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Thread: spruce yard

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    46,335

    Default Re: spruce yard

    Quote Originally Posted by altfj View Post
    One more question, how do I determine where to attach the halyard? My yard will be 130 inches long.
    Sounds like you would benefit from a visit to Michael Storer's website, where there are various tutorials, and some excellent info on rigging lug sails -- https://www.storerboatplans.com/
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,831

    Default Re: spruce yard

    What are you using as a plan for this build? We always want the yard to be tail-heavy, meaning that the halyard tie-off point will be forward of the yard's middle, and sometimes by quite a bit. If you get the yard tie off too far aft, you will lose luff tension on the sail, which is bad (even to the point where the yard may want to dip and stand vertical losing all luff tension every time you relax mainsheet tension). You definitely don't want that happening.

    The placement of the halyard attachment on the yard will also have a certain amount of bearing on the boats helm balance as it can move the sail's center of effort fore or aft a bit. On a balanced lug, we also usually want the sail's luff to be roughly parallel to the mast, and the halyard attachment point can affect that as well as boom angle. Most of these things will show up on the sail plan and simply require a bit of tweaking once out on the water for your sea trials. If you don't have a plan, start with the halyard tied maybe 35% of the yard's length aft of the throat corner and start sailing, adjusting as needed to try to get a feel for what seems to work best.

    Understand that it can sometimes take the better part of a sailing season to really get a feel for a new rig, to become efficient and consistent at tacking and jibing, and to get a decent idea of how high you can generally point it efficiently. Doing this while also learning to sail can be a bit frustrating, but it gets better with time and practice.

  3. #38

    Default Re: spruce yard

    Ok, thanks muchly

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,379

    Default

    Here is a 12 foot yard, built of larch—structurally extremely close to doug fir. The spar is hollow bird’s mouth, which as Steve Bauer says, is not hard to do.



    The ratios/proportions are as Todd described in post #11. The pick up point for the halyard is 30% of the distance from heel to tip, per the designer’s plan. The sailmaker had me do bending tests to determine stiffness; he cut the sail (118sq ft standing lug) so that in calm, there is a slight wrinkle along the head of the sail parallel to the yard. As wind strength increases to the 5-10 mph range, the summer conditions I most commonly sail in, the yard begins to bend, and the wrinkle disappears as the sail takes it’s designed shape. You can see a bit of bend in the upper yard, and a hint of wrinkle in the sail in the photo above.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by John hartmann; 02-13-2018 at 08:30 AM.

  5. #40

    Default Re: spruce yard

    I think birds mouth is way beyond my capability but it does look nice. What type of boat is it on?

  6. #41
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Vermont
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    1,379

    Default

    If you have access to a table saw, a bird mouth spar is completely within reach. It is a simple formula for developing the appropriate stave size (40 percent of spar diameter for stave width, 20 percent for stave thickness, in it’s most basic iteration), and a 90 degree “V” shaped rabbet along one edge. A bunch of hose clamps or zip ties to hold things together while the glue dries, then easy clean up to get from 8 sided to round.
    The sail is for a Vivier designed Ilur:




    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
    Last edited by John hartmann; 02-13-2018 at 11:51 AM.

  7. #42

    Default Re: spruce yard

    I just totally screwed up the taper on my mast, disgusting, I thought I was going to have to buy a new one. Thank the heavens for hand planes, my joiner totally saved the day. I swear, it takes me more time to fix my mistakes than actually building the boat.
    Anyway, I don't have a table saw and after screwing up with my skill saw today, I may just go back to hand tools.
    Your boat looks totally awesome, Vivier makes some really cool looking designs.
    Last edited by altfj; 02-13-2018 at 04:04 PM.

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    1,379

    Default Re: spruce yard

    Fixing mistakes, and heading them off in the first place as you gain experience, is how we all develop as boat builders. Don’t beat yourself up over it. I wouldn’t tackle staves for a bird’s mouth spar with a skill saw.....a spar the size you are talking about should be an easy job with hand tools.
    Thanks for the kind words about the boat. Vivier is one among many designers who make very complete plan sets and kits for homebuilders. It’s a great time to be an amateur boat wright. To your original question, Doug fir should be easy to find, and would work well for your yard.

  9. #44

    Default Re: spruce yard

    Todd, what do you mean 40 to 45 % aft?

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
    Posts
    8,831

    Default Re: spruce yard

    40-45% aft of the heel (forward) end.

  11. #46

    Default Re: spruce yard

    Thanks Todd, I just want to mention that I got a beautiful piece of Sitka Spruce from Bob Stevens. Six inches wide and 2.25 inches thick, so I'll be able to make a yard and a boom. He also gave a really generous price. He has an incredible shop and does really nice work. I really appreciate this forum and the people who donate their time and resources to help us beginners. Thank you all!!

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