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Thread: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

  1. #36
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by jackster View Post
    Sorry, Garret, I didn't explain very well. If retro-ing the wire chase, ie. SIPS in place outside the structure, you will be interrupted at every post/beam. Code is to have wires in the middle of the frame, as I'm sure you know, so they are less likely to be pierced. In the experience I have with SIPS, they were 11 1/4" thick. But those were roof units with no chases.
    I guess this is getting a bit far afield from BrianM's OP, for which I apologize.
    We are getting a bit OT... If the SIPs are already installed, making new chases inside them is more difficult. Vertical can be done with a hot ball drooped down (there's a goofy video in the link above) - horizontal will be more problematic.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  2. #37
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    OP lost interest?
    Running wire in sip is like running wire in existing construction. Die Hard new construction experience people will probably not like working on S I Ps so chose ur electrical people wisely


    http://www.siphomesystems.com/sip_st...els_pg110.html

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  3. #38
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    It's a shop, right? Run the wiring in conduit higher on the wall than the tops of the work benches. Easy to access, easy to modify. Use the larger boxes and put in 2 duplex receptacles in each, and put in more of them than you think you'll need.

  4. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gib Etheridge View Post
    It's a shop, right? Run the wiring in conduit higher on the wall than the tops of the work benches. Easy to access, easy to modify. Use the larger boxes and put in 2 duplex receptacles in each, and put in more of them than you think you'll need.
    Reminds me of the time when my guys were running conduit down from the roof mounted air conditioning units in a steel building, they were using powder actuated steel fasteners into steel beams. The twang through the steel with so loud every employee in the building stopped whatever they were working on to see what it was! I got scolded and warned to make sure everybody knew before we used the gun again!

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

  5. #40
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    OP lost interest?
    Running wire in sip is like running wire in existing construction. Die Hard new construction experience people will probably not like working on S I Ps so chose ur electrical people wisely


    http://www.siphomesystems.com/sip_st...els_pg110.html

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    My electrician had little trouble working with my sip's. the brand I used had horizontal and vertical chases installed. Custom chases were a little harder but not bad. I did several myself.
    Tom

  6. #41
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    What do you have growing near you? Local guys with small mills can make nice timber for cheap. If there are any Doug Firs around that is the way to go.

    Post and beam kit? Is the kit just a pile of beams? You can do that at the local mill. Stick built is cheaper and faster, but I get it. Real wood just makes you feel better. That's the whole point anyway. Good luck!

  7. #42
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by jackster View Post
    Steven, I'd be interested to know if, for $70-75/ sq ft, that included wiring, plumping and heat. How the heat was distributed.
    And how those systems fit in a SIPS system.
    That is Shelter Institute’s price for their simplest design. It doesn’t include the foundation. It doesn’t include wiring plumbing or heat. I don’t think that price even includes windows. With the SIPS you don’t need much heat. Wiring can be handled different ways. On one job we spaced the baseboard trim out an inch from the wall and ran the wires behind the baseboard.
    If you are good with your hands you could take Shelter’s one week Post and Beam Class and buy a bunch of roughsawn 8x8s and 8x12s and learn all you need to cut your own frame. The one I built was 20’x30’ upstairs and 20’x40’ downstairs. I cut all the posts and beams to length with a Japanese style handsaw, and made all the mortises and tenons with hand tools. It was a fun project.

  8. #43
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Hi All, I was laid out last week with Chest Cold so I took it easy. It's going to take me awhile to process all the replies.


    But progress was made in the RFQ process. I found a guy who would hit my budget and desired footprint (44'x40') in Doug Fir timbers.


    I still want to understand Borate and other non-toxic-to-me-and-animals preservative treatments. I will definitely paint regardless inside and out.




    On Why timber framing (for ahp).


    I just put the last bucket load of ash (120 yards of ash and debris) into a series of 40 yard dumpsters. Guess what chunks of structure still had their integrity after about 45 minutes of inferno????


    Not the two roof supporting 25' long 12" x 6" I-beams of 1/2" thickness... not the 2"x6" stud walls.. but ring ring ring ring.. the 8" x 8" wooden timbers. Slightly charred but otherwise PERFECTLY sound.


    POLE BARNS


    The cost of materials for a Pole Barn version of this structure is half to 1/3 of the Post and Beam. My Claim Check from my Insurance happens to cover the Post and Beam materials costs for a kit and the other associated materials and expenses.. so I have a choice. There's a long list of pros and cons of pole barn vs post and beam. My list came down to how much time and money it would take to re use the existing footings. Pole barns are meant to go up quick and cheap at the cost of a short life. The "quick and cheap" is because you bury the post in either soil, gravel, or concrete, all of which are in a hole you auger into the ground.. However, I have pure clay soil. No treated fence post in my pure clay soil lasts more than 10 years. Period. The barns main supports are essentially giant fence posts. I would have to cut my foundation and dig holes to erect a pole barn.


    STICK BUILT


    I first contacted local contractors for a stick built replacement (4 of them).
    I sent plan and elevations drawings to each of these guys drawn up by an Architect we know.



    One is a barn builder specifically. His going rate was $50/square foot before the Sonoma and Napa county fires. He since told me he has jacked his rate up but has not submitted a bid, nor revealed what that secret new rate is.
    Next contractor said he has the time, but subs aren't responding.. so still no bid after 5 weeks of asking
    3rd Contractor only does houses, essentially told me to go jump in a lake by bidding $250-400 square foot (this is an agricultural building).
    4th Contractor is non responsive also and this is after meeting face to face twice.

    Over 5000 structures were lost in the Sonoma/Napa County fires in October. Dump Truckers from all over the west are camping out in Home Depot and Lowes parking lots working crazy long shifts moving and dumping ash and debris from the lost homes of over 25,000 people. Put that together with property values that were already out of control and you may understand why getting local labor for ANYTHING will not be an option for anyone but the 1%'rs for easily the next 4 years.



    POST AND BEAM


    Post and Beam allows me to mount to the surface of my existing poured footings (assuming I pass the approval to reuse, and it hits the minimums in strength the Structural Engineer calculates out). If not, the Kit suppliers have the flexibility to design mods to my foundation. It may turn out I need to pour only a couple or four new piers.. which is a fraction of the number of holes I'd need to do for Pole Barns.
    Structural Integrity during fire is as mentioned above.
    Ease of expansion is awesome as all walls are non structural, so I can start small and bump out in the future.
    Asset for my property value.

  9. #44
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Plus, looks great!

  10. #45
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by StevenBauer View Post
    Plus, looks great!
    Indeed it does. Additionally, it supports craftsmen. Also - there's a lot to be said for working/living in a structure you enjoy.

    I find the beam condition fascinating & it'd make me lean towards P&B even if I weren't pre-disposed.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  11. #46
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by Canoeyawl View Post
    My experience with Hemlock here in Central Ca. is that it will be termite riddled in 30 years. I'm old enough now to have to go back and replace work that I did 30-35 years ago. The stuff I have taken down recently including the shear ply is just riddled and ruined.
    Much of the work I did were additions to my existing Redwood or old growth DF buildings and the bugs just stopped when they came up against those. (They went a little ways into the Fir but were obviously discouraged excepting where it may have been wet.)
    I've seen enough mold stained Hemlock at the lumber yard still strapped in a unit to dis trust it. Fortunately, I can use Fir.

  12. #47
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Speaking from a perspective of pure ignorance, is there great advantage in going with a kit? Can you just get some lumber and whatever tools you need to make the joints yourself?
    I'm picking my poison Phil. Yes, I can buy the timbers and then all the tools to cut mortise and tenon joints. My story is this building is replacing my barn which burnt down in May. ALL my tools were taken with it. I have been buying items to replace them the needs arise to do "critical" projects on the property (been fence building since July). I have been reduced literally from a lifetimes accumulation of inherited and purchased wood shop and machine shops to a solitary hammer. The hammer had been stolen by my wife and held hostage at her Yoga studio, otherwise I would not even have had it!

    This kit has everything cut to size and an Engineered set of drawings. I have to meet California's seismic and structural requirements in spite of my Agricultural zoning only because I don't meet the minimum acreage to be EXEMPT from the permitting/inspection process. The good news is that Post and Beam are generally OVERBUILT and it's not tough to keep them standing when the ground moves.

    The speed with which these goes together means I can get a group of friends and relatives together over a weekend to erect the "bents", then roof and side it at my leisure. With the firestorm we had here back in October, hired labor is not an option as the pricing and availability have become ridiculous.

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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by JimConlin View Post
    I'd also evaluate conventional stud wall construction. You might find builders more competitive.
    I had quotes from General Contractors for conventional first (old barn was this style). I can't afford their labor at 10x materials.. not for an agricultural building.

    I could rebuild myself using stick construction and have NOT priced that out because I'd need my Architect to detail the design. We are trying to re use the existing foundation which prevents my using stock plans. The Architect has been pretty pricey just to get concepts on paper with an elevation and plan view to show for $2K. Detailed drawings + engineering are not an attractive prospect at this point, especially when the kit builders do that for you.

  14. #49
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by Watergoat View Post
    I see you are on the left coast. Can you guys get pressure treated lumber? Here in NC, that's all anybody uses for framing ag buildings, pole barns, etc, as well as decks and any sort of outdoor construction. Lowes and HD carry a pretty good line, and the real lumber yards have an even bigger selection of sizes. And if I go down to the coast, the lumber yards have some huge stuff, for docks, etc. They even have the super treated stuff for dock pilings in salt water. Think 10x10 or bigger, 24 ft long, treated to 3 pcf or so I think. Heavy stuff too. I wouldn't put a lot of faith in spray on solutions. Better to put dried lumber in an autoclave under pressure for a while, force the anti-everything solution all the way thru. What do the wineries build with ?
    Pressure treated wood does not carry the fungicide into the wood to any great depth, even with "perforations" in the surface and any sawn ends have to be retreated with fungicide, but pressure treatment there is not practical. It's fine for earth, water, and concrete contact, fence posts and the like, but not as general construction lumber and it's toxic and takes paint poorly, so...
    Last edited by Bob Cleek; 01-11-2018 at 02:21 PM.

  15. #50
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    My shop building is full of dry-wood termites. (We have both here, subterranean and "flying.") Munch, munch, munch! I've researched this with some of the local old-timers. The general consensus is that the most economical approach on agricultural structures is not to go crazy trying to prevent them because it is more economical to simply have the building "tented and gassed" if they get really bad and simply replace the seriously damaged wood. I initially thought this was crazy, but after I thought about it and realized the dubious value of whatever preventatives are now available (the "good stuff" being now outlawed because it was too toxic and worked too well!) as well as their cost, measured against the "tent and gas and fix" approach, it started to make sense.

    The problem where Brian and I live is that the county has ordinances that prohibit tearing down the hundreds of old chicken houses and barns all around because of their "historical significance," (The tourists think them quaint.) and so they have been left to collapse of their own accord. Hundreds and hundreds of hundred-plus year-old dried-out old bare wooden buildings greatly encourage the spread of the dry-wood termites, unfortunately.

    I've checked out the pre-fab building market somewhat, though I'm sure Brian has researched it, and particularly barns, far more that I, but it's been my impression that pre-fab buildings of any sort are built with the cheapest materials to keep the market cost competitive. It's sort of like comparing the fit and finish of a properly built yacht to the fit and finish of a middle price range motor home. If you've ever had the pleasure of maintaining one of those, you'll know what I mean. Investing your own sweat equity in construction is a fine way to go, but I'd be leery of cutting corners on materials to any large extent. We've got so much Doug fir construction lumber available hereabouts, I find it hard to believe there'd be much savings over the long haul, shipping considered, in building with "foreign" lumber of significantly inferior quality.

    As for metal barns, well, yes... they can be aesthetically boring, but for a few bucks (not many) more, there are metal buildings that appear very traditional and can be had for a reasonable price, particularly if you have the metal barn outfit raise and enclose the structure for you and then you finish it off on your own. Another consideration for some may also be that the metal structures do not require interior posts and provide a lot more wide open floor space. Everybody's mileage varies on that score, though. The wealthy "hobby farmers" with their "estates" and three acres of grapes seem to prefer historical recreations, which are quite nice, but very pricey, while the farmers who are making a living at it now all seem to go for the prefabricated steel agricultural buildings. I guess it's a lot like yachts versus workboats in that respect.

  16. #51
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianM View Post
    The speed with which these goes together means I can get a group of friends and relatives together over a weekend to erect the "bents", then roof and side it at my leisure.
    A good old-fashioned barn raising!

    I participated in a house raising many many years ago out in Western Massachusetts. The homeowners were Technical Directors at competing theaters (he was at the Huntington in Boston, she was at ART over in Cambridge) their combined organizational and building skills meant we went from bare foundation and a pile of parts to a fully framed house over a long weekend. It was quite a party with a bunch of theater carpenters putting something together that was meant to last longer than 6 weeks!
    Steve

    Boats, like whiskey, are all good.
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by stromborg View Post
    A good old-fashioned barn raising!

    I participated in a house raising many many years ago out in Western Massachusetts. The homeowners were Technical Directors at competing theaters (he was at the Huntington in Boston, she was at ART over in Cambridge) their combined organizational and building skills meant we went from bare foundation and a pile of parts to a fully framed house over a long weekend. It was quite a party with a bunch of theater carpenters putting something together that was meant to last longer than 6 weeks!
    I've had a couple of frame raisings & they are great fun - especially the keg & all the food afterwards.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  18. #53
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    PERMITS.....

    What's getting old is having to learn everything the hard way. Time after time, the County Permitting Staff will lay down a requirement, but either have no background or provide no help in what to look out for/ do etc to fulfill the requirement.

    You essentially have to hire 'Experts' to get the nugget of what you need to know/do to satisfy the rules.. I gotta say, that's a beautiful career-guarding design.. sorta like Lawyers and Laws.

    For instance.. the Structural Engineer at County tells me I need to hire a Structural Engineer to inspect the foundation to see if it has any significant heat damage from the fire.

    So I talk to THAT guy, and he says other than eyeballing it, and "ringing" it with a hammering device, ....." we can't do much to tell you about the strength and integrity of this existing structure. We don't know what concrete was used, nor how much rebar was placed inside, nor how it is tied together, so we can't put our stamp on it." As a somewhat rational thinking Engineer.. I don't like this, but it makes sense and is reasonable for what I'm putting in front of him, and asking him to do.
    So $$$$$ - later.. all I know is it is undamaged, but I can't use it on a permitted structure because it won't pass Structural/ Seismic Approval.

    The people selling the kits say "just penetrate the existing foundation, and sink piers up to the current standard"....

    The hired Structural Engineer says " those piers need to be tied together in our expansive (crappy clay) soil to meet seismic"....

    After spinning around in a circle two or three times, I may need to build a new foundation!

    Mind you, this is in light of the code that says based on my Ag. zoning.. if I had just 2 more acres to meet the 5 acre minimum.. they'd have NO say on requiring a permit to build a barn!


    Given enough time, I'll get anything done. My buddy and I already have the heavy concrete breaking routine down.

    To take out the old foundation, he'll drive the rented Bobcat with 3 ton hammer, I load the dump trailer and keep shuttling the highly overloaded dually to the local quarry to weigh and dispose.

    We can follow a blueprint and do the excavation and rebar placement.. hell he builds racing motorcycles and I've owned Wooden Boats!

    We'll see how it goes.

  19. #54
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Not to sidetrack too much, but I replaced a set of porch stairs on a house in Burlington, VT. The inspector said that the bottom step was 1" too high, so the stairs would have to be rebuilt. There were 3 wide flagstones leading up to the stairs that had sunk into the ground some, so I dug them out, put some gravel & sand under them & raised them an inch.

    He came back to check it again & said "These look like exactly the same stairs". I said "Do they all have the same rise?" He said yes & walked away - after signing the permit. Just as he got in the car, he stopped, walked back up & said "You raised the flagstones didn't you?" I said yes, he grinned & said "You almost fooled me" & walked back to the car.

    That rated a celebratory beer. Zoning regs & inspectors can be a real PITA.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  20. #55
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Could you buy 2 acres for what it's costing to do all this other stuff?

  21. #56
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    You have two big big hurdles to jump, earthquake country and a fire damaged Foundation ( whether it is or not).

    I know you're in love with wood. But for what you are doing, what you need, and where you're at, check out this, no affiliation.

    http://www.rhinobldg.com/metal-buildings-in-california/
    Last edited by DeniseO30; 01-12-2018 at 01:38 PM.
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by Thad View Post
    Could you buy 2 acres for what it's costing to do all this other stuff?
    Fantastic Solution!


    I'd love that!

  23. #58
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by DeniseO30 View Post
    You have two big big hurdles to jump, earthquake country and a fire damaged Foundation ( whether it is or not).

    I know you're in love with wood. But for what you are doing, what you need, and where you're at, check out this, no affiliation.

    http://www.rhinobldg.com/metal-buildings-in-california/


    This actually would not solve my problems. Foundation is still the tripping point. Same problem, different structure.


    Then there's the cheesy ultra thin metal... you have to understand.. most potato chips are 3 times thicker than 29 gauge steel. You lean on this building and you'll dent it. It's like asking me to take pride in owning Harbor Freight sourced tools.. nope, not in this lifetime.


    I'm really not concerned about wild fires getting my next barn. My barn burnt due to My negligence. I'm surrounded by grasslands and there are no trees or shrubs on my place.

  24. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrianM View Post
    This actually would not solve my problems. Foundation is still the tripping point. Same problem, different structure.


    Then there's the cheesy ultra thin metal... you have to understand.. most potato chips are 3 times thicker than 29 gauge steel. You lean on this building and you'll dent it. It's like asking me to take pride in owning Harbor Freight sourced tools.. nope, not in this lifetime.


    I'm really not concerned about wild fires getting my next barn. My barn burnt due to My negligence. I'm surrounded by grasslands and there are no trees or shrubs on my place.
    Well I hope it's going/goes better than it reads! I still think Quonset Huts belong on the moon lol

    Sent from my LG-M430 using Tapatalk
    Denise, Bristol PA, Oday30, Anchor Yacht Club, On tidal Delaware River. my current project; http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthre...0-Ducker-Resto

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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan H View Post
    Umm.. you're spending $50,000 to build a structure to build small boats in? I hate to be the poopoo but honestly...

    Unless this is your business, that makes no economic sense at all.

    Now it might be that you want want want, absolutely must have a boatbuilding and woodworking shop, and screw any sort of logic about it because that's what makes you happy. If that's the case, then what the hell, screw the cost.

    Also your original post stated replacing a BARN, which is a barn, not a woodworking shop. If that's the case, then everything I just wrote is null and void!

    When you own a property for which you have a loan, the lender gets to say what you build and don't build to some extent when replacing damaged structures. The structures were/are part of the value calculation for the property. The County has actually reduced my property taxes a few bucks in the interim where I have an empty foundation. The barn which was also a woodworking shop burnt of course completely with its contents. Fire insurance defrays losses. Lenders have the rights to and take control of the building replacement funds. They dictate how it is spent (i.e. no drinking binges in Mexico.. I actually have to put a barn back where there is one missing).

    I'll be back to "Square One" of buying a property which had a barn on it for which I intended to live and build small boats, with NO out of pocket expenses.

    The chastity of "logic" remains unscathed.

  26. #61
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Well I pushed "go" and the drafting stage is done and it's off to Engineering for loading calcs and seismic:



    This is a little smaller than the building it replaces, but ALL the space will be useful so this is one of many things I'm very grateful for.

    Here are the bents and how they are joined together. Notice the knee braces that bolt down to the sill plate. This is one modification needed to meet California's tendency to shake now and then. With their addition, I'm told no plywood will be needed to stiffen against sheer, so the boards viewed on the outside are visible inside.. should be pretty nice to look at and beats the pants off my 1986 plywood on stick-built barn for aesthetics.


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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...


  28. #63
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...


  29. #64
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Nice! I'm surprised they didn't also want angle bracing at the plate spanning between each bent. Seems a logical place to put it, and with no ply sheathing in the roof (or maybe there is) the middle of those bents will sway a lot fore an aft even if the posts stay vertical. I would have put braced plates where the eaves meet the walls for the same reason.

  30. #65
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by J.Madison View Post
    Nice! I'm surprised they didn't also want angle bracing at the plate spanning between each bent. Seems a logical place to put it, and with no ply sheathing in the roof (or maybe there is) the middle of those bents will sway a lot fore an aft even if the posts stay vertical. I would have put braced plates where the eaves meet the walls for the same reason.
    I'm as surprised. I thought for sure (although the jury is still out as the Engineer has not yet completed his say yet) I'd need plywood in the walls.

    The roof sheathing is just 2x6 tongue-in-groove so not much sheer resistance there.

    If my foundation mods come in under budget.... I am considering nailing 1/2 ply directly in place of the exterior sheathing, then applying building wrap and then the siding out side of that. It's about $1800 in plywood to cover.

    This would kill air leaks and make the place a little more suitable for cast iron/steel tools by reducing heat/cold swings and condensation. I have a line on cheap mill off-cuts of Doug Fir 1x8 which could be cut short, and nailed over the ply on the inside between the girts and the posts. It will give me more insulation, and cover up that ugly looking plywood.

    We'll see how it shakes out. I doubt foundation modifications will come in under my budget.. but we can dream.

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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianM View Post
    Well I pushed "go" and the drafting stage is done and it's off to Engineering for loading calcs and seismic:



    This is a little smaller than the building it replaces, but ALL the space will be useful so this is one of many things I'm very grateful for.

    Here are the bents and how they are joined together. Notice the knee braces that bolt down to the sill plate. This is one modification needed to meet California's tendency to shake now and then. With their addition, I'm told no plywood will be needed to stiffen against sheer, so the boards viewed on the outside are visible inside.. should be pretty nice to look at and beats the pants off my 1986 plywood on stick-built barn for aesthetics.

    Hmm?
    Whilst this is built in a country that hardly shakes at all.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  32. #67
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by Peerie Maa View Post
    Hmm?
    Whilst this is built in a country that hardly shakes at all.
    Beautiful Mortise and Tenon joints. One reason the kit I've settled on is because the joints are simply butted with steel plates and bolting. Each of these suppliers offers the Mortise and Tenon options at a premium. I do admire the sheer resistance offered by the knees in the rafters. Wind and Snow loads of course are the other major considerations for building strength and stiffness for which my region is low risk (high winds) and no risk (snow).

    What is not illustrated above are the roof girts every 30" with two lag bolts per landing. This does offer SOME sheer resistance.
    Last edited by BrianM; 03-21-2018 at 04:28 PM. Reason: spelling

  33. #68
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    When you say "roof girts", what are they?
    In our parlance 'purlins" connect the bents along the roof rafters.
    'Girts" connect the bents up the walls.
    I'm guessing that sills, top plates and ridge beams are also not shown?
    Just trying to understand here.



  34. #69
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by jackster View Post
    When you say "roof girts", what are they?
    In our parlance 'purlins" connect the bents along the roof rafters.
    'Girts" connect the bents up the walls.
    I'm guessing that sills, top plates and ridge beams are also not shown?
    Just trying to understand here.

    yes, purlins. I won't be building another one of these, so I won't be expert in terminology.. but I do know the difference between a frame and a rib!

    By the use of "OUR" I take it that you make timber frames for a living?

  35. #70
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    Default Re: Building a New Post and Beam Boatshop.. Materials...

    Quote Originally Posted by BrianM View Post
    Beautiful Mortise and Tenon joints. One reason the kit I've settled on is because the joints are simply butted with steel plates and bolting. Each of these suppliers offers the Mortise and Tenon options at a premium. I do admire the sheet resistance offered by the knees in the rafters. Wind and Snow loads of course are the other major considerations for building strength and stiffness for which my region is low risk (high winds) and no risk (snow).

    What is not illustrated above are the roof girts every 30" with two lag bolts per landing. This does offer SOME sheer resistance.
    Quote Originally Posted by jackster View Post
    When you say "roof girts", what are they?
    At 30" spacing I would assume rafters. The rafters are not yet on that timber frame I posted.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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