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Thread: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    Thing is, it's not much fun at all rowing in big water, it's a constant struggle. Who needs or even enjoys that?

  2. #37
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Thing is, it's not much fun at all rowing in big water, it's a constant struggle. Who needs or even enjoys that?
    Some people do. I donít get it, but I donít get most people.

    We, on the other hand, have no shortage of large, placid water to row upon. We could have a lot of fun of with a nice, double banked row boat around here, I think.

  3. #38
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    May 2015
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    145

    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    "plus fishing lines and a harpoon" Ditch the harpoon...but fishing for rockfish (sebastes complex rockfish) @ the Farallons is as close to a sure thing as it gets out of SF.

    Chesapeake Light Craft's Faering cruiser is worth a close study - but for three & rowing not ideal...The return trip is generally more downwind than a reach & it's hard not to get the warm fuzzies thinking of watching the wind do the work for you...

    I'd do a close study of CLC's "Team Dory" as it can 1- sleep three (bivy sack accustomed climbers hopefully...) 2 - easily modified to make it self bailing 3- it's a kit, the main benefit being a "short" build time and if you have friends to help it's much easier to plug them into CLC's excellent instruction book & get real help from unskilled hands. To adapt it for sail look at how the Swampscott dorys manage it.

    If you want to build from scratch rgthorn's St Ayles skiff is promising as are many other traditional rowing skiff types (whitehalls were the main American approach) which all share the general proportions of length/beam/displacement. Many of these carried sail - none are good all-around sailboats but having fooled around with downwind sails on kayaks these types can be safely sailed if you don't ask for much (any?) up wind ability. Great idea...good luck

  4. #39
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    Walney, near Cumbria UK
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by MoePorter View Post
    "plus fishing lines and a harpoon" Ditch the harpoon...but fishing for rockfish (sebastes complex rockfish) @ the Farallons is as close to a sure thing as it gets out of SF.

    Chesapeake Light Craft's Faering cruiser is worth a close study - but for three & rowing not ideal...The return trip is generally more downwind than a reach & it's hard not to get the warm fuzzies thinking of watching the wind do the work for you...

    I'd do a close study of CLC's "Team Dory" as it can 1- sleep three (bivy sack accustomed climbers hopefully...) 2 - easily modified to make it self bailing 3- it's a kit, the main benefit being a "short" build time and if you have friends to help it's much easier to plug them into CLC's excellent instruction book & get real help from unskilled hands. To adapt it for sail look at how the Swampscott dorys manage it.

    If you want to build from scratch rgthorn's St Ayles skiff is promising as are many other traditional rowing skiff types (whitehalls were the main American approach) which all share the general proportions of length/beam/displacement. Many of these carried sail - none are good all-around sailboats but having fooled around with downwind sails on kayaks these types can be safely sailed if you don't ask for much (any?) up wind ability. Great idea...good luck
    St Ayles skiffs are a sailing form, with a dipping lugsail (called square sail by the Shetlanders) set in a mast amidships. Would need some ballast though. Kit and some big water containers would do it.
    Not a St Aylkes Skiff, but the same family of craft
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #40
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    Apr 2010
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    Fairfield, CA
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    Thing is, it's not much fun at all rowing in big water, it's a constant struggle. Who needs or even enjoys that?
    I hear you! Even without wind it's a lot of the same thing. Much more fun to poke along the shore or up an estuary, something new at every turn. You can still set yourself a 30 mile goal, and you won't die if you don't make it!

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay


  7. #42
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    Jan 2009
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    northwestern Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by MoePorter View Post
    If you want to build from scratch rgthorn's St Ayles skiff is promising as are many other traditional rowing skiff types (whitehalls were the main American approach) which all share the general proportions of length/beam/displacement. Many of these carried sail - none are good all-around sailboats but having fooled around with downwind sails on kayaks these types can be safely sailed if you don't ask for much (any?) up wind ability.
    You may be overstating the lack of windward ability to whitehall-type boats. My Alaska does just fine to windward with a standing lug--not that it's the ideal boat for this trip, as it's not big enough for three crew. It certainly rows well enough to handle a trip of this kind:

    Christmas letter photo.jpg

    But a boat like this is more than adequate to windward. It's certainly not a downwind-only cruiser.

    Tom
    You don't have to be prepared as long as you're willing to suffer the consequences.

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  8. #43
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    I would be pretty happy with this choice. I even took her for a spin back in '75, she rows nicely.


  9. #44
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    "You may be overstating the lack of windward ability to whitehall-type boats" You're right, I stand corrected.
    I had a Newfoundland sealing skiff 17x 4'9" from Chappell's book with a centerboard - fine sailer & decent to windward - very much like a whitehall - but rowing it was a chore. It's still a balance of easier to row (narrow beam) vs. more stability (wider beam) for sail. I should have said you'll have an easier to row boat if you don't ask for the stability needed to sail to windward.
    Windward here, in & out of SF bay usually means 15+ kts of wind & short steep chop so it seems a reasonable compromise to have an easily driven (narrow) hull you can row straight into the wind and save the sail for reaching & downwind. In the bay, non-planing sailing boats with short waterlines tend to hobby horse up & down without making much good to windward in typical conditions.
    The best resource for rowing the bay must be the South End Rowing Club - they have on the bay rowing clinics & a collection of traditional pulling boats used daily on the bay.
    Moe
    http://serc.com/Rowing_Clinic.html

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Tandem rowing boat to Farallon Is. from SF Bay

    Quote Originally Posted by MoePorter View Post
    "You may be overstating the lack of windward ability to whitehall-type boats" You're right, I stand corrected.
    I had a Newfoundland sealing skiff 17x 4'9" from Chappell's book with a centerboard - fine sailer & decent to windward - very much like a whitehall - but rowing it was a chore. It's still a balance of easier to row (narrow beam) vs. more stability (wider beam) for sail. I should have said you'll have an easier to row boat if you don't ask for the stability needed to sail to windward.
    Windward here, in & out of SF bay usually means 15+ kts of wind & short steep chop so it seems a reasonable compromise to have an easily driven (narrow) hull you can row straight into the wind and save the sail for reaching & downwind. In the bay, non-planing sailing boats with short waterlines tend to hobby horse up & down without making much good to windward in typical conditions.
    The best resource for rowing the bay must be the South End Rowing Club - they have on the bay rowing clinics & a collection of traditional pulling boats used daily on the bay.
    Moe
    http://serc.com/Rowing_Clinic.html
    Water ballast will help here.
    Pump it ob when rowing and fill a double bottom for sailing. A sharp rise of floor will reduce beam for rowing when light but pick up beam when ballasted down.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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