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Thread: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

  1. #1
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    Default Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    I recently made a big that turns my hand held belt sander into a strip sander and can get the wood as thin as veneer. I don't have plans but it should be easy enough for the clever folks here to figure out.

    https://youtu.be/BaozDNHvEns



    If anyone decides to make one I'd love go see it!

    PM

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    looks good.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    I like it and it’s wood butcher style, a must for my build shortlist.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    I made something similar to that to run on the wood lathe.


    drum sander 002 (550x413).jpg

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    Two great ideas! Thanks very much!

    Rick

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    ah... ah choo! ok make em dustless! lol
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    so what are you using the thin strips for?
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    It looks like it does a great job at it's intended purpose but I shudder to think what it would do to your hand if you got just a little too close to the point where the work piece meets the belt. But I guess that's true of most (all?) power cutting tools.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    Quote Originally Posted by Mike V. View Post
    It looks like it does a great job at it's intended purpose but I shudder to think what it would do to your hand if you got just a little too close to the point where the work piece meets the belt. But I guess that's true of most (all?) power cutting tools.
    The sanding belt is driving the work piece toward the operator so it can't grab your personal parts. You can still get a fingernail sanded and its possible to sand a bit of flesh as well if you're careless. If you are tempted to run the work piece from the opposite direction, the sander can take control and grab your hand as well as throw the piece across the shop with dangerous velocity. Shop tools need safe handling procedures and this one is no different.

    My thickness sander is almost identical except that I run the work piece against the flat platen on the 4X24 Makita sander. A lot of veneer and trim pieces have found their way through my sander, including entire interior boat ceiling strips. I suspect Paul's jig needs more attention to a uniform feed speed to get a smooth surface since it works on the small arc of the drum.
    Tom L

  10. #10
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Lathrop View Post
    The sanding belt is driving the work piece toward the operator so it can't grab your personal parts. You can still get a fingernail sanded and its possible to sand a bit of flesh as well if you're careless. If you are tempted to run the work piece from the opposite direction, the sander can take control and grab your hand as well as throw the piece across the shop with dangerous velocity. Shop tools need safe handling procedures and this one is no different.

    My thickness sander is almost identical except that I run the work piece against the flat platen on the 4X24 Makita sander. A lot of veneer and trim pieces have found their way through my sander, including entire interior boat ceiling strips. I suspect Paul's jig needs more attention to a uniform feed speed to get a smooth surface since it works on the small arc of the drum.
    I don't know maybe it's this fear of spinning blades and dangerous cutting equipment that's driving the concept of needing to sand strips. After building five strip boats and cutting hundreds of strips. Planning and sanded, fairing was done after the strips were glued in place and the hull was built. Like why do it twice? Every perfect strip is not going to be perfect when it's on a curved form. Jus sayin

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    I don't know maybe it's this fear of spinning blades and dangerous cutting equipment that's driving the concept of needing to sand strips. After building five strip boats and cutting hundreds of strips. Planning and sanded, fairing was done after the strips were glued in place and the hull was built. Like why do it twice? Every perfect strip is not going to be perfect when it's on a curved form. Jus sayin

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, I think you misunderstand the purpose of these sander jigs. I don't know of anyone who sands strips to build a strip boat. The cut from a decent tablesaw is plenty good for most uses. My sander is for making veneer down to 1/32" or even less with a finish surface. Great for making boat models, Quaker boxes and such. It does not get a lot of use but then, it cost nothing.
    Tom L

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    My strips to build a canoe went through a drum sander. I had great repeatability when I cut the bead and coves and very little sanding before putting the glass on. Over-kill? Maybe, but I was happy with the results.

  13. #13
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Lathrop View Post
    Denise, I think you misunderstand the purpose of these sander jigs. I don't know of anyone who sands strips to build a strip boat. The cut from a decent tablesaw is plenty good for most uses. My sander is for making veneer down to 1/32" or even less with a finish surface. Great for making boat models, Quaker boxes and such. It does not get a lot of use but then, it cost nothing.
    I'm totally in agreement with you Tom. Years ago I even took a tabletop to a shop that had huge sanding & planing equipment.

    And yes they would be worth their weight in gold when doing veneer work!

    But we keep seeing posts about thickness sanding strips....

    I hate sanding dust, but I hate sawdust a little bit less

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    Nicely done. Not what you'd call a production tool, but you've covered all the bases in a solid fashion.

    Cathouse --- Love the lathe version, too. Before I downsized, I had an 24" General dual-drum sander that was similar. I find that I miss it, but not enough to spend the money - and more importantly, dedicate the footprint for such occasional use. But I do have my Jet variable-speed 1236 lathe. It wouldn't take all that much to rig something similar. Next time I have a project that calls for such... I might just rig one up. I'd love to hear more details. If you don't want to hijack this thread, PM me.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Making a strip thickness sanding jig

    Dave pm sent

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