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Thread: More Hartley

  1. #666
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Set the boat up level and use a laser level. The waterline should just kiss the base of the transom.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  2. #667
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    I live in the South too and my advice is to carry your antifouling paint a little higher than the water line. Around here the growth and grunge is pretty significant. And with tidal flow in and out and wave action there is a lot of chit that splashes up and clings to your boat 24/7. One foolproof way to know where YOUR actual boat's waterline is to put it in the water for 3-4 days and nature will show you exactly where the WL is. You can mark a point on the stem and stern, wash and sand, laser line between points and paint.

    I know it's an extra step but I think it guarantees to get it right and it saves clean up and maintenance in the future.

    By the way, it is awesome to have a boat in the water, ready to go. Just haul it out every so often to scrape and pressure wash the growth off - or scrub more frequently in the water.

  3. #668
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Did you decide to let it live on a mooring?

    If its on a trailer you don't need antifoul. You can paint the whole hull one colour.

    If you're keen, you should get it close enough from the plans.

    The minute you stow a bag in the cabin, sling a motor on the back, have a guest on board and all that, splashing along in a chop, running down wind or beating to weather, the waterline goes the way it wants to.
    Which waterline are you aiming for
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  4. #669
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    Set the boat up level and use a laser level. The waterline should just kiss the base of the transom.
    Thanks Gary, that location confirms what I was thinking about. Now I need to figure out the best way to set it up for painting. I see lots of folks taking the boat off the trailer. I've been thinking about painting the hull on the trailer, then lift and block up the hull along the keelson to paint the bunk spots. The paint I'm going to use doesn't have a requirement for immediate immersion. Think that will work?

    Quote Originally Posted by gray duck View Post
    I live in the South too and my advice is to carry your antifouling paint a little higher than the water line. Around here the growth and grunge is pretty significant. And with tidal flow in and out and wave action there is a lot of chit that splashes up and clings to your boat 24/7. One foolproof way to know where YOUR actual boat's waterline is to put it in the water for 3-4 days and nature will show you exactly where the WL is. You can mark a point on the stem and stern, wash and sand, laser line between points and paint.

    I know it's an extra step but I think it guarantees to get it right and it saves clean up and maintenance in the future.

    By the way, it is awesome to have a boat in the water, ready to go. Just haul it out every so often to scrape and pressure wash the growth off - or scrub more frequently in the water.
    Lots of good advice there gray duck, I appreciate the comments from folks who have gone down this path before. With regard to setting the waterline, I'll have to see how things work out. It would work into my schedule better if I could finish the standing gear and hull painting and get her in the water as soon as possible. So I may go the plans, stand back and make a somewhat educated guess where the waterline will be on the stem and the transom and then use a level to mark up the rest of it. But things change in a hurry around here so these plans may as well.

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Did you decide to let it live on a mooring?

    If its on a trailer you don't need antifoul. You can paint the whole hull one colour.

    If you're keen, you should get it close enough from the plans.

    The minute you stow a bag in the cabin, sling a motor on the back, have a guest on board and all that, splashing along in a chop, running down wind or beating to weather, the waterline goes the way it wants to.
    Which waterline are you aiming for
    Yup, in a canal dock with brackish water. In the back yard.

    Funny, when I started this project years ago I was living in Texas with a couple of decent sailing lakes within 1 or 2 hours of driving. Which was a large factor of choosing a Hartley Trailer Sailer as my vessel. So I painted the whole hull one color/one material thinking it would have a nice long life on the trailer. Now here I am, back in FL with water access. And a boat on a trailer. So it's either in the canal or at a storage place on the trailer. go figure.

    So as mentioned above, Plan A is use all the references I can find and paint it. By the way, the paint I'm using is supposedly a combination of a hard and antifouling materials. Made this decision by talking to everyone that I could find locally who could speak from experience.

    And as to which waterline am I shooting for? The best one I can find!!! Although with the way things have gone with this boat, maybe I could put waves on the waterline? Hmmm...

    With regards to boat progress, I haven't been building much, but I've been making decisions about which way to go. Probably the biggest one is sails. Remembering that my mast is not as designed.

    IMG_6248.jpg

    I'm using a 20' aluminum mast (Section C-6?) from an unknown sailboat and a 9' boom scrapped together from a couple of Hobie Cat 14 booms. So I put together a sail plan kind of based on the design and using dimensions that I developed for the luff, foot, leech and head for a main sail and a jib. Then I got on the phone with a sail kit company and have started in on a custom design process. Very informative speaking with a sail maker, certainly made me feel better about some of the things my layout did as well and sending me back to other items that I now knew what to do. Still working out the details, but will probably order them by the end of the day.

    Yahoo!!!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  5. #670
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    I hope that your holiday season is going well and that you have a great New Year!

    So I got back to the boat earlier this week as our holiday starts to wind down. The motivation to do so was a bit different though. With the boat back in the garage and all of the wood stock and other pieces of equipment, there is only a very narrow hall to get to the side yard door. On the day after Christmas I must have impaled myself of the transom corner 3 or 4 times taking out the trash. So...

    Progress_20211228a.jpg

    I marked out an appropriate radius, grabbed my shinto rasp and removed the problem. OK.

    On a slightly more important scale, I finally figured out how to deal with the poor alignment of the acrylic windows. I had entertained covering up the ugly portion with wood or removing the offending piece and clean up the adhesive and sealant. But I had one of those moments where from out of nowhere a better idea hits me.

    What if the cuddy wall by the window, looked like the window instead of the wall? It could work. Maybe.

    DSCF8881.jpg

    So I used up a bunch of tape, found some gloss black paint and put my creative side of my brain to work.

    DSCF8885.jpg

    Well, its better than before and now I can forget about that goof. Well almost.

    Even though I had done a good job of masking right around the windows and such, I failed to consider the wind. I was painting outside, with light coats and spraying from 8" to 10". I probably put 7 coats of gloss down and thought all was well. Until I tore the masking tape off and found some overspray. More on the windward side, but still some around all of the edges.

    Progress_20211228b.jpg

    Now the overspray on the deck isn't too bad because I was planning on putting another coat of topcoat/non-skid paint down anyway. But now I'll be cleaning/sanding a lot of the coaming and re-varnishing it where previously I had checked that task off and thrown it in the trash bin. Oh well, It's not like it's ready to sail. (Update, sail kits came today ).

    So, a note to self and others who might find themselves in a similar situation, go ahead and mask it out like you think it should be, then double or triple the coverage before you spray anything!

    Moving onto the rudder next.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  6. #671
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Brilliant! The ol' "if ya can't fix it, feature it" concept.

  7. #672
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Thanks Hugh! It's amazing how the simplest solutions are so hard to come by.

    So I've been working on assembling the rudder. I've built the three major components and purchased the parts and materials and up until a couple of days ago, all of them have been laying around collecting dust. Pero no mas!

    Progress_20211230a.jpg

    Started with the upper body of the rudder, located the pintles and modified the upper body to fit the pintle bracket. Dimensions didn't exactly follow the design, but close enough.

    Progress_20211230b.jpg

    Then I located, drilled and installed the upper gudgeon. Since the pintles were already set, I hung the main body of the rudder from the upper gudgeon to locate the lower one. It turned out that even though my distance between the pintles on the rudder was less than design, the lower pintle ended up below the cabin sole in the bilge. Instead of bolts to anchor this gudgeon I used screws.

    The sail kit also got delivered! That will be a challenge!

    DSCF8910a.jpg

    Rudder is hung and swinging freely.

    DSCF8911a.jpg

    Now I need to attach the lower body of the rudder and fabricate a connection between the tiller and the rudder.

    Hope that everyone has a safe and Happy New Year!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  8. #673
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    The plans are a bit in-decisive regarding attaching the tiller to the rudder, probably just as well cuz I would modify it anyway. Using a patch of 16 ga 316 SS that I could afford, I started out modifying before I even started.

    I started out with a rectangular section of the tiller where it connects to the rudder.

    DSCF8912.jpg

    But I didn't have a break to make a crisp bend at those upper corners I decided to reshape the tiller.

    DSCF8914.jpg

    And wrapped that steel around the tiller to get the shape right.

    DSCF8916.jpg

    Drilled some holes, stuck bolts in them and that task is done!

    DSCF8918.jpg

    Well not really, I need to protect the insides of the holes, redo the finish and paint the lower portion of the rudder with the hull paint that I haven't got yet. In time.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  9. #674
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Nice! Very solid! I've always had a swing-up tiller and always liked them, but have sailed some boats with fixed tillers like that and I think I like 'em now

  10. #675
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Nice! Very solid! I've always had a swing-up tiller and always liked them, but have sailed some boats with fixed tillers like that and I think I like 'em now
    Thanks Hugh, you know I seem to like the idea of a swing-up, maybe with a pin to fix it when you wanted...

    But since I've got next to no experience with either, I'll have to find out on the water .

    Thanks again!
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  11. #676
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    I think it depends a lot on the shape of the cockpit (and to a certain extent the occupants) what works best. I've never sailed a Hartley so I really can't say how that cockpit works. I've always raced, so switching side to side was always critical. Depending on how much space I had between me & the boom dictated stepping over the tiller or ducking under it

  12. #677
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Fish, my only observation is that the rudder cheeks are too low on the stern.
    What you should avoid is having them drag through the water. I would raise the lower pintle and the cheeks and build a longer rudder blade.
    Only the rudder blade should be dragging at the stern.
    I have seen many different designs of rudder in NZ Hartley 16 fleet...... Hartley did not specify a definite rudder design and the Class introduced a box rule.
    SO 16s have rudders of all shapes. Build the holding bracket light on the basis that weight out of the ends of the boat is best.
    As the hull is beamy when hard on the wind a lot of the rudder is out of the water. So start with a long blade - you can always make it shorter if you are not happy with it.
    Make sure you fit a tiller extension as you will require your weight on the gunwale and forward to extract best sailing performance especially in a strong breeze.
    Last edited by Don MacLeod; 01-06-2022 at 03:33 AM.

  13. #678
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Don MacLeod View Post
    Fish, my only observation is that the rudder cheeks are too low on the stern.
    What you should avoid is having them drag through the water. I would raise the lower pintle and the cheeks and build a longer rudder blade.
    Only the rudder blade should be dragging at the stern.
    I have seen many different designs of rudder in NZ Hartley 16 fleet...... Hartley did not specify a definite rudder design and the Class introduced a box rule.
    SO 16s have rudders of all shapes. Build the holding bracket light on the basis that weight out of the ends of the boat is best.
    As the hull is beamy when hard on the wind a lot of the rudder is out of the water. So start with a long blade - you can always make it shorter if you are not happy with it.
    Make sure you fit a tiller extension as you will require your weight on the gunwale and forward to extract best sailing performance especially in a strong breeze.
    Thanks Don! I certainly appreciate your observations! Especially the reminder about the tiller extension. It's on my list of things to do, but I haven't done it yet. So my list must have gone through the wash last week.

    Your comment about the height of the cheeks on the stern is particularly interesting. The rudder pieces conform to the plans, but I modified the location of the lower pintle/gudgeon by raising it up a bit. Not that many Hartley's around here so experienced opinions are a valuable asset. I'll hang the rudder again and see just how low those cheeks are. Then figure modifications if needed. I might just shave a bit off the top of the top rudder piece to raise the bottom of the cheek to the bottom of the transom and move pintles and/or gudgeons to suit. Thanks again!
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  14. #679
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    Just to pick up from my last post, I dove into the observation that Don had made earlier. Here is what I found.

    DSCF8919a.jpg

    I took this photo to try and get a true elevation view. Assuming that my garage shelves in the background are "flat", it doesn't look like the cheeks are hanging too low. The prior photo that got me thinking about it (thanks Don) seemed to show that the cheeks were hanging lower than this photo does. I'd like to keep the existing setup primarily because I'm lazy. And inexperienced. So I'm leaning toward putting this on the get around to it list and see how it works until then. Thoughts?

    Next up, sails! So I have taken the DIY path with a sail kit, a main and jib designed for my specific mast/boom/forestay layout. With regards to sewing I really have limited experience sewing at all and none with Dacron. But after searching the used market for sails and combined with new sail costs, my goal of limiting expenditures took over and I made the kit order.

    SailProgress.jpg

    As soon as I started to spread stuff out in the living room, I knew that things would change. First look at the kit, very complete, the Dacron was nothing like canvas at all and everything was labeled!. The 4.4 oz Dacron is very light and stiff. It turns out that when you finish the corner patches the combined stiffness is really strong.

    As you can see from the photo's above, my conceptions of a viable workspace didn't take into consideration anything about use of interior spaces or my flexibility and agility. Before this I was sure that the floor would be my workspace. I was sure that the insulation boards that ended up as table tops would cushion me. Bringing the workspace up to a table level was the only way I was going to accomplish this. I'm sure that this setup will continue morphing even further as I progress.

    With regard to the sails, I've decided to build the jib to completion and then the main sail. Get my feet wet on the smaller sail? So I started at the foot and worked up the sail. Connected a totals of 9 panels I think. Technique was to first baste a seam between panels, sew the seam and then repeat the process moving up the sail.

    DSCF8930.jpg

    Kit instructions are very good, require attention and thought, but give you all of the required info. Recommendations in the instructions suggested breaking the sewing order to create several groups of panels, then sewing the groups together. As flexible as this material is, I just kept adding the next panel up, rolled it up and basted and sewed the next panel until I reached the head.

    DSCF8931.jpg

    One thing that I noticed in assembly was the accuracy of the the panel cuts and markings. Everything fit.

    Right now I've sewn the all of the jib panels and corner patches together. Because I'm using a standard sewing machine with a maximum 3/16" zig zag stich I need to have 2 runs on each seam as opposed to industry specific machines that can accomplish the task with a single row. So now I need to sew two parallel lines on straight line seams and around curved patch edges...it's not a pretty sight. At all. What I've sewn so far looks terrible, but maybe skills should improve with practice? I'm glad it's a white thread.

    Input from those who've been down this trail before is always appreciated. Especially regarding sewing machine needle and bobbin thread tension when sewing Dacron.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  15. #680
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Boy I've really jumped into the sail making tasks these days. Battling the sewing machine, rearranging the tables and spending the majority of my time fixing most of my error's. But every once in awhile I pay attention.

    Like this.

    leech line.jpg

    I started on the jib thinking that the small sail was where I should start. Maybe I should have spent more time practicing! Oh well.

    DSCF8932.jpg

    I think I might have settled in on a table/singer layout. But in reading through The Sailmaker's Apprentice I have found some other ideas that I'll try. On the mainsail. Maybe.

    At any rate I kept at it, mostly hand sewing after a bunch of machine seams. And I got this!

    DSCF8947.jpg

    I still need to sew the eye on. And as you can see, I've got a weird bunch of stitches going on here. But I'm getting better! By the time I start in on the main sail I hope to make a lot better looking seams!

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  16. #681
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Nice! Did the kit come with the grommet set for the eye? Sailrite seems to do a great job, but I've never really looked at the "contents" on one of their kits.

  17. #682
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Fascinating Eric - I've never done this.
    Looks like your nailing it, well done.
    Great to watch.
    It's all fun and games until Darth Vader comes.

  18. #683
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Nice! Did the kit come with the grommet set for the eye? Sailrite seems to do a great job, but I've never really looked at the "contents" on one of their kits.
    Yes it did Hugh, so far seems to be a very complete kit. Sailrite has been very quick at answering my questions as well. Hope to be done with the jib in a couple of days.
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  19. #684
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsie View Post
    Fascinating Eric - I've never done this.
    Looks like your nailing it, well done.
    Great to watch.
    Thanks Trev, I really appreciate your kind words.

    This is another challenge that will take me some time to get acceptable results. I'm glad you can't see more of my stitching details. I've just finished up an afternoon of taking out seams that even I can't take. Right now I've punched in the luff grommets and still need to sew them in. Finish the clew and then on to the big show!

    On top of that, we've been having all sorts of distractions down here lately.

    DSC_4350a.jpg

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  20. #685
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Regarding work space. I found that 2 tables in an L shape worked quite well.
    DSCN1838.jpg
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  21. #686
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by WX View Post
    Regarding work space. I found that 2 tables in an L shape worked quite well.
    DSCN1838.jpg
    Thanks Gary, that's a lot of sail stacked up on those tables. I like how everything is off the floor. That seems to be my problem, keeping stuff off the floor.

    I'm trying to apply the KISS principle to get the most from the least in this project. Anything that helps in production techniques can make a big difference. Sailmaker's Apprentice showed a set of tables on a slope, trying to ease the effort to get the sail to go in the expected direction. I'm pretty sure that I don't want to do that. But I do need to work on improving processes and skills.

    Currently I've finished up all of the sewing machine work on the jib and now need to hit the details. Hand sewing in the grommets and seams where the machine just couldn't do the job (limit seems to be 7 layers). So I've broken down the current setup and put my wife's car back in the garage while I do the hand work. Will later try to figure out how to handle the mainsail sewing facilities.

    With regard to improvements, my main problems have been keeping the sail on the narrow flat space that I've got. When the sail starts to slide off one way or the other, I've got to stop, get up and get over to the location and rearrange and try to anchor the sail on the table. If I'm not on top of it, the seam starts to take off for parts unknown. Since the main sail is taller and wider, I really think that I need to do better with the production facilities before I start that part. Like keeping it from falling off of the sewing surface. In this case, I'm thinking that bigger surface is better. Or maybe I just work at rolling up the excess sail better. More clamps? Better clamps to hold the roll? Or not paying attention to huge loft facilities in advertisements?

    DSCF8946.jpg

    Feel free to toss in any comments. I definitely appreciate any and all thoughts, observations, comments, hints, etc.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  22. #687
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Just an update, I'm still trying to finish the boat. I certainly do appreciate any and all input or observations.

    So I'm starting in on the mainsail. Tried to improve the table facilities.

    DSCF8957.jpg

    1/8" to 1/2" ply below the insulation board.

    Also decided to try extending work hours a bit later than previously done.

    DSCF8958.jpg

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  23. #688
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Hi Eric:
    Sorry, I'm maybe too late with this, but as a recovering sailmaker I have gone through most of this, and more...
    Doing neat seaming is an art, and it hinges a lot on set up and ease of movement of the sail over the machine and table.
    We used plywood "troughs" set up on horses (saw, not saddle), and made an effort not to run the machines fast until we had a groove, and could track well.
    Troughs were ply, 18"' wide and sides about 6". Go slow. focus, and give yourself some indexing guidance to see where the sewing machine foot wants to be while doing each row. It takes time, both to zero in on the skill and also just to get the job done, setting a time expectation will hurt you as you will push, just let the task take its required time.
    Brian

  24. #689
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Boatsbgood View Post
    Hi Eric:
    Sorry, I'm maybe too late with this, but as a recovering sailmaker I have gone through most of this, and more...
    Doing neat seaming is an art, and it hinges a lot on set up and ease of movement of the sail over the machine and table.
    We used plywood "troughs" set up on horses (saw, not saddle), and made an effort not to run the machines fast until we had a groove, and could track well.
    Troughs were ply, 18"' wide and sides about 6". Go slow. focus, and give yourself some indexing guidance to see where the sewing machine foot wants to be while doing each row. It takes time, both to zero in on the skill and also just to get the job done, setting a time expectation will hurt you as you will push, just let the task take its required time.
    Brian
    Never too late in my book Brian! Last night I began to realize how important the bold portion of your comment is. I never really had a time expectation for this portion of the project, but I realized that I was acting/sewing like I did. Thanks for the good idea!

    I'd like to see a little more about the troughs you used. I'm assuming that they were troughs for the sewing machine. But are they set up to have the sewing platform on the machine match the table elevation? 6" sides would put the sewing surface about 3" below the table. Obviously I'm missing something, but I sure would like to try it. It seems like my problems with sewing a straight seam are from the rest of the sail not sliding across the table smoothly. If an end of the material catches on something, all of a sudden my stitch is heading across the panel that I'm sewing.

    DSCF8960.jpg

    Any thoughts on how to improve this set up? I've just started the main sail and could stand to make some improvements!

    More later.

    Thanks!!!

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  25. #690
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by FishoutaFlorida View Post
    Never too late in my book Brian! Last night I began to realize how important the bold portion of your comment is. I never really had a time expectation for this portion of the project, but I realized that I was acting/sewing like I did. Thanks for the good idea!

    I'd like to see a little more about the troughs you used. I'm assuming that they were troughs for the sewing machine. But are they set up to have the sewing platform on the machine match the table elevation? 6" sides would put the sewing surface about 3" below the table. Obviously I'm missing something, but I sure would like to try it. It seems like my problems with sewing a straight seam are from the rest of the sail not sliding across the table smoothly. If an end of the material catches on something, all of a sudden my stitch is heading across the panel that I'm sewing.

    DSCF8960.jpg

    Any thoughts on how to improve this set up? I've just started the main sail and could stand to make some improvements!

    More later.

    Thanks!!!

    Eric
    Set your table up in an L shape. I notice your machine is sans the bottom case. I would recess the machine into your bench so the machine table is level with the bench.
    I would rather have questions that can't be answered than answers that can't be questioned


  26. #691
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Hope everyone is doing well, including the Rams!

    I'm still working on the sails and probably will be for awhile. Photo's of the outcome are kind of tough with white thread and white sailcloth. Nothing really stands out. It sort of always looks the same, more or less. Regardless of if you're sewing sail panels or batten pockets, it's still just all one color. Every once in awhile I run across something unique.

    Definitely stupid, but unique. I'm thinking about adding/changing my signature below to include a warning about doing the things that I'm doing. Sort of like Vice Grip Garage on YouTube.

    Anyway the sail kit has important locations and positions marked on the sailcloth (4.4 oz Dacron) but since the location lines are very fine and not very visible. So they would add a small, white sticker with the name of the location. Like seam location, reef location, batten location and that kind of stuff. Which really made things easier to figure out. Also helpful if you choose to put all of the patches and such on the same side of the sail because these stickers where all on the port side of the sail. Like the location markers were. So I chose to put everything on the port side since you could easily find no matter how you had folded the sail.

    On the mainsail, I'd finished all of the patches and primary reef points (5 layers each), batten pockets ( 1 layer each) ,and intermediate reef points (2 layers each) and was inspecting the sail for loose threads when I noticed something.

    DSCF8963a.jpg

    In the upper right corner, you can see where I forgot to move a sticker and placed a patch over it.

    DSCF8964a.jpg

    Yeah. Either I get used to seeing this encapsulated bit of information or I tear apart the basted leech and get it out of there. Since the leech line and protective tape is my next task I'll need to figure out which way to go very soon. But I think I'll take a break today and enjoy the Super Bowl.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  27. #692
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    Still working on the mainsail, probably 3 to 4 hours a day, 5 days a week. But I'm making some progress.

    Today progress was sewing the luff boltrope sleeve and installing the boltrope.

    DSCF8967a.jpg

    This sleeve took 3 zig zag stitch lines (about 54') and I basted all of them. Instructions call for basting the first stitch , but I had some problems on the leech that I thought basting with this double sided tape would help. It did.

    Before enclosing the sleeve, I installed some strong string to pull the boltrope through the sleeve. I finally decided to use my wife's car as a reaction point.

    DSCF8965a.jpg

    Tied off the pull string to the trunk latch and pulled the sail. Worked fairly well but I had a couple of places where I got just a bit too close to the sleeve pocket. Because of the tape that I wrapped the rope in at the head the pull would jam up requiring me to persuade the passage. Once the head of the rope got past the tight point, no problem.

    One thing that I did learn today was that these kit instructions include a method of accounting for the rope stretching. And the instructions included the calculations for this particular sail. Once the sail is in the sleeve in the right spot you anchor the rope to the sleeve on the tack end of the luff. Then make sure that all of the rope is evenly distributed in the sleeve and nothing is pinching the rope and go to the head end of the boltrope and mark the top of the head's location on the rope at rest. Then pull the additional rope calculated out of the sleeve. For the luff, my distance was 1 3/4".

    DSCF8970a.jpg

    Basically you hand stitch with a waxed thread through the rope and sleeve, then around the sleeve to the next point through the rope and sleeve. Kit provides #16 hand needle. You can also see the printing on the foam board and the results of rubbing the thread stitches on it. I imagine it will probably wash/fade away, but right now it's kind of irritating. Breathe in, breath out, move on.

    As I wrote this piece, I've also come up with another question. I know that ropes used on sailboats are halyards, sheets, etc. and even if just laying around it's called a line. But this portion of the sail is called a boltrope. Should I be calling it a boltrope or line instead of rope? I wasn't consistent above and now I'm not sure. Inquiring minds want to know so if you can cast some light on this question please do.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  28. #693
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all,

    It looks like I'm coming into the last lap of sail making. This has taken a bit of time and the story/photo opportunities are limited. But I've still got a bit more to show.

    Like leather protection at the head of the jib sail. Also did this at the tack and cleat, but once again, it all looks the same.

    Progress_20211230c.jpg

    Even though I think that my sail sewing skills are improving, I've got a very long way to go. Especially the backside of the jib, which was the first sail I worked on. Super ugly, will probably demand some attention in the future. But it got better as I honed skills and sewing machine adjustments.

    DSCF8978.jpg

    Now the head of the mainsail was a bit different. A 2 piece headboard with aluminum rivets. Spent time drilling small holes for the rivets. Drill just frayed the edges of a hole and I needed to pay attention to location and the size of the hole. Ended up getting two holes drilled/riveted to hold the location, then drilled the rest of the holes and got the rivets installed. Turn it over and peened each of the rivets, cut the big hole and install the grommet. Yahoo!

    DSCF8975a.jpg

    Jib (just pretend you didn't see the dried remnants of some type of prehistoric automotive or garden fluid )

    DSCF8977a.jpg

    Mainsail

    Sails are done! Well kind of. I may add some tell tales to the main. OK, I see another nautical grammar question out there. Tell tales or tell tails?

    Next tasks are to register the trailer and boat. Figure out how to get back into the boat from the water. Finish the standing and running rigging. Rig the rudder. Install a compass. Make some sail bags.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  29. #694
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    4,330

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Looking good Eric! I've always used "telltale​" because they always have something to say

  30. #695
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    Default Re: More Hartley

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugh MacD View Post
    Looking good Eric! I've always used "telltale​" because they always have something to say
    Good point! Thanks Hugh!
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  31. #696
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Charleston, SC
    Posts
    410

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Your sails look great!

  32. #697
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
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    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    855

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Thanks gray duck! They have been a challenge!
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  33. #698
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
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    855

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings from the Space Coast!

    DSC_4502a.jpg

    We are truly blessed to be living next to the water with space shots every other week. Here's a Falcon 9 from this week.

    The only real progress on the boat lately was to get the boat trailer registered and obtain a title for the boat. Done!

    I also went out looking at local boat ramps to launch the boat as close as possible to our house. Ballard Point Park in downtown Melbourne was one that I looked at. I'm looking for wide ramps with no drop offs. When I pulled up to the ramp, this boat was just getting out.

    BallardPoint_1a.jpg

    I think it will work for my needs, just need to get across the Indian River, through two drawbridges and there is the house. What could go wrong?

    So today I masked off the boat for putting down a second coat of non-skid in the upcoming days.

    DSCF8991_a.jpg

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    Last edited by FishoutaFlorida; 03-12-2022 at 01:10 PM.
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

  34. #699
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    4,330

    Default Re: More Hartley

    WOOHOO! That'll be exciting to pull the tape! Looking good!

  35. #700
    Join Date
    Jan 2017
    Location
    South Patrick Shores, USA
    Posts
    855

    Default Re: More Hartley

    Greetings all!

    Thanks Hugh!

    This painting is the second coat of the topside paint, in this case the Total Tread non-skid product. My thinking was that if I were to go with 2 coats, I could lay one coat when I had time for it and then finish up the 2nd coat later towards the end of construction. Cover up any blems that may have sprouted between the two coats.

    DSCF8994_a.jpg

    This is a shot of the cockpit sole right before the 2nd coat. If you look closely you can see the bits and pieces of stuff that messed up the first coat. I vacuumed, scruffed and cleaned the surfaces with denatured alcohol before painting.

    DSCF9002_a.jpg

    It's helped so far.

    DSCF8997_a.jpg

    Interesting how the "windshield" portion looks lighter than the new non-skid when they are the same colors are the same. The windshield portion is a topside paint of the same color, just missing the non-skid. I must have messed around with the settings of this photo.

    This paint seems to take a long time to dry/cure. Today was warm, but the next week will be cooler and I'm planning to stay away from the boat. Maybe a week or so based on the first coat. But once it gets set, it seems to be a very tough material.

    Upcoming items are to compute the shroud cut locations, worry and recheck the calc's several times, cut the shrouds and install the turnbuckles. Also need to finish up the deck hardware layout and install what I have so far...and a whole bunch of other things.

    For those of you who have come this far, I've got a question. The standing rigging for this boat is all new with measurements from standing up the mast and marking the shrouds and forestay with the top of the chain plates. My question is "should I locate the turnbuckle so that it would be midway through it's range of motion?" It seems obvious to me that it should to allow for the same amount of plus or minus overall length. But maybe newbies like me are prone to measure them with too much slack? Which could be accommodated by installing the turnbuckle that is set so it could make the shroud must shorter.

    Crazy talk I know, but I've got this fear of screwing this part up.

    More later.

    Thanks,

    Eric
    “Perpetual optimism is a force to live by.”

    Colin Powell

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