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Thread: Tent stoves

  1. #1
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    Default Tent stoves

    All this talk of stoves has me looking at something for my tent and my Sea Pearl.

    The Pearl is a very small boat for a stove but it has a nice convertible canvas cabin.

    Having a warm, dry fire for a couple of hours, with the option to move the stove to the tent seems like it would be nice.

    I've been looking at small, packable tent stoves. Specifically, the titanium models.

    e.g. http://titaniumgoat.com/cstove.html

    What do you guys think? Does anyone have any experience with these? There are also stainless tent stoves but heavier and maybe prone to rust after they are cooked hard.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Seems interesting, if you have access to (dry) firewood.

    I use this http://trangia.se/en/camping-stoves-...5/duossal-2-0/ with a gas (Propane? Not sure) adapter.
    For cooking, that works exceptionally well for me, since the flame is adjustable. But not so sure it would be optimal for heating.

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student, a rigger apprentice and Journeyman http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    It does look interesting. I have generally heated boats with candles or lanterns. Wandering Star is big enough to have an oven, which heats the cabin when necessary.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    On a couple of my old boats we used to carry a big terra-cotta flowerpot. Inverted over the cookstove, the pot created some thermal mass and had lots of surface area to radiate heat. Worked fine to take the chill off in the morning and then could be used as a "cloche" for baking bread over a cast iron pan.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    I'm about to make a few stoves for various non-boat projects, but I think one of these would be good to have on a boat..just takes heat out of the flue a bit, if you have a flue of course.

    https://www.belltent.co.uk/water_hea...portable_stove

    xfrontier_stove_water_heater_3-1200x813.jpg.pagespeed.ic.8fkkAHYze8.jpg

    Have a look at the stove it fits on; I've been threatening for some time now to turn a small fire extinguisher into a small gimballed wood stove, with cooking surface on the top surface. Heat and cooking aplenty in one item. If you're just trying to take the chill of a small cabin, a kero or gas cooking stove will do it, but if you want to really dry your woolly socks, and be snug as anything, go wood stove.

    I'm not into pressurised hydrocarbons on a boat; others mileage may vary. I tend to trust my own piping, but not that inside the cooker/stove itself, and that's one less thing to maintain religiously. I have sailed with pressurised parrafin cookers like Taylors which were great, but not on my boat. I cook on several Origos, liquid alcohol filled wadding under the burner plate. They are gimbaled both ways... buying gimbals for them is extremely expensive for what they are, so I made my gimbals, and pot holders. Fuel storage is a stainless fuel tank with a tap that fills the correctly sized container for one top up, done before cooking, or at beginning of the day. Wood stove at the moment for me is a backup cooker, but primarily for warmth.

    origo-1500_1.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 02-05-2018 at 03:38 PM.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Having said all that, I found these in my fathers loft a while ago.... and it's got me thinking. I've got the seal kits, but have not commenced the fettle yet.
    I think part of my hesitance has been the pre-heat nonsense involved. You really want that on a boat?

    IMG_5411.jpg

    IMG_5412.jpg
    Last edited by lupussonic; 02-05-2018 at 04:51 PM.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Just attachment numbers no images
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Choose a stove that has a good stable base. You don't want your coffee leaping into the bilge --or into your lap-- when someone comes by too fast throwing a big wake.

    Small stoves I have used:

    MSR Whisperlight: good stability, excellent reliability, easy to stow. Drawback: white gas/coleman fuel can be dangerous stuff, especially in the close confines of a boat, where you can't necessarily run away if something goes badly wrong. It did rust a little, but not badly.

    Trangia: good fuel safety, good stability (including the official potstand). Not so easy to stow as the Whisperlite, but not bad. It doesn't cook as fast as I like, but I'm not using the complete Trangia set, which probably makes a difference. I still like it, though.

    Svea 123: reliable, easy to stow; brass, so no rust. *Abominable* stability on a boat, and white gas is dangerous. I love it on land, but it only took one overnight to show me it was a bad idea on the boat.

    Optimus 111: reliable, moderately easy to stow. Rust issues are possible, on the steel case. Moderately good stability --it doesn't have a tripod potstand system, and pots can slide around on the parallel rails in rough water. Very loud burner. You need to be conscientious to keep it in good fettle, and parts can be challenging to find. Kero models are available, but the white gas version is the most common, so fuel safety is a consideration.

    Optimus 45: reliable, simple to use (especially if you can find one with a regulated burner), easy to maintain, big fuel tank. Moderately easy to stow. Moderately good stability. Brass, so rust is not an issue. Both kero and alkie versions have excellent fuel safety. Very loud burner. Parts are specialty items, but there's an active "stovie" community where parts are available, and it doesn't have moving parts (unless you have a regulated burner) so maintenance is easy.

    Optimus 48: identical stove to the Op45, but with a much quieter burner.

    Optimus 00: a smaller, easier to stow version of the Op45.

    I think one of these would be good to have on a boat..just takes heat out of the flue a bit, if you have a flue of course.
    I want a flue just so I can have that water heater.

    Alex

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by P.I. Stazzer-Newt View Post
    Just attachment numbers no images
    Fixed I hope..

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    I have a Sea Pearl......the tent enclosure is pretty small. I can't think of a situation where I'd want to be inside with anything that has an open flame. I use one of these to take the chill off.

    https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000KA2JG8/ref=ice_ac_b_dpb_twi_col_ti_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1517 867299&sr=8-4&keywords=candle+lantern
    Take Care,
    Steve W

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    One thing I really like with the Trangia is that the burner can be used with this too https://www.clasohlson.com/uk/ABU-Smoker/34-3137 (a two burner smoker, but there is a smaller one with just one).
    My tent is about 50 cm high at its highest and while I have cooked inside it (snowstorm up in the mountains) I prefer to do all cooking outdoors.

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student, a rigger apprentice and Journeyman http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Having said all that, I found these in my fathers loft a while ago.... and it's got me thinking. I've got the seal kits, but have not commenced the fettle yet.
    Lupussonic, you don't want those. Horrible, cranky, fussy antiques. Much too much trouble to fettle them. Just send them to me.

    (In case it isn't clear that I'm a big fan of that style of stove, this is what I use aboard my sloop, Bucephalus):



    I think part of my hesitance has been the pre-heat nonsense involved. You really want that on a boat?
    It isn't that big a deal once you get the hang of it, but there is definitely potential for an adrenaline rush while you're climbing the learning curve. Anyone should start their education with the stove outside the tent, no canvas (or synthetic cloth!) over head.

    I have a Sea Pearl......the tent enclosure is pretty small. I can't think of a situation where I'd want to be inside with anything that has an open flame. I use one of these to take the chill off.
    I use two of those as Bucephalus's cabin lights. They're pretty wonderful. Good light; good warmth. Rumor has it you can use the three-candle model as a stove.

    Alex

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Yes I saw that several years ago.. Another thread, perhaps your gimbal / stove thread... Wonderful!

    Just seen the cast iron gimbal for these stoves, very nice too.

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post
    Choose a stove that has a good stable base. You don't want your coffee leaping into the bilge --or into your lap-- when someone comes by too fast throwing a big wake.

    Small stoves I have used:

    MSR Whisperlight: good stability, excellent reliability, easy to stow. Drawback: white gas/coleman fuel can be dangerous stuff, especially in the close confines of a boat, where you can't necessarily run away if something goes badly wrong. It did rust a little, but not badly.

    Trangia: good fuel safety, good stability (including the official potstand). Not so easy to stow as the Whisperlite, but not bad. It doesn't cook as fast as I like, but I'm not using the complete Trangia set, which probably makes a difference. I still like it, though.

    Svea 123: reliable, easy to stow; brass, so no rust. *Abominable* stability on a boat, and white gas is dangerous. I love it on land, but it only took one overnight to show me it was a bad idea on the boat.

    Optimus 111: reliable, moderately easy to stow. Rust issues are possible, on the steel case. Moderately good stability --it doesn't have a tripod potstand system, and pots can slide around on the parallel rails in rough water. Very loud burner. You need to be conscientious to keep it in good fettle, and parts can be challenging to find. Kero models are available, but the white gas version is the most common, so fuel safety is a consideration.

    Optimus 45: reliable, simple to use (especially if you can find one with a regulated burner), easy to maintain, big fuel tank. Moderately easy to stow. Moderately good stability. Brass, so rust is not an issue. Both kero and alkie versions have excellent fuel safety. Very loud burner. Parts are specialty items, but there's an active "stovie" community where parts are available, and it doesn't have moving parts (unless you have a regulated burner) so maintenance is easy.

    Optimus 48: identical stove to the Op45, but with a much quieter burner.

    Optimus 00: a smaller, easier to stow version of the Op45.



    I want a flue just so I can have that water heater.

    Alex
    there must be different versions of the Optimus 111.
    Mine is very quiet.
    Preheat is a pain.Less dramatic since we've been using priming paste,instead of a big dribble of naphtha.
    R
    Sleep with one eye open.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    there must be different versions of the Optimus 111.
    Mine is very quiet.
    You're right: the Op111 "Hiker" is a silent burner. I should have remembered that. Thanks.

    Priming paste is always good, though it leaves residue.

    Alex

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    That titanium stove looks nice but bulky and similar to the "hobo" stoves we used to make out of square gallon cans...cut one end out to stuff in wood and use the flat side of the can for pots.

    My go to camp/cruise stove for small boats is either the Optimus Hiker 111 or the Optimus Hunter 8R. More times than not I grab the 8R. The Hiker has felt in the priming cup which makes it easier to crack the valve open to let fuel in for starting. I use a glass eye dropper for transferring gas from the tank to the primer cup on the 8R. The downside with using gas to atomize is the soot. Alcohol is cleaner to use when I don't want to soot up the pots and pans. My Hiker was purchased in 2001 and has the roaring burner. I think they have 3 versions from quiet to loud. The roar is ok to me because I can hear what the flame is doing from a distance. The nice thing about these stoves is they pack in their own case and are major reliable. The Hiker has jets for several fuels. I prefer gas and use Coleman fuel but its nice to have the option.

    I have a small butane type and used to have single burner Coleman dual fuel...it looked like one of their lanterns except with a burner instead of globe. If I was starting over again from scratch I'd probably go with another one of those. Being confined to using butane canisters is inconvenient for me so I avoid using that stove most of the time.

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Tent stoves


  18. #18
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    If heating is important, not just cooking, the small backpack stoves aren't much good. Since you'll be carrying the stove on a boat, not your back, one trick is to set a terracotta flowerpot on the stove to absorb and radiate heat. (Which makes it top heavy.)

    Any liquid-fuel pressure stove is a serious hazard inside a tent of any sort. If your Sea Pearl tent is cotton canvas, that's flame-resistant. If it's synthetic, it can torch pretty quickly. (As a backcountry ranger, I did first aid and evacs for campers who'd flash-burned their tents trying to cook inside during storms. Pretty ugly.)

    Gas canister stoves are safer. I've built hanging cookers using a cheap aluminum saucepan and a Trangia meths burner, the hazard being that it has an open top and if you bump it or it gets upset by a wake, it spreads burning alcohol. That's not as bad as white gas, but it can do damage. Since all these stoves exhaust inside the tent, fumes and carbon monoxide are also hazards. That said, I've used my homebuilt cooker for camp cruising in a Hartley 14, with a cuddy cabin with no mishaps. I've also hung it from branches, etc. on rocky shores.





    If the primary use is for heating, the Goat stoves look reasonably good, given proper installation. The stove should be fastened down with some quick-release thingie. The stovepipe needs to be routed so that it won't get caught and snatched up by a flapping tent or bashed with a swinging boom. It also needs to be high enough that the soot and cinders won't light on the tent roof or in the boat, with a spark arrester mesh cap.

    Fabricating the wood stoves from titanium seems like a costly gimmick. It'd be simple to make one from a piece of standard black stovepipe and various off the shelf components (none very heavy) with rivets and bolts, in an hour or so.

    If you can find a military surplus tent stove, such as the US Army Yukon stove, that might be quicker and cheaper. I've got one and have used it in an 8 x 10 canvas springbar tent that I lived in for several seasons in the high country.


    I bought mine for about $25, but that was years ago.

    In any event, good luck—
    Last edited by Chip-skiff; 02-06-2018 at 04:28 PM.
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  19. #19
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Small note: I think the OP's interest in titanium was more about avoiding rust than mitigating weight.

    Alex

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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    The downside with using gas to atomize is the soot. Alcohol is cleaner to use when I don't want to soot up the pots and pans.
    Perhaps I misunderstand you, but my primary reason for switching to gas from alcohol with my Trangia back in 88 or so was because of the soot the alcohol burner produced, none whatsoever with the gas burner.

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student, a rigger apprentice and Journeyman http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/

  21. #21
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by mohsart View Post
    Perhaps I misunderstand you, but my primary reason for switching to gas from alcohol with my Trangia back in 88 or so was because of the soot the alcohol burner produced, none whatsoever with the gas burner.

    /Mats
    In my experience PRIMING with gas produces way more soot than priming with alcohol and alcohol has burned cleaner. I lived aboard 2 yrs with a 2 burner pressurized Kenyon alcohol stove with alcohol priming and another 8 yrs with an Optimus 2 burner kero stove which was a somewhat dirty flame but it primed with alcohol. My Hiker and 8R are way sooty with gas priming compared to alcohol. Could be just the type of burners I used but all have been Optimus/Primus.

    I like alcohol for the safety but the btu count is low and cost is high. The bad part of alcohol is the flame is harder to see if you have a flair up from spills...but the flip side is a glass of water will take it out.

    I keep sterno stoves as backups and they work well too without soot.

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    I solved the Svea stabillity problem for an oar sail boat with a hole saw Took a piece of 3/4, don't remember what it was only that it was a couple of inches wider than the 123. Set up one of those variable hole saws to match and cut a hole in it. Bit of wood goes on thwart with a spring clamp or two. Stove goes into hole and is nice and stable. The pot on top is another question.
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

  23. #23
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    I also use an antique "roarer" on my small (24') boat. I use "silent burners "on the big boat.
    I have nothing to add to the value of "tent stoves",
    just to say that one can put a little saand in the priming cup to prevent the alcohol from sloshing aot and about, and I use odorless paint thinner, not kerosene. It pre heats easier and does not make soot.

    Yes, I also have an engine "bus" heater and a Hi Seas diesel heater. I hate being cold.

  24. #24
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    The sand in the priming cup is a *very* clever idea, Wizbang. (And it's cool seeing a simple Op45 roarer in a Bremer Sea-Swing.)

    I used a more complicated way --of course-- to solve the same problem of the primer sloshing about: I took a short length of rock-wool woodstove gasket and worked it into a grommet just the size to fill the spirit cup. It works like a charm; no sloshing. The loose braid of the gasket makes it adequately elastic to stretch out around the burner as you're putting it onto the stove, then shrink down to perfectly fit the spirit cup.

    I also soaked that "wick" in a high-concentration baking soda solution, then let it dry. The residual baking soda causes the otherwise-invisible alcohol flame to burn yellow, so I can tell when the priming has or hasn't yet burnt out.

    Alex

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    If you use a wick for priming then Kero can be used as the priming fuel.

    The first silent 111 is the 111T - has regulated silent burner and will run equally well on gasoline or kero - with some minor tweaks can be made to run on alcohol.
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Interesting info. I've got the current production Butterfly stove (looks like a Primus copy).

    I love it. I run with K-1 and prime with alcohol. But the primer cup fills with syrupy goo every few uses.

    Any ideas? I thought it was normal but I'm not getting the impression that it is from y'alls discussion. Maybe I'm not opening the relief valve enough when I turn it off?

    https://www.smokehomegarden.com/stor...993a92bb11dac3

  27. #27
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    When you turn it off - open the relief valve - and leave it open - if the valve is closed then thermal cycles will cause the tank to pump a small amount of fuel through the burner into the primer cup - leaving the vent open allows the pressure to equalise - preventing this problem.


    N.B. that pressure relief valve is the reason that you must NEVER fill the stove with gasoline.
    Someday, I'm going to settle down and be a grumpy old man.

  28. #28
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    K1...yuk. It makes the whole vessel stink ,whether it's being run or not....no?
    Same with Kerosene wick lamps, I can smell it instantly coming aboard a boat that has them, lit or not.
    bruce

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by BillP View Post
    In my experience PRIMING with gas produces way more soot than priming with alcohol
    I see, I only used stoves that needed priming a couple of times. And by gas I meant gas, not gasoline :-)

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student, a rigger apprentice and Journeyman http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/

  30. #30
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by mohsart View Post
    I see, I only used stoves that needed priming a couple of times. And by gas I meant gas, not gasoline :-)

    /Mats
    I've only used denatured alcohol for cooking (pressurized) and priming. Beside the high price, one of the issues I had with alcohol was inconsistency. Some brands would barely burn and had weird colors while other brands burned as expected. On the Hiker and R8 I use Coleman fuel 99% of the time but have used regular car gas a few times in the R8 to test it. The car gas gives off undesirable fumes in comparison to the coleman fuel but cooks ok. When I was using kerosene the odor was there but we got used to it. Flame tamers were needed with the kero to simmer. I burned mineral spirits in our wick type cabin lamps to eliminate the kero odor. Mineral spirts burned way cleaner but I never tried it in my stoves.

  31. #31
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Quote Originally Posted by Pitsligo View Post



    I want a flue just so I can have that water heater.

    Alex

    Maybe you could fit the smaller Cubic Mini.


  32. #32
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    If you use a wick for priming then Kero can be used as the priming fuel.
    Yeah, but it smokes like a demon and stinks even worse. For my money, meths is the cleanest primer. Kero doesn't smell too bad once the burner is hot enough to get good combustion, but if you don't prime adequately, or don't *completely* bleed the pressure --right now!-- on shutdown, the cabin stinks in no time. My ex had a bad enough time with the smell that I modified the boat with a cockpit locker for the stove and lamp founts, to keep the worst of the smell out of the cabin.

    When you turn it off - open the relief valve - and leave it open - if the valve is closed then thermal cycles will cause the tank to pump a small amount of fuel through the burner into the primer cup - leaving the vent open allows the pressure to equalise - preventing this problem.
    See that red flag on the stove in post #12? That's my "Remove Before Flight" tag, that keeps the airscrew open when the stove isn't lit. It only took me one hot day and returning to the boat to find kero burped all over the cabin to realize the necessity.

    Maybe you could fit the smaller Cubic Mini.
    Don't I wish! Bucephalus's cabin is way too small.

    Alex

  33. #33
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    My wife cannot stand Sterno burining in the cabin to prime the old two burner Optimus which is no longer usable. That is why we are switching over to a force 10 CNG stove on our H28. The bonus is that it has an oven! We will still use the Fatsco for cabin heating. I am installing this in the Spring.
    And believe the Force 10 to be a good choice since CNG is lighter than air and that reduces the chance of having a bilge explosion to next to nada!
    Jay

  34. #34
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Holy smokes! I got my titanium stove last night. Wow! It's much better put together than I expected. I harvested some old post oak that died in the drought a couple of years ago and wull have a burn this weekend.

    Zero buyers' remorse. I've wanted a wood stove for 30 years. And I have an unnatural affection for titanium.

    I ended up going with this one.

    http://www.rutalocura.com/ti_stove.html

    The damper looked like a better design. It says out of stock but he agreed to make one for me. Got it in less than a week.

  35. #35
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    Default Re: Tent stoves

    Thread has kind of morphed to small cabin stoves. Just sayin'
    Ben Fuller
    Ran Tan, Liten Kuhling, Tipsy, Tippy, Josef W., Merry Mouth, Imp, Macavity, Look Far, Flash and a quiver of other 'yaks.
    "Bound fast is boatless man."

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