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Thread: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

  1. #71
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Madison Wisconsin
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    8,950

    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    The short scenario: (1) Lay out the basic straight-line perimeter with string, using weights or tape at the corners since you can't use pins, nails, etc.
    (2) Use light battens to form the curves at head, leach and foot, measuring your rounds and/or hollows from the straight strings as reference. I suspect this may be
    a real bear to do with tape alone and you may need to come up with some sort of improvised spline weights to hold the battens in their curved shapes.
    (3) Put down your masking tape following the strings and battens to show the sail's actual perimeter, then remove the strings and battens.
    (4) Tape your broadseam area guidelines. You can also tape off the corner patch shapes and sizes if desired.
    (5) Start paneling, tape basting the seams with their broadseams, with 3"-4" or so of excess cloth outside of your tape perimeter on the luff, head and foot edges, as well as
    enough excess on the leech edge to fold a hem later.
    (6) Once paneled and broadseamed, you lay the sail over the lofting and mark, and/or cut the edges to their final shape. The broadseaming will have used up some cloth
    which is why we panel a bit oversized and then cut it to size after seam basting.
    (7) If desired, you can now remove the sail, lay some cloth over the lofted corner patch tape marks and cut out the largest patches for each corner. The weave direction should
    be oriented to match that of the sail panels in these areas. Smaller, under-patches can be made later, using the big ones as reference.

    At this point you are done with the lofting and can peel up the tape. It takes me maybe 3 or 4 hours to get to this point, but I've had a lot of practice. Even if it takes you twice that long or a bit more you could probably do it in one long session. That would be far better than having to loft and tape it out twice. The remaining steps will be sewing the panel seams, reinforcing the corners and edges and finally adding the hardware. These later steps are the ones that end up taking most of the time and could be done later in other sessions, but you no longer need the lofting to do them.

  2. #72
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    801

    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Thanks Todd. I will make som simple spline weights to use. Is 1,5 / inch overlap at the seams (widens at broadseams) suitable for this sail?

    I am one of the Voluntares, and sitting in the board for this old community house, keeping it alive, so I have the priviledge using it a weekend when there is no other arrangements. guess that will be enough. Patches etc. I can make at home.

  3. #73
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    Jun 2000
    Location
    Madison Wisconsin
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Normal seam overlap is a bit more than 1/2" and basted with 1/2" seam tape. We want a bit more width to be sure we don't have any tape exposed along the edges as it would pick up dirt, so figure .6", 5/8", 12mm or so for the finished seams - plus whatever gets added for broadseaming in those areas.

  4. #74
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    Default

    Thanks Todd, and I guess two rows of Zigzag machine stiches then...



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  5. #75
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Yep.

    You will need to roll the sail like a scroll for nearly every sewing pass through the machine. Having tried all manner of methods, clamps, tubes to wrap cloth around, etc. to roll it securely, I finally settled on chunks of 1" wide fiberglass strapping tape about 10" long. I pre-cut a bunch of them and stick them to a lamp stand next to the sewing machine. Once a section has been rolled (no tubes inside, etc. just rolled Dacron) I secure it with two or three of these tape strips. After sewing, they come off cleanly and they can be re-used three or four times before that lose enough of their stickiness to no longer be effective. After sewing the first pass, as shown below, I'll flip the roll over and sew the second pass from the other side (side, not end). The tape is secure enough to tolerate that.

    The reason for flipping the sail over for the second pass is that it helps keep both sides of your panel seams looking the same. When the needle goes into the Dacron cloth the entry hole on the top side is a bit cleaner looking than the exit hole on the bottom side (where it essentially "breaks out"). Flipping the sail between sewing the two stitch lines means that every double-stitched panel seam will end up with one line of each type. To my eye, that looks better than having one clean (entry) side of the sail and one, not so clean (break-out) side. It's a bit more work, compared to just running the roll through the machine twice on the same side, but I think it is worth the trouble cosmetically.

    sail const.3 006.jpg

  6. #76
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Oups!!! I discovered I drawed the second reef terribly wrong on my little scetch. I am surprised nobody commented. (guesss you are just silently laughing:-) Good thing I am not in a hurry here, Splashing 6 months ahead at least :-)

    I believe you see whats wrong, and I will ofcourse try to make something similar to Todds scetch here:


  7. #77
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    Aug 2013
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    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    Local community house perfect to loft the sail. Hope to get most of it done this weekend. A bit challenging to sew 100% straight and even with the slippery dacron, but it will be good enough for me. the panels are taped before sewing, so the shape will be ok.

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  8. #78
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
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    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    Not finished and wery curly

    I must do some hand-sewing around the corners, and reefs and make the reef points. I also consider some leather on the corners.

    The cloth got wery curly while working with it, but I gues it hard to avoid. This is far from a perfect made sail, but I think the shape is good, we will see when i hoist it the first time.




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    Last edited by Fredostli; 04-09-2018 at 01:53 AM.

  9. #79
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Billings, Montana
    Posts
    592

    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Looks wery good from Montana. You're a man of many talents.

    Have a great week. Almost spring here.

    Gary

  10. #80
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    Valnesfjord, Norway
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    801

    Default Re: Making a standing lugsail for my Argie 15 (Todd Bradshaw design)

    Looks good from a distance you say?

    I will keep everyone no closer than 3 meters, then it will look perfect! (If they have the sun in the face that is)

    Snowing 15-20 cm the two days I used to sew it together

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