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Thread: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Will someone be able to drive the pins out to replace bearings in 100 years if they need it?
    I'm thinking that the axles will be drilled through and through and made removable for assembly and maintenance.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  2. #72
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    They should be VERY discrete in the finished product, eh?

    Peace,
    Robert

    That would be the ideal, Rob, understated like you wouldn't believe..




    Quote Originally Posted by Sailor View Post
    Will someone be able to drive the pins out to replace bearings in 100 years if they need it?

    Dan, that would depend more on who's doing the driving than anything else. Probably not is my guess.

    This is how I'd do it. First, drill a small hole through the center of the pin, enlarge the hole with successively larger drill bits, making sure not to nick the shell. Give the block a good soaking in WD-40 and try an EZ-Out and light taps with a hammer and punch.


    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    I'm thinking that the axles will be drilled through and through and made removable for assembly and maintenance.
    The axle will be captured, Nick.

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    Dan, that would depend more on who's doing the driving than anything else. Probably not is my guess.

    This is how I'd do it. First, drill a small hole through the center of the pin, enlarge the hole with successively larger drill bits, making sure not to nick the shell. Give the block a good soaking in WD-40 and try an EZ-Out and light taps with a hammer and punch.




    The axle will be captured, Nick.
    So you are not planning to strip down, clean and repack the bearings? Just dropping them in a bucket of oil to soak?
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  4. #74
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Ledger View Post
    That would be the ideal, Rob, understated like you wouldn't believe..







    Dan, that would depend more on who's doing the driving than anything else. Probably not is my guess.

    This is how I'd do it. First, drill a small hole through the center of the pin, enlarge the hole with successively larger drill bits, making sure not to nick the shell. Give the block a good soaking in WD-40 and try an EZ-Out and light taps with a hammer and punch.




    The axle will be captured, Nick.
    Yeah. I was imaging the pins on my little pocket folder. I know there are pins in there, and I th8nkmthey are in this one spot, but I am not 100% sure.

    I canít wait to see them.

    Peace,
    Robert

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    So you are not planning to strip down, clean and repack the bearings? Just dropping them in a bucket of oil to soak?

    Unlike wood shelled blocks there's plenty of room in these blocks between the shell and sheave. Should I wish to pack the bearings with grease in the old-fashioned way it could be easily accomplished using a palette knife to force the grease into the bearings from one side while removing whatever old grease squeezes out the from other side. Being all metal, there's also the option of throwing the entire block into a bucket of lacquer thinner to clean out any crud, or use a parts cleaner.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    What sort of bearings are you planning on?

    Jeff

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    What sort of bearings are you planning on?

    Jeff
    Hi, Jeff, I'll be using a set of roller bearing sheaves that I made a few years back, turning on stainless steel axles. Here's a link to the thread where all is explained...

    http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...ave&highlight=


  8. #78
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Looking lovely... Great to see you back at play. Subscribing for updates. Thanks as always Jim!
    My Goat Island Skiff Project Photos:
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/999065...7648295059621/

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianMCarney View Post
    Looking lovely... Great to see you back at play. Subscribing for updates. Thanks as always Jim!
    Updates imminent, Brian. The welder is back on line, the lift-out tongs for the smaller crucible are nearing completion, four new, smaller flasks made to better fit the project, the new pyrometer's ready.

    Jim

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    I'm gearing up to be able to do smaller melts to cast smaller pieces, like these block shells.

    I was using the crucible on the right exclusively. It can hold thirty pounds...theoretically, if you care to pick up such a brimming teacup. The disadvantage of the large crucible is that you need to pick it up with lift-out tongs and then set it into a pouring shank for the pour. Lotsa moves there, and all the while the metal is cooling off.

    For smaller pours, using the crucible on the left, the two functions of lifting and pouring can be done with one tool. This is quicker to do and safer as there's less handling of the crucible.

    For this purpose I made the set of tongs in the foreground. I can pick up the crucible, pivot a quarter turn and pour and return the crucible to the furnace with very few motions. This will result in a quicker, more controlled pour.

    The design for the tongs is unusual. It was taken from the internet and modified to use what was laying around the shop.



  11. #81
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    http://www.wish.com/search/crucible#...bff56308a58176

    I saw these online and thought they may be of some use to those of you who do casting. The site has several different types available.
    There is nothing quite as permanent as a good temporary repair.

  12. #82
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    Erin, ON, CANADA
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    As I mentioned over on the Catboat thread I have done a couple castings last fall with mixed results. I made a small bucket furnace that was more designed with melting aluminum with charcoal in mind. I thought if I upgraded the liner to refractory cement and use coal instead of charcoal to get the temps up a bit more it might be good enough for Bronze. Well even after I got rid of the hairdryer as bellows and upgraded with my real bellows from my smithy I still couldn't keep the temps up long enough to have the bronze hot enough to pour. I could melt it but I would run out of fuel and had to open up the furnace to reload more coal, and that would drop the temp, and bellow the temp up and sweat and repeat... LOL. Here's a short clip showing the original setup with the hairdryer.


  13. #83
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    Two hours later I moved to this...



    And after a couple more hours of sweating this was the result.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    So I found a design online for a propane burner for this kind of furnaces and made one up.

    furnace burner.jpg

    This was the ticket! It had my small crucible of bronze melted in 25-30 minutes from cold and I didn't sweat a drop doing it! LOL


  15. #85
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    The great thing about casting bronze is you can remelt your failures!

    recycling.jpg

    This is the two piece model of my torpedo cleat. I saw something similar in an old ebay auction and decided I could make something a little nicer and this is what I came up with. You'll notice how it changed as I carved it out of wood from the drawing I originally sketched up.

    idea.jpg
    C-model.jpg
    c-model1.jpg

    I also carved out recesses so I can cast in bronze bolt into the casting as seen here after the model has been removed from the one mold half.

    C-model mold.jpg

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Casting thin shell bronze blocks

    And finally the result of my second attempt....

    sucess2.jpg
    sucess.jpg
    prepolish.jpg

    I was pleased with these results but there are some bad sand inclusions in this one because I wasn't careful enough with keeping my pouring channels clean of loose sand. So I will use this one to practice polishing and I will cast another one in the spring. I've learned a lot in these two castings and I know I have a lot more to learn.

    I don't mean to hijack your thread Jim but I thought I'd share. I made my green sand with playsand and kitty litter. It works well but could be finer. I noticed your sand was really fine Jim. Is that premade commercial sand or did you make it yourself? It's also very dark, is it oil based?
    Last edited by wainair; 02-17-2018 at 10:55 AM.

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