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Thread: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

  1. #36
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
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    Brisbane, Australia
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    I have the exact same sail in a box ready for when I finish my build. It was made by Far East Sails. If you need any dimensions etc, just yell out.

  2. #37
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    Aug 2013
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    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greenman View Post
    I have the exact same sail in a box ready for when I finish my build. It was made by Far East Sails. If you need any dimensions etc, just yell out.
    Hey, you miss the fun sewing yourself... Just kidding, you are probably smarter than me ☺

    I get all I need in this thread, happy for all replies! but maybe I need ideas for positioning the reefs.

    Sent fra min SM-N950F via Tapatalk

  3. #38
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    Mar 2014
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    Hasslö, Blekinge, Sweden
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    SMA says "The first reef row reduces the sail area by 30%", which is no hard rule of course but a decent starting point.
    The next row with equal distance to the first as the first to the foot.
    I always put the reef row tilted so that the reef clew comes higher than the reef tack, maybe by 5-10 cm for your boat, next row tilted some more.
    SMA says this is only for boomed sails, but I like to do it anyways since with harder winds I like to have the clew further away from my head, and I usually have the reefed sail hoisted a bit lower than the unreefed.
    I put the reef points a bit lower on the sail than a parallel with the foot line from tack to clew, so as to put most or all of the strain on the tack/clew.
    Reef points perhaps 50 cm apart (not too important, what looks good)

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student and as a rigger apprentice http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/ in Swedish only, but there are many pictures :-)

  4. #39
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Madison Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Pre-cut Dac tape is fine if you're working with white Dacron. The sailcloth manufacturers don't generally offer it in colors, though Sairite might, as they can cut their own with their plotter. I cut my own, since most of my sails are either cream or tanbark fabric, with an occasional other color used. When splitting fabric for narrow panels, I'll occasionally leave one panel width to be cut up into my luff, head or foot tapes. Diagonal taped and sewn splices can be used if you have to make longer strips. I do panel cutting and splitting with a utility knife. It is a bit more prone to raveling along the edges than some sort of hot-cutter would produce, but once seams and edges have been tape-basted and zig-zagged-over it really isn't a problem. Hot knife slitting (even with a very good one) tends to make ugly, irregular edges. I'd rather trim off a few loose strands once in a while than have ugly melted edges all the time.

    Once I took ten yards of Egyptian Cream Dacron, rolled it up very tightly and evenly on the cardboard tube and then cut a series of panel widths and edge tape widths with my band saw, sawing through the tube and all. It almost worked. It generated enough heat to semi-seal the cut edge, but once unrolled, the panels had just enough wobble along their edges to be non-usable and difficult to join neatly. In the end, those panels had to be re-cut to a slightly narrower width and straight edges with a knife. The same experiment on the radial arm saw yielded a pretty violently torn up hunk of Dacron.

    I fold by hand and rub the crease down with the handle of a small screw driver. I probably should make myself a nice little seam rubber, but it's a bit late at this point. I needed one when making my first sail in 1980 and just grabbed the little screwdriver that came with my sewing machine. I used the plastic handle to rub down the creases on the edge tapes. It worked OK and every creased piece of Dac tape on every sail I've ever built has been rubbed down with that same cheap little screwdriver's handle. It's getting pretty worn down from it at this point.

    seam-rubber.jpg

    I always put the reef row tilted so that the reef clew comes higher than the reef tack, maybe by 5-10 cm for your boat, next row tilted some more.
    Reef lines on a standing lug (especially second or third reefs) should be drawn out and planned very carefully. Putting the reef in requires moving a former spot on the luff, which had been out ahead of the mast, back aft to the mast to be the new reef tack. If you want to be able to reef without having to move the halyard tie off point or without it drastically changing the location of the CE and tilting the whole yard/sail/boom or foot angle scenario, then you may need to do some dramatic angle changing on upper reef lines. This doesn't happen on balanced lugs, but can on standing lugs. You can usually get away with a "normal" reef angle for the first reef, but the angle of the second one may need to be changed as shown here to keep the boom or foot from ending up at some funky angle and the CE dramatically out of place.

    SL-reefs.jpg

  5. #40
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    Thanks for the generous replies. This is really what I hoped for making this thread!

    The shipping cost from Sailite is very high compared to some ebay shops. A few rolls with tape costs 44 usd to ship here... same as shipping the whole roll for the sail... I cant find any ebay shops selling precut tapes so I chose to cut strips myself.

    Here is my candidate to crease the folded tape. Its a polished reindeers antler I use to smooth the leather on my knife sheaths

    Sent fra min SM-N950F via Tapatalk

  6. #41
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    Mar 2014
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    Hasslö, Blekinge, Sweden
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Thanks Todd, easy to see that the first reef parallel to the foot gives a similar effect on a standing lug as I've intended on my gaff and sprit sails.
    I'll add that drawing the reefed sail(s) and a new calculation of the CE is a really good idea. Also for a boomless sail, the sheeting point is of some importance (although I have to admit I'm not very good at finding the best place).

    /Mats
    My blog about my time as a boat building student and as a rigger apprentice http://kaptenmohsart.blogspot.se/ in Swedish only, but there are many pictures :-)

  7. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    The Netherlands
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    84

    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hu5CwD47pH8. I would like to show of my pfaff130 while making a spritsail for the Whitehall Catherine. Frank

  8. #43
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Brisbane, Australia
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    80

    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Are there any advantages of going semi boomed? What I mean is using fibreglass the diameter of a fishing pole to provide some sail shape, without the full boom?

    Probably a stupid question, buy hey, what would I know. I'm new to all this.

  9. #44
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    Jun 2000
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    Madison Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Some of the high performance beach catamarans have used a sturdy, full length batten on the bottom of their sails in place of a boom. They're usually flat slabs, rather than round and have more bulk and stiffness than a fishing pole but something along those lines might be possible. It might yield a more useful lower sail shape when the sail is eased out for downwind.

  10. #45
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
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    Kilmarnock, Virginia!
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Quote Originally Posted by Fredostli View Post
    The shipping cost from Sailite is very high compared to some ebay shops. A few rolls with tape costs 44 usd to ship here... same as shipping the whole roll for the sail... I cant find any ebay shops selling precut tapes so I chose to cut strips myself.
    Duckworks Boat Building Supply also sells sails and sail making supplies for home-builders, at typically quite reasonable prices and great service. A good alternative to Sailrite, at the least. http://www.duckworksbbs.com/category-s/257.htm

    I've made some sails, including standing lugs - but probably wouldn't have if it weren't for Todd Bradshaw generously sharing his knowledge and experience. Thanks, Todd!

    Dave

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