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Thread: Thin hardwood stock

  1. #106
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    New westminster BC
    Posts
    2,507

    Default Re: Thin hardwood stock

    I haven't made any progress on ukuleles but I did find this on a woodworking site I visit. It's called a Boggs vacuum box after the fellow that makes chairs. It loolks like it could make a thickness planer perform better with thin stock. The box sits stationary in the planer and the stock passes over it,the holes in the box top sit right under the cutting head and the vacuum keeps the thin material from being lifted into the cutters.

    box 2.jpg









    box 3.jpg

  2. #107
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Viroqua, Wisconsin
    Posts
    297

    Default Re: Thin hardwood stock

    (Failed to note this thread started over three years ago when I replied to the OP's opening post... here's hoping my $0.02 is worthwhile!)

    Quote Originally Posted by cathouse willy View Post
    I have need for some thin stock, something 1.5 to 2 mm thick. My thickness planer will take it down to 3.5 mm. Does anyone here use a sled to get thinner stock from their planer? Any other methods?
    I have a 10" INCA 510 I bought back in 1977 that, with a sled (made around 1982 of a waxed cut-out blank from a solid-core wood exterior door) on the planer bed, did me some fine Teak veneer to 3/32". I've never had need of anything thinner, but with care it might do what you're suggesting. Much depends on the style of planer head (two or three knives, straight or helical, the species and quality of wood chosen) for what you'll get out of the effort.

    In another thread somewhere here a few days ago I learned of the 'SHELIX' planer head development. Contacting them I discovered they can supply a head to fit my INCA. Pricey upgrade for a 44 year-old machine but with the restrictions on activities since spring that I used to spend 'disposable income' on I find I've managed to save some $$ this year I can thus 'invest'.

    If it also effects significantly quieter planer operation than the stock two-blade head I'll get more use out of said planer too. Noise has been an irritant to my spouse now that my workshop's under her studio rather than in the detached garage I had to my lonesome back when we lived elsewhere going on eight years ago. This insert-head helical design reportedly offers a vast decrease in noise generated during planer operations.

    An acquaintance near me put one on a Delta planer he uses, raves about being able to plane end-grain 'butcher block' with absolutely no tear outs, and I've seen what he makes with mine own eyes so I know he's not stringing me along.

    I'll be testing whether this technology lets even thinner stock be milled once the one I've ordered up has arrived, maybe sometime this coming March. I'll update this post once I have more to offer.
    Last edited by sp_clark; 12-25-2020 at 10:13 AM.

  3. #108
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Viroqua, Wisconsin
    Posts
    297

    Default Re: Thin hardwood stock

    Quote Originally Posted by cathouse willy View Post
    It's called a Boggs vacuum box after the fellow that makes chairs. It loolks like it could make a thickness planer perform better with thin stock. The box sits stationary in the planer and the stock passes over it,the holes in the box top sit right under the cutting head and the vacuum keeps the thin material from being lifted into the cutters.
    OUTSTANDING IDEA! Thanks for posting that!

    The INCA 510 I just posted about was too early a design to feature anything facilitating chip-collection other than a plastic hood for the planer's head to throw chips seven or eight feet away to pile up onto the floor. I made a similar contraption as this but with no top that sits on the planer bed during jointing, to collect and redirect chips into a dust-collection hose. Be piece'o'cake to make another but with the vacuum platen the Boggs shows.

    I made something similar 30 years ago for contact printing film negatives for graphic arts work so the concept's entirely familiar to me. Some provision for 'bleeding off' some of the vacuum force may be necessary if it's found too high a level makes the material being processed tend to slow down....
    Last edited by sp_clark; 12-25-2020 at 10:14 AM.

  4. #109
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Billings, Montana
    Posts
    934

    Default Re: Thin hardwood stock

    Here is some thin hardwood. Cherry rim for this mandolin is 0.05". It wouldn't bend until that thin and even then it was very difficult without breaking or cracking. Finished carving the cherry back. Working on the sinker redwood soundboard. That is some amazing wood.

    No comments on the state of the shop.

    [IMG]Untitled by Gary Davis, on Flickr[/IMG]

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