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Thread: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

  1. #1
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    Default First Canoe Build: White Guide 18.5 Footer

    Hi All,


    I have been reading and taking notes of many things on this forum and slowly working on my first canoe. My uncle had built a 16 foot chestnut prospector some 15 or so years ago and i always thought it was a thing of beauty. Last year i took it up for some paddling in Canada and fell in love with the idea of building my own. What better time than over winter? I picked up Canoecraft and How to build a cedar strip by Gil to get the best understanding of each step. Also, youtube is helpful to see it in action. Anyways, I have a few questions and curiosities about the process so far. Feel free to throw anything and everything out there for me to consider in this build.

    Station forms:

    What is the margin of error for these? As in, while cutting them maybe the jig saw wanders a little inside the line. Do i need to be concerned about that or will the strips cover it up? I plan to build it without staples. I know i cannot be perfect in every step but trying to set myself up as best as possible.

    Gil recommends cutting out 4 pieces for the stems and laminating them together to make the two needed, but twice as thick as the other forms. Is this pivotal? I have seen variations of it, so was curious how you went about it.

    Wood:

    I plan to mill my own strips. My uncle has the bead and cove bits, so i just need the wood and a planer.

    I plan to use western red cedar. What have you paid for wood on similar size canoes? I am looking to get 75 board feet. I know it is not necessary but think it would make things easier to get 20 foots strips, if possible. One place is http://medfordcedar.com/. Has anyone use their wood? Do you have any recommendations for places to check out in the 1-2 hours of Northeast, MD?

    Also, besides clear, tight grained wood, and straight pieces, should i look for anything else to ensure quality wood?

    Thank you for any and all help. My uncles canoe:

    DSC_0767a.jpg

    IMAG0862a.jpg

    -Robbie
    Last edited by Traveling Sub; 01-28-2018 at 07:35 PM. Reason: Spelling

  2. #2
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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Robbie welcome aboard!
    I want to ask you a question and I want you to think do you really need a 18.50' canoe??

    Gil is kind of seat of the pants builder, but you will find that you have to maneuver bevel trim shave even remake forms to get what is called a fair lay of the strips. You arrive at that by using a strip as what is called a batten strip and a "moaning chair"

    NJ white cedar is great.. but short.. you will lucky to find 7ft long.

    I see Medford has long Atlantic WC,. Good to know $$$

    White Cedar and red Cedars although both Cedar and light in weight are very very different Woods in working qualities.

    Every strip boat builder gets obsessed with finding clear LONG stock.. after the 3 builds we gave up and went with the cedar deck boards ripped into random length.

    After 6 strip builds I made the conscious decision to build traditional wood canvas canoes and boats.

    Sawn strips are ok, don't really need a planer, no staples.. I don't agree. but some want to obsess about that when a hot water soak closes staple holes well enough. Stems.. you can make anyway you want. strip canoes don't have to have stems. and they are more cosmetic then structural. you can soak wood and gain some flex, you can also over bend them, then glue over the form. or steam bend.

    All our builds were canoecraft. my prospector is at my Daughter's on Signal Mtn TN rotting in her back yard.. so much for a build and gift of love...


    Last edited by DeniseO30; 01-28-2018 at 04:25 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  3. #3
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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Hey Denise,

    Thank you and i appreciate the response; i was out for the better part of today.

    I probably do not need an 18 foot canoe but from what i have seen (style and beauty) and the fact that i want to use it for a tripping canoe, it made sense for me to pick that one out of Gil's designs. It does sound like there will be a lot of adjustments as I go in building it but i have yet to get my moaning chair out. I should probably get one to start with.

    How thick are your stem forms? do you laminate two pieces of wood so it is about 1.5 inches thick?

    Do you not use a planer then? That would make it a bit easier on the budget. I am guessing after the are sewn, they should be pretty uniform.

    hmmm i may have to consider staples in that case. Especially if they are unnoticeable.

    Beautiful canoes by the way!

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Sub View Post
    Hey Denise,

    Thank you and i appreciate the response; i was out for the better part of today.

    I probably do not need an 18 foot canoe but from what i have seen (style and beauty) and the fact that i want to use it for a tripping canoe, it made sense for me to pick that one out of Gil's designs. It does sound like there will be a lot of adjustments as I go in building it but i have yet to get my moaning chair out. I should probably get one to start with.

    How thick are your stem forms? do you laminate two pieces of wood so it is about 1.5 inches thick?

    Do you not use a planer then? That would make it a bit easier on the budget. I am guessing after the are sewn, they should be pretty uniform.

    hmmm i may have to consider staples in that case. Especially if they are unnoticeable.

    Beautiful canoes by the way!
    An 18-foot canoe is great if you can carry. Withmy 16 foot prospector, we used to go for a week.

    we made the forms in 3/4" plywood or particle board the Staples held as long as you didn't pull them and re staple.

    We got real good at using cheater strips so we didn't have to coax twist or steam, boil, or scream & shout to get some of the strips around the bilge turn and into the bow or Stern.

    If you think about it, the strips are going to be sanded and or scraped into shape on both sides so there's really no reason to have an ultra nice finish when they come off the Saw or out of a planer. Bead and Cove is great but you can get by without it where the strips lay rather flat without a curve to the bilge. We use Titebond for the glued also.

    I made a tiny miter box to cut miniature scarf joints in place on the strips as we built the boat. It works out pretty good, like doing a wood floor!


    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    More lol
    This is the Redbird. I deleted almost everything on Photobucket I was so angry when they held everybody hostage and I'm too lazy to rescan everything

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Thanks again! Do you have a picture of the miter box? I love seeing tools used in a creative way!

    I agree photobucket is trash now.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Sub View Post
    Thanks again! Do you have a picture of the miter box? I love seeing tools used in a creative way!

    I agree photobucket is trash now.
    No, it was quite some time ago at least 15 years. Scarf joints in the strips don't have to be structural because they are going to be in case so a 45 or more is all they need it. a cut like that can be done freehand to just hold the two strips and a fine-tooth saw at the angle you want and the two strips will match each other when he put them together. The joints will only be highly noticeable if he use mismatched strips like dark against light

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Get Canoecraft by Ted Moore's and don't look back. By far the definitive treatise on all things about strip building canoes. I made a jig on my miterbox(12" Dewalt non sliding) I clamped a piece of wood to the fence and table and cut them at I think and 8:1 angle or there about. I used aspen so the color was very close and the scarfs are almost unnoticeable which I was going for. I've also seen many butt joints on canoes over the years. Since the whole thing is getting encapsulated in cloth and resin the wood becomes a core that can look anyway you like it. I used 3/4" MDF(it was free) for my station molds on both builds but I wasnt worried about staples staying put since I did a stapleless build on both my boats.

    Good Luck. I love my 15' Ranger Prospector BTW. Best canoe I've paddled. (of course I am partial)

    Good Luck!
    Todd

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    As to your ? about station molds yes they have to be close. The offset tables in Canoecraft and I suspect sold with other canoe plans by Ted Moores are really very close. I cut my molds out with a jig saw close to the line and then sanded them down to the line a belt/oscillating spindle sander to get them right to the line. I checked with a batten and they were right on after i set them up on the strongback. I cant speak to gills book and mold patterns. I own his book but it was more for reference.

    I agree with Denise30 don't get hung up on long stock. I used 16' deck boards from Menards hand picked by me from about 500 in stock. I was fussy and was able to get 6 fairly clear boards. Some small knots and imperfections but for the price at a $1 per linear foot at the time I couldn't go wrong as far as I saw it. I've since looked and the quality just hasn't been the same. The next boat I scarfed every strip since I couldn't get aspen in lengths over 8'. It is a Wee Lassie II - another good reference book from Mack McCarthy. The section on caning seats is excellent.

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    I am not sure if Gil's measurements are true to the originals, but I have had two original EM White 18.5 ft Guide wood and canvas canoes and I enjoy those big old Guide canoes. I traded one that was kind of my daily driver and have regretted it ever since. I have another EM White Guide now that is in very good original condition (closed gunwales) and it is waiting for me to put new skin on it. I always liked the lines of the White Guide. There is something reminiscent of old bark canoes left in those lines.

    I found the one I traded to be and exceptionally speedy canoe. It was a fine tripping canoe and friends would comment on its performance. It had low freeboard, but I expect a previous restorer may have trimmed the old rails off and installed new ones making the canoe an inch or so shallower. The long water line is good for glide and for shallow Maine Streams. The first two photos are the one I traded. It handled a good load (there is a 100 pound cast iron griddle plus gear in the bilge) and two dogs. The next three are my replacement project. Keep us posted on your project.

    IMG_0464.jpgIMG_0446.jpgIMG_0598.JPGbow.jpgDeck.jpg
    Last edited by Fitz; 01-30-2018 at 03:19 PM.
    "Wherever there is a channel for water, there is a road for the canoe. " - Thoreau

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fitz View Post
    I am not sure if Gil's measurements are true to the originals, but I have had two original EM White 18.5 ft Guide wood and canvas canoes and I enjoy those big old Guide canoes. I traded one that was kind of my daily driver and have regretted it ever since. I have another EM White Guide now that is in very good original condition (closed gunwales) and it is waiting for me to put new skin on it. I always liked the lines of the White Guide. There is something reminiscent of old bark canoes left in those lines.

    I found the one I traded to be and exceptionally speedy canoe. It was a fine tripping canoe and friends would comment on its performance. It had low freeboard, but I expect a previous restorer may have trimmed the old rails off and installed new ones making the canoe an inch or so shallower. The long water line is good for glide and for shallow Maine Streams. The first two photos are the one I traded. It handled a good load (there is a 100 pound cast iron griddle plus gear in the bilge) and two dogs. The next three are my replacement project. Keep us posted on your project.

    IMG_0464.jpgIMG_0446.jpgIMG_0598.JPGbow.jpgDeck.jpg
    I can't deny longer boats are faster. The few times I paddled my old town 18-footer I was pretty surprised how easily it moved through the watebr />
    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Thank you for all the advise, i will take this into consideration in my building and keep you all update as i can!

    For now, i am doing a little skiing.

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: White Guide 18.5 Footer

    Quote Originally Posted by Traveling Sub View Post
    Hi All,


    I have been reading and taking notes of many things on this forum and slowly working on my first canoe. My uncle had built a 16 foot chestnut prospector some 15 or so years ago and i always thought it was a thing of beauty. Last year i took it up for some paddling in Canada and fell in love with the idea of building my own. What better time than over winter? I picked up Canoecraft and How to build a cedar strip by Gil to get the best understanding of each step. Also, youtube is helpful to see it in action. Anyways, I have a few questions and curiosities about the process so far. Feel free to throw anything and everything out there for me to consider in this build.

    Station forms:

    What is the margin of error for these? As in, while cutting them maybe the jig saw wanders a little inside the line. Do i need to be concerned about that or will the strips cover it up? I plan to build it without staples. I know i cannot be perfect in every step but trying to set myself up as best as possible.

    Gil recommends cutting out 4 pieces for the stems and laminating them together to make the two needed, but twice as thick as the other forms. Is this pivotal? I have seen variations of it, so was curious how you went about it.

    Wood:

    I plan to mill my own strips. My uncle has the bead and cove bits, so i just need the wood and a planer.

    I plan to use western red cedar. What have you paid for wood on similar size canoes? I am looking to get 75 board feet. I know it is not necessary but think it would make things easier to get 20 foots strips, if possible. One place is http://medfordcedar.com/. Has anyone use their wood? Do you have any recommendations for places to check out in the 1-2 hours of Northeast, MD?

    Also, besides clear, tight grained wood, and straight pieces, should i look for anything else to ensure quality wood?

    Thank you for any and all help. My uncles canoe:

    DSC_0767a.jpg

    IMAG0862a.jpg

    -Robbie
    My first canoe was the 18-1/2' EM White design from Gilpatrick's book. I shortened it to 18'. The station lines were fine. Transferred to 1/2" EX plywood cut with jig saw and edge sanded to lines. I used Dave Hazen's building method without stems to keep the canoe as lightweight as possible and used 3/16" thick strips, no bead and cove, but hand beveled strip joints. 4 oz S-glass fiberglass with System Three Epoxy. The canoe was 55 pounds. One great canoe, fast, fun and carrys everything for extended wilderness trips.

    I've built more than a hundred stripper boats. You may wish to consult all my "Shop Tips" pages for details on my Stapleless Stripping methods @ http://www.laughingloon.com/shop.tips.html

    And you can see my building methods on YouTube @ https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCX4...18TJRJnghgiIQw

    Start with "Building Ootek Part One"

    Most info concerns kayaks but works for canoes too.


    All the best,
    Rob Macks
    Laughing Loon Custom Canoes & Kayaks
    http://www.laughingloon.com/
    207-549-3531


    “All things are difficult before they are easy.” - Thomas Fuller

  14. #14
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    I used to run my prospector on rivers mostly class 1 and 2 but occasionally 3 and 4 and only once on 5 which was lol a mistake, she split right down the middle when we climbed over a sharp Rock as my son was paddling a boat over to see the girl floating by in a rubber raft lol. The prospector really comes to life in moving water as is true for most all canoes except maybe the racing types. I used to love it, I still miss it. I'll not likely be doing it again now that I'm "older"

    My only strong suggestion would be! Don't be in a hurry to Varnish the hull after the boat is built. Get her out there test her out see if the bottom oil cans or if the boat in general is okay because once you varnish the fiberglass it's miserable to remove.

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    No, it was quite some time ago at least 15 years. Scarf joints in the strips don't have to be structural because they are going to be in case so a 45 or more is all they need it. a cut like that can be done freehand to just hold the two strips and a fine-tooth saw at the angle you want and the two strips will match each other when he put them together. The joints will only be highly noticeable if he use mismatched strips like dark against light

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    If I remember, X-acto used to make a small miter box and saw - I don't know if that would be big enough for your strips, but similar to what you may need

    Rick

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: White Guide 18.5 Footer

    Thank you, Rob.

    I am getting more into it this week/weekend so will take this all into consideration. I will post pics up once i get something worth taking pics of lol

  17. #17
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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Hey all, finally getting back on the boat finally and on here for a few questions.

    I have the forms up on the strong back and set to add the strips but still need the wood. From my estimates, i find it hard to predict how much word (in board feet or linear feet) that i will need. It happens to be the same boat that Gil builds in his book and he calls for 75 board feet or 1800 or so linear feet. Does this sound right for the 18.5 foot white guide canoe with at 35" width? I really dont think i would need 90 canoe length strips for a canoe. It seems high as i found another estimate that a 15 foot canoe uses 1024 linear feet. By extrapolating those numbers it is 1200-1300 linear feet (I know it generally would not translate very well from one to another). Any advise would be great!

    My second question, is it cheaper to buy boards that are 6" wide vs 12" or does the amount of waste make it negligible?

  18. #18
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    That is a big canoe are you actually sure you need one that large?

    For canoe strips you need one by anything they can be deck boards, plain boards, framing boards dressed down, most of our strip canoes were built from deck boards finished out to about 7/8" with the bead cove.

    My son was pretty good at using a hand-held circular saw with a rip guide.

    I tend to stick with the table saw and rip fence,

    I do not feel there is necessity for perfection in the strips because they're going to be sanded scraped glued, bent and twisted, on the canoe.

    Years ago I did find 18 foot red cedar but it was at a premium price and I did buy it, but every canoe after was built from Big Box store knotty Cedar lol.

    Either way it's a lot of cutting.
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 05-25-2018 at 07:57 AM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    https://ashesstillwaterboats.com/how...ls-calculator/

    Here is a materials calculator, it might help.

    I like 17’-18’ canoes.
    Last edited by Matt young; 05-24-2018 at 06:13 PM.
    "Yeah, well, that's just, like your opinion man"
    -The Dude-

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Awesome Matt, that is the best one i have seen yet. For whatever reason, it did not appear in my searches.

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    While working in a bicycle shop, I was building strip canoes in my spare time. My observation is that most people end up with a bicycle that is too big, and a canoe that is too small. Our local water is shallow and rocky, so the bigger boats with less draft work well. Unlike bicycle camping where you have to watch every ounce, canoe camping was a luxury because I could take my cast iron skillet, lawn chairs, whatever I want. For a tandem canoe, 16' is a compromise, 17' is better, and if there are more than 2 people or camping gear, 18' is about right. (Of course, the beam and cross section enter into the equation as well.)

    Gil Gilpatrick's book sets the bar rather low for craftsmanship. Most people can do better work if inspired and informed by better construction goals. Canoecraft is good, as is Featherweight Boatbuilding by Mac McCarthy (tho McCarthy's book is mostly about solo designs).

    You definitely do not need a planer for the strips. I am assuming you are using a table saw to rip the strips, right? If so, with proper featherboards you should be able to controll the thickness of the strips +/- 1/32" or there abouts. After it's stripped, the hull requires extensive fairing and sanding which will remove any marks left by the rip saw.

    I never made a wood inner stem for my cedar strippers. My stem form was a single thickness of plywood, beveled to a thin edge, so the ends of the strips from each side just about meet at the ends. Once the hull is stripped, I trimmed the strips square at the ends, then wrapped a thin hardwood strip around the stems to cover the ends of the strips. After the hull is glassed (with an extra bias strip over the stems), I turned the canoe over and filled the inside of the stems with a peanut butter thick epoxy. Before the epoxy set, I bent another thin strip of wood inside the stems to cover the epoxy fillet.

    You can't see the top of the epoxy-fillet inner stem in this photo because it's covered by the brass strip, but you can see the thin outer stem.



    In the next photo, notice the batten coming out from under the rear bulkhead; that strip continues up into the stem area and contains the thickened epoxy fillet that forms the inner stem.


    A few more photos <here> but I don't have any good close shots showing the stem details. This "wet-stem" method does not require laminating or gluing up an elaborate stem or cutting bevels.
    Last edited by runswithsizzers; 05-24-2018 at 09:54 PM.

  22. #22
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    "raises eyebrow"

    Beveled stem making, laminated or steam bent is; elaborate??

    But I taper gunnels also. Strip or w/c


    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Quote Originally Posted by runswithsizzers View Post
    While working in a bicycle shop, I was building strip canoes in my spare time. My observation is that most people end up with a bicycle that is too big, and a canoe that is too small. Our local water is shallow and rocky, so the bigger boats with less draft work well. Unlike bicycle camping where you have to watch every ounce, canoe camping was a luxury because I could take my cast iron skillet, lawn chairs, whatever I want. For a tandem canoe, 16' is a compromise, 17' is better, and if there are more than 2 people or camping gear, 18' is about right. (Of course, the beam and cross section enter into the equation as well.)

    Gil Gilpatrick's book sets the bar rather low for craftsmanship. Most people can do better work if inspired and informed by better construction goals. Canoecraft is good, as is Featherweight Boatbuilding by Mac McCarthy (tho McCarthy's book is mostly about solo designs).

    You definitely do not need a planer for the strips. I am assuming you are using a table saw to rip the strips, right? If so, with proper featherboards you should be able to controll the thickness of the strips +/- 1/32" or there abouts. After it's stripped, the hull requires extensive fairing and sanding which will remove any marks left by the rip saw.

    I never made a wood inner stem for my cedar strippers. My stem form was a single thickness of plywood, beveled to a thin edge, so the ends of the strips from each side just about meet at the ends. Once the hull is stripped, I trimmed the strips square at the ends, then wrapped a thin hardwood strip around the stems to cover the ends of the strips. After the hull is glassed (with an extra bias strip over the stems), I turned the canoe over and filled the inside of the stems with a peanut butter thick epoxy. Before the epoxy set, I bent another thin strip of wood inside the stems to cover the epoxy fillet.

    You can't see the top of the epoxy-fillet inner stem in this photo because it's covered by the brass strip, but you can see the thin outer stem.



    In the next photo, notice the batten coming out from under the rear bulkhead; that strip continues up into the stem area and contains the thickened epoxy fillet that forms the inner stem.


    A few more photos <here> but I don't have any good close shots showing the stem details. This "wet-stem" method does not require laminating or gluing up an elaborate stem or cutting bevels.
    That is a very beautiful canoe for sure! Thanks for the tips, i have canoecraft as well and need to give it a more thorough read in the coming days.

    Yes, i am using table saw to rip the strips with featherboards. It should be good with a partner to help.

    I am still debating on how or if i want to do an inner stem but it is good to know that both ways are very possible!

  24. #24
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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    "raises eyebrow"

    Beveled stem making, laminated or steam bent is; elaborate??

    Maybe not for you or me - but it sounded to me like the OP was stressing over Gilpatrick's stem instructions, so I offered an alternative. My epoxy-fillet stem solution also happens to delay the "problem" of dealing with the inner stem from something that must be done before you can get started stripping - to later in the process when the first-time builder has more confidence and a better sense of how the whole project goes together. (Specifically, I would add the epoxy-fillet to the stem area after the canoe has been turned over, and inside glass work is done.)

    A couple of finer points about the epoxy-fillet stem that will need to be considered when the time comes:

    There are a lot of additives which can be added to epoxy to thicken it. Some like cotton fibers, glass fibers, cab-o-sil, and wood flour also add impact strength, while the lightest fillers like hollow glass microshperes and phenolic microballoons may weaken the epoxy.

    Each additive also has it's own color, which usually shows in a small, but highly visible area at the ends of the decks. Phenolic microballoons often have a purplish hue which might not be the best choice, colorwise.

    The nature of the process requires overfilling the stem area, then sanding the fillet flush with the top of the deck. If you get too much glass in the mixture, it can be quite difficult to sand. Best to stick with cotton fibers and or wood flour. The epoxy tends to trap small bubbles which can be seen on close examination of the sanded surface.

    Because of the size of the epoxy fillet, a fairly substantial mass of epoxy is involved. And the wood sides of the space where the epoxy goes is a good insulator - so this is no place to use a fast "hot" resin mix. I've never had any problems due to exothermic heat buildup, but I imagine it could happen under the wrong circumstances.

    I found a photo (but not a good one) demonstrating what the epoxy-fillet stem looks like. Judging by the un-natural color, I probably used some phenolic micro-balloons in this one (it was my first one).



    By-the-way this fillet stem is a variation of the technique used by David Hazen. His book "A Stripper's Guide to Canoe Building" may still be available, tho you may need to look for a used one. That book covers one stripping method which is not usually covered elsewhere. Hazen shows how to make a "football shaped" bottom panel with the strips all running parallel to the keel line. Strip the bottom fast and parallel. Cut the "football" to outline. I used bead and cove strips, so I rounded the edge of the football with coarse sandpaper to match the cove of the strips which then wrap around the football - and stripping continues from the football up to the shear.

    This method avoids the tedious fitting of the final bottom strips which is required when stripping progresses from shear to keel. The trick is to get the shape of the football right. Hazen's instructions are ok if you are building one of his designs, but for other plans, but you may need to do some trial-and-error experiments.

    The photo below shows marking the outline of the football shaped bottom panel. After the panel outline is cut, the next strips will follow the contour.

    Last edited by runswithsizzers; 05-26-2018 at 03:42 AM.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: First Canoe Build: Whtie Guide 18.5 Footer

    I always used the football method. Then again, I learned stripping from the guys at Wilderness boats, a company originally started by Hazen, and I was the farthest eastern dealer for their canoes. Wilderness actually had strongbacks with forms on them just to make bottom football panels. These were then trimmed and transferred to the normal strongback and forms for stripping the sides. They were turning out canoes in about 75 man hours of labor, which were selling at retail in the $600 range, so time was money. Strips were straight edged as nobody had "invented" bead and cove stripping yet. The edges of the football were beveled to meet the first side strip, but that was the only place on the canoe where strips needed to be edge beveled to fit together tightly.

    End construction was stemless and without a fillet. To save weight, they didn't have decks, just short grab handles at the ends. The stem joint was glassed with bias cut strips of cloth inside and out and angled float tanks were installed in the ends. Inwales went all the way to the stem and the two sides were beveled to meet at the tip. The football method probably isn't as attractive to most folks as the other bottom stripping methods, but it's all a matter of what trips your trigger.

    My double kayak had footballs in both the deck and the hull.

    Nanaimo.jpg

    In the case of my big fur trade canoe, it allowed me to strip the football section with thicker strips to help stiffen the bottom a bit more and feather the difference out where they met the side strips using the big disk sander. This one did have big inner stems to help get that end shape.

    Big-Canoe.jpg

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