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Thread: Herreshoff dinghy

  1. #1
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    Default Herreshoff dinghy

    I was wondering has any one out there build the Herreshoff dinghy via the booklet ? Iíve built a clinker dinghy before however after reading the book there are a few un knowns about the meathod they used. Iím not sure if any thing is to be gained in steaming the ribs over the molds in the first place.

    I tried contacting the mystic museum with no luck so Iíd be interested to hear others view point if they have built this boat.

    many thanks Michael

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    I think that steaming the ribs over the moulds was common Herreshoff practice for their big yachts as well. Will only work with screwing the plank to the timbers.
    I too can't see the point with clinker work as it requires so much wasted effort and wood for all of the moulds in a one off. OK for a factory series build churning out dozens.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  3. #3
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    I've built three. They built hundreds in many sizes.

  4. #4
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Herreshoff Mfg. Co. was into production and also accurate reflection of Nat's designs. The dinghies were almost the only boats they built lapstrake. The upside down construction techniques used, with frames bent to molds, was standard in the Herreshoff shop. The larger boats were all screw fastened and carvel. The dinghies were built to every other frame, planks pinned to the frame on the mold with laps riveted between the molds, space left for an additional timber to be bent in after removal from the mold when the pins would be replaced by rivets so all frames were riveted to the planks. Using the half model carved for Columbia, Herresmhoff's built boats from 9' to 21' at least, expanding all dimensions, but also by adjusting spacing between molds, sometimes also adjusting sheer height. All the variations were made to address different needs, mostly as tenders for larger vessels. The molds were produced in the mold shop to the dimensions given by Nat based on his measurements taken from the model. His measuring machine gave measurements to whatever proportion he desired, the models carved in pine.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    The Apprenticeshop built one of those Herreshoff dinghies as soon as Barry Thomas's book came out back in what, the seventies? I was there but didn't have much to do with the project. All I remember is that it was a delicate boat, at least compared to what they were used to building, they didn't use as many molds as the original method did and the hull came out fine. The sailing rig wasn't great however with the mast way up in the eyes of the boat and the boom cocked very high. When sailing downwind the boom cocked even higher, drove the bow down and made for dicey steering.
    "It's a pirate's life for me. Savvy??"

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    I have found the sailing rig excellent, built as designed.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    It has always been my understanding that the "Herreshoff method" of bending light frames over molds and planking on a building frame was devised in order to permit production of large numbers of their dinghies efficiently. That efficiency was only realized, however, when the time and effort of building the construction frame was amortized when it was used to build a number of dinghies. Were one building "one off," the less tedious approach would be to build in the customary fashion. I suspect, however, that the "Herreshoff method" also permitted the construction of a lighter dinghy than other options.

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    I am wondering if you are speaking of Nathanial or L.Francis Herreshoff's designs?
    Jay

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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Quote Originally Posted by Thad View Post
    Herreshoff Mfg. Co. was into production and also accurate reflection of Nat's designs. The dinghies were almost the only boats they built lapstrake. The upside down construction techniques used, with frames bent to molds, was standard in the Herreshoff shop. The larger boats were all screw fastened and carvel. The dinghies were built to every other frame, planks pinned to the frame on the mold with laps riveted between the molds, space left for an additional timber to be bent in after removal from the mold when the pins would be replaced by rivets so all frames were riveted to the planks. Using the half model carved for Columbia, Herresmhoff's built boats from 9' to 21' at least, expanding all dimensions, but also by adjusting spacing between molds, sometimes also adjusting sheer height. All the variations were made to address different needs, mostly as tenders for larger vessels. The molds were produced in the mold shop to the dimensions given by Nat based on his measurements taken from the model. His measuring machine gave measurements to whatever proportion he desired, the models carved in pine.
    I defiantly need to read up on him a bit more as 8 know he is one of the iconic builders / designers of days gone by.

    Thanks for your input

  10. #10
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    I’m not sure, I’m talking about the booker written by Barry Thomas

  11. #11
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Hmmmm...... I’m not such an advanced sailor to know. I take it the boat was design by Herreshoff to sail as well as it rowed or was that sailing option a secondary kinda thing ?

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    The NGH Columbia tender models differed in length (as mentioned) and many other ways: scantlings, sailing option, interior details and some even had fore and aft decks with flotation tanks built in. As Thad said, in capable hands they sailed well.
    "It's a pirate's life for me. Savvy??"

  13. #13
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Building a mold for a small boat is VERY time and material expensive.. Took me 2-3 years to develop and build a form for what was to be "our" design but things change, and we only built one.. I gave the form away to Phila boat factory (they teach boat building to inner city kids)

    I had the book for building the H dink and why I didn't build it.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  14. #14
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    I am wondering if you are speaking of Nathanial or L.Francis Herreshoff's designs?
    Jay
    The "Herreshoff dinghy" the OP is talking about is NGH's "Columbia Lifeboat" or "Columbia tender" model which is written up in detail in a book the WBStore has. "Building the Columbia Lifeboat" or something like that. It's a great read because the author tracked down one of the original HMCo "mechanics" who built these stock dinghies and he took an oral history from him on exactly how they built them.

  15. #15
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    20 or so years ago I wanted to build that boat in glued clinker plywood and started lofting the body plan. One station did not look wright and I could not find a mistake in my work so I conclude the mistake was in the offsets and gave up. But it is quite possible I was repeating a mistake of my own. I still think it would be a very nice boat with thin plywood strakes. 4 mm should work.
    Is there anyone, expect Barry Thomas ofcourse, who built this boat?

  16. #16
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Quote Originally Posted by FF View Post
    20 or so years ago I wanted to build that boat in glued clinker plywood and started lofting the body plan. One station did not look wright and I could not find a mistake in my work so I conclude the mistake was in the offsets and gave up. But it is quite possible I was repeating a mistake of my own. I still think it would be a very nice boat with thin plywood strakes. 4 mm should work.
    Is there anyone, expect Barry Thomas ofcourse, who built this boat?
    Many have been built. It's a quite popular design. https://www.google.com/search?q=herr...w=1680&bih=900

    Some are even produced commercially on a production basis: http://www.artisanboatworks.com/clas...olumbia-dinghy

  17. #17
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    Thanks Bob, nice website of Artisanbotworks.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Herreshoff dinghy

    I don't think Artisan has built them on a production basis... although I imagine they'd be happy to! Taylor and Snediker have built several spectacular ones in different sizes: http://snedikeryacht.com/gallery-2/
    "It's a pirate's life for me. Savvy??"

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