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Thread: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

  1. #1
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    Smile Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Hello,

    Thank you for being here...

    To begin, my Jérôme and I have a dream of getting back on the water and off land as soon as we are able to actualize it. We are close now, relatively speaking. He has been sailing much of his life. I haven't sailed enough to mention, however have decidedly grown up on and in many kinds of water. Well, we are looking into sailboats, large enough for us to live in comfortably, and strong enough for the many kinds of weather we will run into along the way. The ideal size at the moment is 40'. He has his heart set on much older and very well maintained wooden models, i'm focused on what might be the safest to maintain together. At the moment, we are window shopping, toward the end of the year, we'll be traveling to purchase.

    Once we have the boat on the water, we will be looking to get back to work while living on our boat. We are in our late 30's and not at a place where retirement is something we are going to do. Our very loose plan is to work winters in the caribbean and summers on the North east end of the U.S. We actually love the work of our hands and the things we can provide for ourselves from maintaining an active lifestyle. So, we really only need to consider the practicality of where we place our boat, while we maintain our on and off the boat, active lifestyles.

    There is so little on where we could maintain our boats ourselves. Any advice here? Also, we want to anchor, out, and have the option to move to a mooring should inclement weather prove more intense. We are looking into and having a hard time getting even estimated costs for a full season's stay on Lake Montauk. The reason we are looking into Montauk and the Hamptons (then also the Bahamas) are our respective career opportunities. We will want to have our boat near dock during our 4-5 days in and out for work, then we will want the option to be able to wander off for a day, weather permitting, with our boat, into the quiet. So...

    *Where are the best places to do it (repairs, maintenance) ourselves?
    *Anyone know a link to a real person regarding the cost to drop anchor or get into a mooring in Montauk?
    *does anyone know the cost to dock our dingy in the Montauk area?
    *also, best links to ground transportation once on land?
    *we are thinking of a slightly longer sail boat, not the hardest to get in and out of a slip, but advice on docks to avoid?

    I'm sure i'll have even more to ask when we start making moves between two different climates. We are a bit excited and trying not to put the cart before the horse, as it were. While excited we are moving slowly and with caution. Thank you all, for your time, energy and understanding... and for your advice.

    So Warmly,

    Angie & Jérôme

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    There's a place to anchor off the SW corner of Star Island after you enter the harbor. Follow the channel around to starboard. There's room for two or three boats here-and it's close to the town dock where you can come and go with your dink.

    Further in, in the SW corner of Lake Montauk, is a larger anchorage area. The shoreline here is all private and marinas/ motels so you will need to make a dink arrangement or row/sail/ motor the dink to the town dock, which is a bit of a hike--half a mile at least.

    Holding bottom is soupy muck and I wouldn't trust it in a blow--at least, I wouldn't sleep well--and would be inclined to hire a marina slip if the wind is honking. YMMV.

    Once you land your dink, it's a long walk to almost everything, except full service marinas, restaurants, gift shops and charter fishing boats. I'd include a bike--or better yet, an electric bike- to my cruising kit if I planned on going to town. ( or be prepared to call a cab/ Uber/ etc)

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  3. #3
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    I admire your dream and hope you can make it work. I've not been to Montauk or the area since 1966 but, like the Cape area, the growth in boats has been huge and finding mooring space is a huge challenge. I'd spend time cruising the whole south fork up to Riverhead looking for possible places. Sometimes you can find a fish pier or something that might work as well or better than a mooring.

    G'luck

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Thank you!!! Taking heed and direction all around, gentlefolks. Much appreciated chiming in, here.

    A & J

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    oh he wants an electric bike, so badly!!! ok. thank you for the detail here on the holding here.

    A & J

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    You might put your question to Donn Costanzo at www.woodenboatworks.com and ask if he knows people on the Montauk end to contact.
    If I had a dollar for every girl who found me unattractive, eventually they would find me attractive.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    I don't know the area you propose, but around here if you anchor for more than a few weeks, the government starts putting nasty notes on your boat. After 90 days I believe, they impound it. Anchoring out works well if you are cruising, less well if you are trying to hold down a real job. You tend to be viewed as bums by the locals. Which is partly fair, because many who came before you were bums, and filled the anchorage with blue tarps and excrement.

    Its a regrettable thing. You can make it work, but near population centers it is difficult.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    wonderful insight. we were thinking purely from the perspective of staying on our own. but you're right, theres all sorts of people out there. I think J and I both appreciate our freedom and that means we want sometimes to slip, moor and still other times to anchor. Thank you again J. Madison. We simply didn't think of this.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    I lived aboard with my partner and 2 kids for 2 years. 55 foot boat. Papua New Guinea. I think 40 is plenty for a couple. We lived in a marina berth/pen. I think living at anchor or on a mooring and working anything like regular hours would be difficult if not impossible. Unless all your work is online, and you have a great data package, you need your own transport. Electric bikes are great. Good luck.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    There are lots of unused or little used private docks in these popular and pricey waterfront areas. If you could find someone who would let you tie up in exchange for keeping an eye on the place when they weren't home, cutting the grass or whatever the arrangement might be, you'd have your best deal. I did know a guy who kept his boat in the Bahamas at a friend's house in a very well protected canal for years. It worked out well for him -- I don't know if there was a financial side to it, but I believe the home owners did get to go sailing from time to time.
    -Dave

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    I'd like to suggest reading Thomas E. Colvin's,
    Cruising as a Way of Life. If you haven't read it already it could be helpful to you planning your future sailing

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    thanks, adding this to the list. Everyone here has been so helpful.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    THAT is the sort of kindness i've grown accustomed to, where I am living now, and when I was in France on the water there, for a time. Hopeful. thank you.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I lived aboard with my partner and 2 kids for 2 years. 55 foot boat. Papua New Guinea. I think 40 is plenty for a couple. We lived in a marina berth/pen. I think living at anchor or on a mooring and working anything like regular hours would be difficult if not impossible. Unless all your work is online, and you have a great data package, you need your own transport. Electric bikes are great. Good luck.
    So are you saying that it IS possible to live in a marina on a boat, but that it could be hellish to have to dink out and back from a mooring everyday, notwithstanding days with inclement weather?

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Starting in 1981, I have been living aboard and prior to retirement in '03 working. In the winter I was at a dock easy walk to work first in Hyannis and then in Boston. In the summers I was on a mooring in Lewis Bay (working Hyannis, thousand foot row to dink landing) and then Hyannis Harbor (working in Boston so really early morning to bike to bus stop for 0600 commute, about 1/2 nautical mile row). Commuting by dink is easy enough if you have a boat you can row in all weather. But it really takes a higher work ethic to put work cloths in a waterproof case and row through a late spring sleet storm or an autumnal northeaster just to get to work.

    Getting a lifestyle that's efficient and well routinized really helps.

    And while you still need good habits if moored at a dock, it's a quantum leap more convenient, especially if you have evening guests.

    Depending on your work, there's really nothing like a small enclosed lockable utility trailer to keep tools and spares in. This means also a car small enough for convenience but large enough to pull the trailer. And that means a place to stash both, summer near your dink landing or dock, and winter storage for 6 months.

    You might be better off with a couple of folding bikes - I'm partial to the Dahon Mariner as best compromise folded size, rust resistance, cost, practical performance) and the aluminum folding cart pictured below, which handle can be tied to the bottom of the bike seat, landing struts removed, and you have a great around-town carrier. In this application the Dahon has it all over higher performance bikes. You don't need spandex and a helmet to drag this back from the market with a couple hundred pounds of dunnage.

    I also recommend the dink wheels.


  16. #16
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    You cannot work in the Bahamas without a work permit,the penalties are severe. It's impossible to "fly under the radar".

    The same is true to a lesser extent in the Caribbean. There's always the USVI, but living there is not that great.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by angelskeep View Post
    So are you saying that it IS possible to live in a marina on a boat, but that it could be hellish to have to dink out and back from a mooring everyday, notwithstanding days with inclement weather?
    Pretty much. More like living on a boat in a marina is easy and delightful. Living on a mooring or anchor, as Ian describes, doable, but really hard work. Yes could get into the discipline of rowing out and back for work. But what about those days when if you were in a house, or a marina berth, you just need to go get a carton of milk. Or you feel like a walk on the beach. Or you just need 10 minutes away from your partner to avoid saying something best left unsaid. On a berth, no problem. But with a dinghy ride between you and the sure, not so easy. Oh, and you will need 2 dinghies.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    I might say that while up here living on a mooring in winter is a generally bad plan, hense the dock then, I love being on the mooring in the summer and found it worth the inconvenience. My Lewis Bay mooring was mostly and my Hyannis Port mooring was absolutely beyond the annoying bug range. And of course was wholly private. This means that on a hot summer's night - hot humid summer's night as happens in southern New England (of which the south fork is part) - I could sleep naked in a hammock with stars blazing overhead and the possibility of a nice refreshing dew to awaken me. You really cannot beat that.

  19. #19
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by Ian McColgin View Post
    Starting in 1981, I have been living aboard and prior to retirement in '03 working. In the winter I was at a dock easy walk to work first in Hyannis and then in Boston. In the summers I was on a mooring in Lewis Bay (working Hyannis, thousand foot row to dink landing) and then Hyannis Harbor (working in Boston so really early morning to bike to bus stop for 0600 commute, about 1/2 nautical mile row). Commuting by dink is easy enough if you have a boat you can row in all weather. But it really takes a higher work ethic to put work cloths in a waterproof case and row through a late spring sleet storm or an autumnal northeaster just to get to work.

    Getting a lifestyle that's efficient and well routinized really helps.

    And while you still need good habits if moored at a dock, it's a quantum leap more convenient, especially if you have evening guests.

    Depending on your work, there's really nothing like a small enclosed lockable utility trailer to keep tools and spares in. This means also a car small enough for convenience but large enough to pull the trailer. And that means a place to stash both, summer near your dink landing or dock, and winter storage for 6 months.

    You might be better off with a couple of folding bikes - I'm partial to the Dahon Mariner as best compromise folded size, rust resistance, cost, practical performance) and the aluminum folding cart pictured below, which handle can be tied to the bottom of the bike seat, landing struts removed, and you have a great around-town carrier. In this application the Dahon has it all over higher performance bikes. You don't need spandex and a helmet to drag this back from the market with a couple hundred pounds of dunnage.

    I also recommend the dink wheels.

    Such practical advice. Most appreciated.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by Hwyl View Post
    You cannot work in the Bahamas without a work permit,the penalties are severe. It's impossible to "fly under the radar".

    The same is true to a lesser extent in the Caribbean. There's always the USVI, but living there is not that great.
    J & I, We are hoping only to find our freedom and best live out the rest of our american dream and not at all "get away with anything". Living and working as we please, saving for retirement, along the way. We are looking into the visa's necessary to work down there, now, as well as networking our business connections. In the interim, our understanding is that now is not the time for people from the US to go in and take jobs from people local to the area. The hurricane damage was so significant that it seems important to allow that economy to come to its own strength again. The two locations we are looking at are still loose, but gives us a direction to begin to narrow down the truth of the areas, the culture of the areas, whats needed and expected of us, respectfully. Which is what makes this forum, so great. Again, everyone here has been so incredibly helpful. Thank you!

  21. #21
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    Smile contacts in Sag Harbor

    We are also looking at contacts for business off Sag Harbor. Wondering if there is a best to reach contact for port/anchoring/slip/mooring/harbor culture questions in that area as well. Any connections from any of you lovely people?

  22. #22
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Sag Harbor is rather upscale (wealthy). It is an incorporated village, with a website. You might find information there about village regulations, or those of the surrounding township.
    I live farther west on Long Island, and cruise a 39' sailboat. If you come to LI, send me a message, perhaps we can meet. Long Island is large, with many harbors and towns. Good luck, keep us posted.
    Last edited by johngsandusky; 01-13-2018 at 10:50 AM.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by johngsandusky View Post
    Sag Harbor is rather upscale (wealthy). It is an incorporated village, with a website. You might find information there about village regulations, or those of the surrounding township.
    I live farther west on Long Island, and cruise a 39' sailboat. If you come to LI, send me a message, perhaps we can meet. Long Island is large, with many harbors and towns. ood luck, keep us posted.
    It will likely depend on the whole package of work and docking. We want to contribute or be a part of where we are, as much as we value our privacy and crabshell home life. There are so many details we are ironing out at the moment. I will go an check the web page. Thank you!!!

  24. #24

    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    I grew up out there, been gone for 30 plus years and visit infrequently. Last time there it seemed that Sag Harbor is now the land of
    mega yachts, probable too busy but you can check. Perhaps Three Mile Harbor in East Hampton or Shelter Island which has 3 decent harbors, or even the North Fork. Greenport has good dockspace with possible anchorage/mooring space in Orient. Southold and Mattituck could work.

    That is such a great area for sailing. Day trips to everywhere, Block Island, Newport, Martha's Vineyard etc. Back when I was there you could tie up most anywhere and throw an anchor over for weeks at a time. It is very different now but still nice.

    Best of luck to you.

  25. #25
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by Frost View Post
    I grew up out there, been gone for 30 plus years and visit infrequently. Last time there it seemed that Sag Harbor is now the land of
    mega yachts, probable too busy but you can check. Perhaps Three Mile Harbor in East Hampton or Shelter Island which has 3 decent harbors, or even the North Fork. Greenport has good dockspace with possible anchorage/mooring space in Orient. Southold and Mattituck could work.

    That is such a great area for sailing. Day trips to everywhere, Block Island, Newport, Martha's Vineyard etc. Back when I was there you could tie up most anywhere and throw an anchor over for weeks at a time. It is very different now but still nice.

    Best of luck to you.
    Thank you Frost. You are the second to suggest Shelter Island today, heard the waters in storms are relatively calm. Lovely to hear its a sailing place to be. Times always change, and rolling with the changes is something I believe we are willing to do. We are friendly as well as hard working... I have hope in our dream coming to fruition. Thank you so much for the well wishing.

  26. #26
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    I lived aboard with my partner and 2 kids for 2 years. 55 foot boat. Papua New Guinea. I think 40 is plenty for a couple. We lived in a marina berth/pen. I think living at anchor or on a mooring and working anything like regular hours would be difficult if not impossible. Unless all your work is online, and you have a great data package, you need your own transport. Electric bikes are great. Good luck.
    Forgive the ignorance Phil Y, what were the conditions of the Berth/pen vs a marina, or are the terms interchangable?

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Pretty much. More like living on a boat in a marina is easy and delightful. Living on a mooring or anchor, as Ian describes, doable, but really hard work. Yes could get into the discipline of rowing out and back for work. But what about those days when if you were in a house, or a marina berth, you just need to go get a carton of milk. Or you feel like a walk on the beach. Or you just need 10 minutes away from your partner to avoid saying something best left unsaid. On a berth, no problem. But with a dinghy ride between you and the sure, not so easy. Oh, and you will need 2 dinghies.
    SOUND! advice... i am a firm believer in space as the saving grace of a partnership. we are both relatively active at the moment at altitude in the mountains... i can easily see us having discipline on work days, rain, wind or calm to get to and back to work... but what about the stillness that brings peace to love? you're absolutely right. Thank you again, Phil Y. grateful for the experienced wisdom. If you care to share, what were you up to in New Guinea?

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by angelskeep View Post
    Forgive the ignorance Phil Y, what were the conditions of the Berth/pen vs a marina, or are the terms interchangable?
    I think the terms are interchangeable. Just trying to cover every version of our shared language.

  29. #29
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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    Quote Originally Posted by angelskeep View Post
    SOUND! advice... i am a firm believer in space as the saving grace of a partnership. we are both relatively active at the moment at altitude in the mountains... i can easily see us having discipline on work days, rain, wind or calm to get to and back to work... but what about the stillness that brings peace to love? you're absolutely right. Thank you again, Phil Y. grateful for the experienced wisdom. If you care to share, what were you up to in New Guinea?
    I was working as a lawyer for an Australian based firm, in their Port Moresby office. So a decently respectable job. You don't have to be a hobo to live on a boat.

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    Default Re: Purchasing, Anchoring, full-season port living, Montauk?/Bahamas

    When I lived on a mooring with a partner, we had two tenders. This necessity was brought home our first summer. We were on a mooring in West Bay, Osterville, less than 240' from the dink landing. I had a late meeting so Gayle went back to the boat and I was to simply call to her when I got back. We tested and voices carried easily. So I bicycled back, called out, and . . . nothing. Gayle was a sound sleeper. Eventually I stripped and swam out. As I started up the boarding ladder (always leave the ladder down when on a mooring) my cats took to the rail hissing and scratching at me until I was out of the water enough that they recognized me. Anyway, the next day I began securing a second tender.

    You must also be prepared for the unexpected guest. One Saturday in Lewis Bay it was blowing a stink. Getting to our landing would be easy but getting back was hard to impossible so we were hanging out doing what a couple might do on a sleepy stormy Saturday when I heard a call, "Ian!! HELP!"

    So I roared topside, all standing as it were. My heaving line was always handy I managed to pass it to my friend in a passing dink before he blew down to Yarmouth. As I hauled him in, his remark was, "So . . . you're really glad to see me."

    He'd really wanted to visit but could not row against the wind. He waded the dink south along the beach, past the Hyannis Yacht Club and over to the edge of Kalmus, setting from there downwind to us. With determination like that, how could we possibly refuse hospitality despite the most importune interruption?

    Life on a boat. Be prepared for anything, anytime.

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