Page 4 of 4 FirstFirst ... 34
Results 106 to 112 of 112

Thread: More Hartley

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toodyay, Western Australia
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: More Hartley

    In my current build there is some exterior grade which I purchased maybe 15 or so years ago, and some recently purchased imported 'marine' ply. The old exterior is better than the 'marine' ply. I don't think 'marine' means anything these days. Whatever you use, make sure it is well sealed, preferably glassed too. Provided it can not get wet it should be pretty safe.

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Rat Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    214

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Small boats rock View Post
    In my current build there is some exterior grade which I purchased maybe 15 or so years ago, and some recently purchased imported 'marine' ply. The old exterior is better than the 'marine' ply. I don't think 'marine' means anything these days. Whatever you use, make sure it is well sealed, preferably glassed too. Provided it can not get wet it should be pretty safe.
    Thanks for your thoughts Geoff. Having spent $75 for an unremarkable pine marine/exterior sheet of 1/4" AA 4X8 ply at my "go to" megastore I found a similar size at a blue box store that was an exterior Douglas Fir and BC for $27. I had planned to search near and far for BS 1088 products. But after this I think I will stay with the DF exterior and save some dollars for the rest of the boat. And plan on sealing everything.

    Fins up!

    Eric
    Please don't dominate the rap Jack, if you've got nothing new to say.

    Robert Hunter

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Rat Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    214

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Another weekend gone by, another step to completion.

    Finally onto the centerboard case construction. Sealing all and installing fiberglass on the inside of the case...cleats and spacers, yahoo! Here is the first coat of epoxy prior to glassing.

    DSCF7113.jpg

    Anchoring the glass while trimming. By the way, this is a 6 oz fabric.

    DSCF7118.jpg

    Determined to use up small fabric pieces on this, you can see the overlap here after the first epoxy over glass coat.


    DSCF7128.jpg

    Being graced with a SHWBO that allows this kind of nonsense to go on through 38 years of garage projects, I'm definitely able to provide a slip for her ride.

    DSCF7129.jpg

    I just had a 3-day weekend, highlighted with a Red Sox victory over the Halos. But I also got some work done and took some photo's.

    Breaking into this portion of construction I'm trying to pickup the speed by assembling everything and then moving on.

    I think I'm going to spend a lot of time sanding sooner or later.

    More soon,

    Eric
    Last edited by FishoutaFlorida; 04-24-2018 at 01:53 AM.
    Please don't dominate the rap Jack, if you've got nothing new to say.

    Robert Hunter

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Rat Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    214

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings again,

    OK, sealing coat prior to glass. Here are the two sides, one sanded, one original.

    DSCF7133.jpg

    Both sides with second coat over the glass.

    DSCF7134.jpg

    Final surface treatment. 1 coat epoxy, 1 layer 6 oz glass, 2 layers epoxy

    DSCF7136.jpg

    Next task, cut the spacers and glue/screw the two sides together.

    More in a bit.

    Eric
    Last edited by FishoutaFlorida; 04-24-2018 at 02:01 AM.
    Please don't dominate the rap Jack, if you've got nothing new to say.

    Robert Hunter

  5. #110
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    Rat Beach, CA, USA
    Posts
    214

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings,

    I was a bit concerned that some of the cleat attachment screws were not adequately recessed. But with the epoxy/glass it seems to be flush with everything else.

    DSCF7140.jpg

    Interesting problem here in connecting the two sides together. When I laid one side on the other with spacer in between and epoxy on both sides of the spacer, greased lightning!

    DSCF7162.jpg

    Nice break.

    DSCF7152.jpg

    So now I have a centerboard case. Next task, sand it down and install it!

    I certainly appreciate any and all observations/comments/redlines on this adventure. Please continue!

    More next week,

    Eric
    Please don't dominate the rap Jack, if you've got nothing new to say.

    Robert Hunter

  6. #111
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Uki, NSW, Australia
    Posts
    25,098

    Default Re: More Hartley

    When gluing two pieces together and there is a risk of them sliding what I do is nail in some thin wire nails into the glue face and cut them very short. So just a tiny bit is proud, this locks into the other face and it will never move.
    Very nice mirror finish on the glassing by the way.
    The definition of stupid has got to be the belief that more guns will negate the bloodshed done with guns.

  7. #112
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toodyay, Western Australia
    Posts
    251

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Similar to Gary, I usually use screws or nails temporarily to prevent slipping, but get them out when the epoxy is partially cured (they are sometimes impossible to remove when fully cured). Later the holes get filled with some thickened epoxy. Of course this method is only good for work which is to be painted later.

    I see your use of weights... I have lots of those which have been very useful on my current build (although not the fancy Olympic type as yours appear to be). However, I have noticed that even if I load say 200kg of weights, old batteries, etc onto a glue job, this gives hardly any pressure compared to clamps... so I use clamps where a bit more pressure is needed.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •