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Thread: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

  1. #1
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    Default Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    I'm helping to restore a knot board on the Battleship TEXAS, and I need to reproduce a wire eyesplice using a technique known as a German Lock. Does anyone know what that is? We've got a Liverpool splice, a Roebling splice and a Navy splice. I've looked online, but haven't found anything on this German Lock.

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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    I think I've heard of what we call swage fittings referred to that way but my memory on that is uncertain. It's like the Roebing but round and pressure deformed to fit. Some swages are aluminum or copper and can be applied with hand tools while some are whole fitting ends, machine rolled, stainless. I am surprised to see no mention of the Molly Hogan. There are also those U bolts with a saddle that we call 'telegraph clips' but have other names.

    On the tugs I once joined two lines to make an ultralong tow - 3" diameter rope into a siezed carrick bend. And it worked well.

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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    Maybe this can help you. Quote from Wikipedia: "When this type of rope splice is used specifically on wire rope, it is called a "Molly Hogan", and, by some, a "Dutch" eye instead of a "Flemish" eye".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire_rope

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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Utterberg View Post
    Maybe this can help you. Quote from Wikipedia: "When this type of rope splice is used specifically on wire rope, it is called a "Molly Hogan", and, by some, a "Dutch" eye instead of a "Flemish" eye".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wire_rope
    This makes sense. We call them Flemish eyes, but if also known as Dutch eyes I can see German eye as well.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  5. #5
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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    I sure hope one of our real riggers gets here . . .

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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    Thanks for the replies. The Flemish eye might be close. I'll have to check that out. As for the mechanical methods mentioned, I should reinforce that this is a knot board, and the other examples are hand worked eye splices, not swages or cast fittings. For example, the Roebling splice is a wire eye that is spliced against the lay - much as you would hemp or other stranded line. The others are spliced with the lay such as the Liverpool splice, which is what I was taught years ago as the only way to splice wire. It's fascinating (in an admittedly nerdy way) to learn about these other techniques.

    Gonna have to see if my old Ashley book of Knots survived hurricane Harvey. Much of my library did not. Some family friends were helping with the tear out, and they disposed of a great many waterlogged or mildewed books and frankly, I am grateful. That's the one task I couldn't have faced. I haven't yet had the heart to sort through the survivors.

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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    Too lazy to dig out Ashley tonight, but this is interesting.


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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    Quote Originally Posted by Junkyard Dog View Post
    Thanks for the replies. The Flemish eye might be close. I'll have to check that out. As for the mechanical methods mentioned, I should reinforce that this is a knot board, and the other examples are hand worked eye splices, not swages or cast fittings. For example, the Roebling splice is a wire eye that is spliced against the lay - much as you would hemp or other stranded line. The others are spliced with the lay such as the Liverpool splice, which is what I was taught years ago as the only way to splice wire. It's fascinating (in an admittedly nerdy way) to learn about these other techniques.

    Gonna have to see if my old Ashley book of Knots survived hurricane Harvey. Much of my library did not. Some family friends were helping with the tear out, and they disposed of a great many waterlogged or mildewed books and frankly, I am grateful. That's the one task I couldn't have faced. I haven't yet had the heart to sort through the survivors.
    As I suspected for a KNOT board. In which case it is probably a Flemish eye, as a reliable way of eye splicing wire.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    I found this, Rope Splicing (1950), by PW Blandford ("Assistant County Commisioner Sea Scouts, Warwickshire"). He discuess the German eye splice on page 15. It would seem to meet the criteria in the O.P. (used for wire rope, with a locking tuck):


    German Eye Splice. This splice (fig. 16) differs from the common eye splice in the formation of the first tuck, by introducing a "locking tuck". The locking tuck -- the arranging of two end strands in opposite directions under the same main strand -- is frequently used in wire splicing, but is not usually found in rope work.

    To make a German eye splice, bend the rope into an eye and lay all three end strands across on the top of the standing part at right angles to its lay (A). Tuck No. 3 strand under a convenient main strand against the lay (B), then take No. 2 strand under the same strand, but with the lay (C). Tuck No. 1 strand in the same space as No. 2, but against the lay (D). There should now be one strand emerging from each space in the standing part (E). From this point tuck "over and under one", as for a common eye splice.

    Screen Shot 2017-12-28 at 2.20.06 PM.jpg

    Last edited by Nicholas Carey; 12-28-2017 at 09:41 PM.
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  10. #10
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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    ^ Well done that man. I'm guessing Percy Blandford of DIY boatbuilding fame.
    It really is quite difficult to build an ugly wooden boat.

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  11. #11
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    Default Re: Question for riggers and marlinspike experts

    There is a book, splicing wire and fibre rope, I believe, that may be of some help.
    It is interesting in some ways, for example the first tucks of the liverpool splice and the crane splice are reversed to what is normally teached. It also has the locking tuck as more or less an option. I don't know, I don't have the book here obviously, but I think it mentions about 10 different wire splices.

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student, a rigger apprentice and Journeyman http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/

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    S. This book: Splicng Wire and Fiber Rope, by Raoul Graumont.



    Good book.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

  13. #13
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    Default

    Also https://fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/ship/nstm/ch613.pdf, the USN rigging manual. Might want to find an old version of it.
    You would not enjoy Nietzsche, sir. He is fundamentally unsound. — P.G. Wodehouse (Carry On, Jeeves)

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