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Thread: Is it worth doing a 2 year wooden boatbuiling course?

  1. #36

    Default Re: Is it worth doing a 2 year wooden boatbuiling course?

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    The Pacific North West School of Wooden Boat Building in Port Hadlock WA. and The Wooden Boat Foundation in Port Townsend WA offer excellent courses in what you are seeking. They are college accredited schools.
    Jay
    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl
    http://nwmaritime.org/about/history/
    yep
    Boat Designer. Boatbuilder

  2. #37
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Maysville Ky USA
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Is it worth doing a 2 year wooden boatbuiling course?

    Quote Originally Posted by mmd View Post
    Mike, all your points are valid, and I do not seek to convince the hopeful otherwise. My reason for advocating formal training in an educational institute is that, assuming that one selects the correct institution, the student will learn not only the hands-on woodworking and boatbuilding skills, but also will be exposed to the subjects that are rarely available to apprentices or volunteers at restoration projects or small shops, such as lofting, engine installation, marine piping, electrical systems, etc. No, they won't teach you to be a marine electrician or loftsman in a forty-hour course within the curriculum, but you will know the basics so that you are not completely ignorant when the boss asks you to help the journeyman. They will also teach you a smattering of stability, weights & centres, blueprint reading, and maybe even a bit about the business of administering a boatshop. In other words, the student at a recognized boatbuilding school will be exposed to more of the requisite subjects about boatbuilding in two years than they would likely be exposed to in a small shop or restoration project in five years.They will not be as skilled at woodworking as they would in a volunteer or apprentice environment because they would not have had the hands-on time, but they have a broader base of general knowledge about boatbuilding, and that is valuable to the boatyard manager, who needs to know that the junior guy can be teamed with a journeyman in just about any task and be productive there.

    I am pleased to hear that the volunteer path to being a journeyman boatbuilder has worked well for you, and I am sure that your skills are both excellent and hard-won. But I would respectfully submit that yours is not the only path, and that there are advantages and disadvantages to either path to a boatbuilding career.
    I have no disagreement at all MMD. My comments were really not directed at your advise. I certainly agree that the formal program is probably the best route if you can afford it, if not? Well there are other options. It does require a commitment up front in time and money that volunteering does not, which might be a disadvantage if things don't work out. Regardless of the path chosen, it is an ongoing learning process and formal classes are certainly central to that. I like them and take them as often as I am able and I don't mind taking the same subject twice since I learn from repetition and can always come away from a class better then I went in. Employers also like people who seek out professional development education on their own time and expense, it shows that commitment to getting better again. if you are lacking is something like lofting or joinery, go get it. (EDIT) I would also like to add that I work with people on the other end of the spectrum as well. They entered the wooden shipwright world based upon standard carpentry and furniture building experience, but no boat building education or background. They certainly get the job done and can learn as they go, but often their lack of professional nautical language , process, or understanding holds them back, often without their realizing it. They end up pigeon-holed into inglamourous tasks in the yard or become specialists in one specific thing. Most of the guys I see in this case are uninterested in further professional development at their own time and expense and I am convinced that attitude is not lost on management. It applies to riggers too, who become crane specialists because they were industrial riggers first and all that knots/tar/heavers/marlingspike stuff bores and intimidates them. Don't be afraid to be well rounded!

  3. #38
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Maysville Ky USA
    Posts
    6

    Default Re: Is it worth doing a 2 year wooden boatbuiling course?

    Quote Originally Posted by Josh1230 View Post
    This is excellent! ill keep this in mind. Specially the Rigging part in Erie ill be going up there soon to explore so will gander and potter about.

    Yeah, Good luck. I think they do sail training every Saturday over the winter on scale indoor mast with yards. Nice way to learn that if you live nearby. They charge sail trainees big money for the same thing in the Summertime. Do a full read through on their web and Facebook pages before you go.

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