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Thread: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

  1. #1
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    Default `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    So last week the fan on my laptop GPU decided it couldn't go on any longer and quietly laid down and died. A PITA to be sure. I hate taking laptops apart, but at least I had a replacement fan. So procrastination does pay off, remember that kids.

    With the part in hand all I needed was a tube of thermal compound. Easy. There is a computer store right next to London Drugs which is where I was going to buy myself a Christmas present in the form of a new KitchenAid stand mixer. Well. . . no mixer for me. Maybe.

    Instead, I came home with this, a Sony HAP-S1, a hard drive based high resolution audio player. Smartphone remote support, Internet radio, and if I have a CD player plugged in, it'll rip from that CD and write either a WAV or a FLAC file.

    But the best part was the price. It was on sale for 50% off at $499.00. I got the last one on the Island. . .
    The sound is amazing!

    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Interesting product. I had never heard of it, but it makes complete and total sense... better than merely plugging an iPod into a stereo system. From a functional perspective, it looks very much like the way I use my iPod attached to my car stereo... but with wi-fi connectivity, to permit things like info retrieval from Gracenote.

    One interesting feature, is shown in one of the photos from Sony's site... it's a discrete copper 'star ground' on the PC board. I've never seen anything like that. It isn't clear that it's a specific advantage, from a circuit point of view... other than making some debugging easier, by providing a way to isolate grounds... but it certainly looks cool! See the bottom right photo, in the collage.

    https://www.sony.com/electronics/aud...ponents/hap-s1
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
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  3. #3
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    So, basically it stores digital versions of music to play on your high-end speakers?

    I like it!

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    I love the fact that is has support for Gracenote. I'll never edit another ID3 tag.
    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    So, basically it stores digital versions of music to play on your high-end speakers?

    I like it!
    It also has a line out function which I'm using to run the audio through my Onkyo receiver.
    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    ugh. . . time for work
    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Holst's The Planets, in 96kHz/24bit audio, on a pair of Sennheiser HD959 headphones.
    Yeah, money well spent.

    I see Aqualung has been remastered in Hi-Res. . .
    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    My son told me Iím stoked for you.

    I donít know what you said after stand mixer, except onkyo receiver.

    I listen to CDs through my onkyo receiver and an old DVD player.

    Peace,
    No Audio Apps Or Files, Itís Sad, Really

  9. #9
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    WHAT?

    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Ugh.... Sony. Remember Imagestation? Sony did then what Photobucket is doing now. I still boycott Sony products as a result.
    "Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts. Broad, wholesome and charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime" Mark Twain... so... Carpe the living sh!t out of the Diem

    I'd rather look back at my life and say "I can't believe I did that" instead of being there saying "I wish I'd done that"

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Sony steps in it from time to time, can't argue that. But I've never bought a bad product with their name on it.

    I had a 19" Vaio with the best looking screen I've ever seen on any laptop.
    My current TV is a Bravia, hooked up to a PS3 and a PS4, all of it works flawlessly.
    Then there is my new best friend, HAP. . .

    I've got enough forgiveness for both of us.
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    I tend to think the restoration of lower quality digital audio to it's original quality is not what you would use the box for and expect to get hi rez results. For DSD and 24 bit 96 k playback it should be great, depending on the quality of the power amps. If you already had a good amp then the line out into your existing system would be the way to go. I use a Crown DC 300 into a pair of duntech esquire speakers and play audio from the computer using MOTU converters. I would love a DSD recorder / playback system
    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    ^ No, the remastered label is a bait, I get that. I just really like Jethro Tull.

    I shouldn't toss out that audiophile word so casually, as I'm certainly not one. This Sony is probably the one bit of gear that comes close to the mark, otherwise my setup is pretty run of the mill. I've a decent Onkyo receiver and run that through a set of Mordaunt Short speakers. Buying this player was more about seamless integration of my digital collection, and not about adding to a pile of high end equipment.
    Nosce te ipsum

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    24 bits?

    Hahahaha!!!!

    Sorry, but '24 bits' is a technobabble advertising hype. There are no 24 bit A/D or D/A converters, operating at audio rates, which would pass the laugh test. There ARE 24 bit converters, operating VERY slowly (a few conversions per second) which, if analyzed statistically over many conversion and many seconds, might ALMOST approach something definable as '24 bits'... but most certainly NOT at audio rates.

    16 bits? Sure. 18 bits? Yeah, but beyond that, it's pretty dicey....

    ...but far more to the point: NONE of these would pass a well-designed double blind comparison. You simply CANNOT differentiate, beyond 16 bits.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Quote Originally Posted by amish rob View Post
    I listen to CDs through my onkyo receiver and an old DVD player.

    Peace,
    No Audio Apps Or Files, It’s Sad, Really
    I listen to a lot of music through my piano. Old-school Analog, baby.
    If I use the word "God," I sure don't mean an old man in the sky who just loves the occasional goat sacrifice. - Anne Lamott

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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Quote Originally Posted by TomF View Post
    I listen to a lot of music through my piano. Old-school Analog, baby.
    To be perfectly clear, we have a cajon, an accordion, and bass and guitar amplifiers in the living room.
    One of our favorite musical pastimes is extemporaneous raps laid over the cajon.

    But, Bad Brains.(I donít listen to the vinyls, anymore. They mostly sound like hissing anymore, anyway)

    I love I Jah.

    Peace,
    Sailing On

  17. #17
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    24 bits?

    Hahahaha!!!!

    Sorry, but '24 bits' is a technobabble advertising hype. There are no 24 bit A/D or D/A converters, operating at audio rates, which would pass the laugh test. There ARE 24 bit converters, operating VERY slowly (a few conversions per second) which, if analyzed statistically over many conversion and many seconds, might ALMOST approach something definable as '24 bits'... but most certainly NOT at audio rates.

    16 bits? Sure. 18 bits? Yeah, but beyond that, it's pretty dicey....

    ...but far more to the point: NONE of these would pass a well-designed double blind comparison. You simply CANNOT differentiate, beyond 16 bits.
    You might like this.
    https://medium.com/@skikirkwood/trut...d-a365e56c97c4

    I do still place value on the quality of materials used, up to a point, and the fit and finish of a product. Which is why I'm willing to spend a little more. . . a little more. I sure as hell am not spending a $1,000 a foot for cat5 network cable, or $3,500 for a USB cable! I'm good with a fancy $500 mp3 player though.
    Nosce te ipsum

  18. #18
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dryfoot View Post
    Yeah, it's quite the chuckle. Technobabble really can sell a product... even when it's complete, utter bullsh|t.

    Quote Originally Posted by Old Dryfoot View Post
    I do still place value on the quality of materials used, up to a point, and the fit and finish of a product. Which is why I'm willing to spend a little more. . . a little more. I sure as hell am not spending a $1,000 a foot for cat5 network cable, or $3,500 for a USB cable! I'm good with a fancy $500 mp3 player though.
    Well, $500 for that player you bought doesn't seem all that excessive, to me... it's more or less a home version of what is installed in most cars today (in the sense that it retrieves audio files organized by song, album, artist, or genre), but with some nice conveniences, like the ability to communicate with wifi, and the ability to read off an external disk. I doubt that the sound quality is all that different from many other devices/arrangements, etc... but it sure is convenient, if you listen to music at home.

    I never listen to music, at home, myself.... but I do listen, in the car. For a long time, I've had a small iPod, with about 7Gb of music, plugged into my 2013 Honda Accord... and I set the player for randomized song selection.

    However, that iPod is in the process of dying... the front panel has de-laminated, and it's only a matter of time. To replace it, I bought a couple of $19 mp3 players from amazon... which are frankly awful, as 'walking around' mp3 players (inconvenient controls), but are every bit as good as the $200 iPod, as a means of mass storage, for the car. They hold 16Gb (I'm only using about 7 Gb worth), and are a 'plug in and forget' accessory... they come on when the car is running, and go off when I shut off the car, so battery life is not an issue.

    What they CAN'T do, unfortunately, is play .aax audiobook files. However, I've got a simple little program to convert .aax (the DRM protected format used by Audible) to .mp3, so I can still use the cheap player for the same purpose.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
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  19. #19
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    Default Re: `Puter problems, and a new toy! Audiophile brag. :D

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    24 bits?

    Hahahaha!!!!

    Sorry, but '24 bits' is a technobabble advertising hype. There are no 24 bit A/D or D/A converters, operating at audio rates, which would pass the laugh test. There ARE 24 bit converters, operating VERY slowly (a few conversions per second) which, if analyzed statistically over many conversion and many seconds, might ALMOST approach something definable as '24 bits'... but most certainly NOT at audio rates.

    16 bits? Sure. 18 bits? Yeah, but beyond that, it's pretty dicey....

    ...but far more to the point: NONE of these would pass a well-designed double blind comparison. You simply CANNOT differentiate, beyond 16 bits.
    So is this all Bulldust Norm?
    http://tweakheadz.com/16-bit-vs-24-bit-audio/

    im no digital audio expert but they do exist........24 bits to the recording engineer is definitely not technobabble advertising hype.
    From Wikipedia explanation:
    In basic implementations, variations in bit depth primarily affect the noise level from quantization error—thus the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and dynamic range. However, techniques such as dithering, noise shaping and oversampling mitigate these effects without changing the bit depth. Bit depth also affects bit rate and file size.
    Bit depth is only meaningful in reference to a PCM digital signal. Non-PCM formats, such as lossy compression formats, do not have associated bit depths. For example, in MP3, quantization is performed on PCM samples that have been transformed into the frequency domain.
    Most processing operations on digital audio involve requantization of samples, and thus introduce additional rounding error analogous to the original quantization error introduced during analog to digital conversion. To prevent rounding error larger than the implicit error during ADC, calculations during processing must be performed at higher precisions than the input samples.[21]
    Digital signal processing (DSP) operations can be performed in either fixed point or floating point precision. In either case, the precision of each operation is determined by the precision of the hardware operations used to perform each step of the processing and not the resolution of the input data. For example, on x86 processors, floating point operations are performed at 32- or 64-bit precision and fixed point operations at 16-, 32- or 64-bit resolution. Consequently, all processing performed on Intel-based hardware will be performed at 16-, 32- or 64-bit integer precision, or 32- or 64-bit floating point precision regardless of the source format. However, if memory is at a premium, software may still choose to output lower resolution 16- or 24-bit audio after higher precision processing.
    Fixed point digital signal processors often support unusual word sizes and precisions in order to support specific signal resolutions. For example, the Motorola 56000 DSP chip uses 24-bit word sizes, 24-bit multipliers and 56-bit accumulators to perform multiply-accumulate operations on two 24-bit samples without overflow or rounding.[22] On devices that do not support large accumulators, fixed point operations may be implicitly rounded, reducing precision to below that of the input samples.
    Errors compound through multiple stages of DSP at a rate that depends on the operations being performed. For uncorrelated processing steps on audio data without a DC offset, errors are assumed to be random with zero mean. Under this assumption, the standard deviation of the distribution represents the error signal, and quantization error scales with the square root of the number of operations.[23] High levels of precision are necessary for algorithms that involve repeated processing, such as convolution.[21] High levels of precision are also necessary in recursive algorithms, such as infinite impulse response (IIR) filters.[24] In the particular case of IIR filters, rounding error can degrade frequency response and cause instability.[21]
    Last edited by Hallam; 12-08-2017 at 07:17 AM.
    If war is the answer........... it must be a profoundly stupid question

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