the test board.

    #2 I grabbed the pointy end of the silicone only specimen and tried to pull it up away from the ply. The acrylic bent and snapped a little over 1/2 way through. Where the width of the specimen and silicone was wider. I couldn't pull up the remainder, but got a putty knife and was able to remove it relatively easily. Note that the silicone was strong enough to make the ply break and the mess the putty removal left.

    #3 shows where I cut the specimen only and pulled off the bottom. Not much tape in the removed piece, mostly silicone. But the ply where the tape was is clean as is the bottom of the tape that got pulled up.

    #4 shows the removed piece after using the putty knife on it.

    Results of this highly specialized and precise test show me that the only problem with the cut and remove option is the junk it leaves behind. The silicone doesn't want to come off the wood. Maybe I'll cut, remove and cover the dirty stuff with ply?

    So on with the boom...

    Boom_01.jpg

    Remembering that I'm using an aluminum pole, I originally thought that I would build a wood boom per the design and use it when I upgrade the aluminum mast to a wood one. Lots of problems finding CVG wood down here, couldn't even get pieces of #1 timber. So I went to the nearest box store and got the best that I could find. Brought it home to rip it and build that puppy!

    Right up until the time my 30 year old table saw shot smoke and sparks out while tripping the breaker. DOA. Put it out on the curb and it was quickly picked up. But what about my boom?

    So #5 shows two masts, a good mast on the left for a Hobie 14 and a bent mast on the right for a Hobie 16. Hmmmm.

    #6 shows the results of some trimming that I did. You may have guessed that I'm going to splice these two together to get what I need. Plans show the boom for the Hartley 14 TS to be 9'-4", but when I measure that I see that the boom swings a bit too close to the outside corners of the deck. Why is that a problem? I'm planning on putting some fishing pole holders in the corners and troll while sailing. So I decided to go with 8'-3" and chopped off a straight portion of the bent mast to fill that role.

    #7 shows the wood I was ripping when my table saw packed it in.

    #8 I'll use a 3' length of the right side of the ripped board to splice these two pieces. The splice will be on the end of the boom away from the mast.

    DSCF8831.jpg

    I traced the inside edge of the boom section and used pins to mark up the wood.

    DSCF8832.jpg

    With the ends marked up, I drew limit lines for my carving. Nice to get this stuff done today, feel better than I did last night. Of course the Red Sox add to my distress last night too.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  31. #661
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Hope all are well and your team is winning! I hadn't posted in a while so I thought that I'd just bring folks up to date and get off the 3rd page.

    My time has been spent completely rearranging the garage/workshop. Having some electrical work done and was reminded by the contractor that there needed to be a minimum 3' clear space around the circuit breaker box. So out comes the table that was cleated directly to the wall beneath the breaker box. Down with the shelves and I had to wheel all of the rest of my stuff to a different location. Except I didn't have a different location to move too.

    I was storing all of the lumber and ply under the boat in my 1/2 of the garage.

    IMG_5776.jpg

    Kind of sloppy, but it worked. Until I had to move everything around. Did a bit of research and came to the opinion that I needed a material caddy, on wheels!

    DSCF8844a.jpg

    Cat's meow right there. There is even room for more lumber! Now I didn't design this myself. I actually paid $9 for a fairly detailed assembly manual with plans. Now I have a shop where the boat was and the boat is where my wife's car was. Temporary setup till I can get it finished and in the water.

    DSCF8840a.jpg

    Kind of hard to tell in this photo, but I do have a shop area larger than before. Yahoo! Now on to:

    1. Finishing the boom
    2. Finishing the standing rigging
    3. Start the running rigging
    4. Trim the cockpit
    5. Establish the waterline
    6. Paint the below waterline portion of the hull with combination hard/ablative paint that folks around here seem to use a bit (Petit Vivid)
    7. Paint the above waterline portion of the hull (Lots of hangar rash to take care of)
    8. ????????

    As they say, the last 10% of construction takes 90% or the total time. More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  32. #662
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    342

    Default Re: More Hartley

    lumber cart looks great! I am so happy I have put most of my tools on wheels. Wish I did it years ago. I think a lumber cart is next. Thanks for posting

  33. #663
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    Hope that you and yours are well, safe and warm.


    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    lumber cart looks great! I am so happy I have put most of my tools on wheels. Wish I did it years ago. I think a lumber cart is next. Thanks for posting

    Thanks gray duck! Like you I've got just about everything is on wheels, why I waited for a lumber cart is beyond me. The cart designer recommended 4 wheels with each having a capacity of 250 lbs, otherwise use 6 wheels. So I went with 4-4" wheels with swivels, brakes and a 250 lb capacity. Super glad that I did that because this puppy glides around like its on an ice rink! 6 wheels might have gotten in the way with each other .

    OK, back to boat construction.

    DSCF8846.jpg

    I finished up with the cockpit trim and caulking. Looks good, but it's real value is in covering up my mistakes. It seems that I've been learning things as construction progresses. Had I learned them earlier, I probably wouldn't need this trim.

    My next task was to build a wood boom out of ordinary store bought lumber. But that got derailed by the demise of my table saw while ripping a SPF 2X4. Weird noises, sparks shooting all over, circuit breakers popping and finally a bunch of smoke with a lot of quiet told me the saw was done for. Now I don't really have any money laying around for a new table saw, and even if I did, I wouldn't know which saw would work the best with my upgraded garage shop. But the other day the obvious answer came to me, go with a metal boom! I had two metal booms hanging around. One from a Hobie Cat 14 that wasn't long enough for the Hartley and the other was from a Hobie Cat 16 which has long enough. Except that a truck had backed over the boom and turned it into scrap metal. BUT, there was a 4' section that was undamaged and the Hobie 16' boom cross section has the same cross section as the Hobie 14. So...

    DSCF8851.jpg

    ...I grabbed the wood that messed up the table saw and shaped it to be a splice block for the new boom!. Now the plans call for a 9'-3" long boom. The boom would extend just beyond the transom. Which would really mess up my plans for putting a couple of fishing pole holders in the transom and trolling while sailing. Hey now, like the song says "I've got nowhere to go and all day to get there"! I decided that a 8'-3" boom would work just fine.

    So I cut up the bent boom and put the three pieces together.

    DSCF8853.jpg

    But my boom cut wasn't as square as I thought it was. So I brought out a file and went to work on it.

    DSCF8854.jpg

    Covered the splice block with epoxy, bolted it together, riveted all of the accessories back on and called it a boom. Even installed the gooseneck on it.

    DSCF8856.jpg

    Now onto the next challenge, yahoo!!!!!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  34. #664
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Location
    Canberra, Australia
    Posts
    165

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Not sure if you’ve already solved the portlight issue, but could you perhaps make up a wide frame to go on the outside which covers the edge of the acrylic and ‘resets’ the lines of the portlight to be parallel to the deck? It will slightly reduce the size of the window but might be a lot less painful than trying to remove it.
    Sailing - the fine art of getting wet and becoming ill while slowly going nowhere at great expense.

    - Henry Beard

  35. #665
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    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    824

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Brightwater View Post
    Not sure if you’ve already solved the portlight issue, but could you perhaps make up a wide frame to go on the outside which covers the edge of the acrylic and ‘resets’ the lines of the portlight to be parallel to the deck? It will slightly reduce the size of the window but might be a lot less painful than trying to remove it.
    Great current question Tom. Exterior framing was my original thought and I worked up a solution for the port side. Then life items just kind of changed priorities for a bit. I had plans to finish up the standing rigging this weekend, but mother nature may not let that happen. So all of a sudden I need to do at least 2 other tasks while waiting for calm breezes. One of them is finishing the portlights. I'm still leaning towards the framing option. I think that me making that acrylic cut is a bit iffy. And the other is...

    Laying out the waterline on the hull.

    When I started this build back in the Lone Star State, I had no idea that I would end up living on a brackish water canal. Quite the opposite, that's one of the reason's that I chose the Hartley Trailer Sailer. So I could sail wherever I was, or a couple more miles down the road. Anyway, with all of this in mind I painted the hull in a oil based marine paint from SoCal. All of our moves lately and general garage use has also put it's mark on the hull. Now the intent is to put the boat in the water and leave it there. So I need a bottom paint.

    The question is, can I use Hartley's drawings to estimate the location of the waterline or do I need to put the boat in the water and somehow mark the waterline?

    Waterline Plan.jpg

    I certainly any input on this matter. And thanks in advance for tossing your 2 cents in!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

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