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Thread: A very simple small kids model boat?

  1. #1
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    Default A very simple small kids model boat?

    My four year old and his friends had enormous fun this weekend with a pond and a couple of boats made from a croc shoe and twigs. So I'd love to make a few workable toys for xmas to share around.

    Desirable features;

    A flat bottom and lifting keel so they can be used in shllow water or inside, As kids we had some fantastic model scows made by our grandfather (thanks Fred, you are the best!). They had traditional lifting centreboards made from steel and a dead flat bottom so we had endless fun making little harbours for them and towing them around the shallows, and they sat happily on the beach or our shelves.

    The boat must really sail and should be more or less self righting at least from a wind point of view, our scows were not fully self righting but had a reasonable range of stability and sailed very nicely.

    Adjustable sails with reefing capabilities are useful for stronger winds. The scows sails could be raised and lowered and being double headsail ketches they had lots of combinations for heavy weather (at least as for a 16 inch model) and they could be adjusted to self steer in a variety of wind angles. We had endless fun playing with different sail combinations and watching the boats battle across a pond through giant waves and ferocious gusts under shortened sail.

    Easy to build, because xmas is close and I haven't got much time. I'd plan on building half a dozen or so identical boats, so extreme simplicity is very desirable.

    Concepts

    An unstayed Cat ketch or Cat Yawl seems the simplest rig with good self steering capabilities. A couple of mast steps can be incorporated and a simple bermudian sail that rolls around the mast for reefing or stowage seems easiest to make. A bit of fibreglass tube for a mast and the sails could be simple hotknifed nylon with duck tape patches and they could be doublesided taped to the mast then wraped around it it. This would make them very easy to reef by easing the outhaul and wrapping a few more turns around the mast. Small nails would make simple cleats. Possibly the main could be boomless? One less thing to make. Or even no booms at all, just encourage them to use twigs to pole them out downwind...

    If the hull is long and narrow I could use a cedar 4x2 for the hull, point the bow and stern, belt sand in a bit of rocker, and round the chines and it should perform pretty well and have better self steering characteristics than a wider hull.

    Rip a slot in the bottom for a pivoting stainless steel centreboard made from 25x3mm 304 flat bar. The same idea could be used for a skeg aft, but maybe one wouldn't be needed if the centreboard was able to be raked aft for downwind work?

    Any ideas or photo's of models your kids have enjoyed? Thoughts...

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    The tiny square rigged shoe boat.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    Some ideas here (could even get the kits)
    http://seaworthysmallships.com/our-products/

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    Thanks, I particularly like the little sea flea models. Very simple and cheap to make something like that.

    The footie class also has some useful information. It is amazing how techical those things are! But it seems like 4 or 5mm carbon tube would work fine for a mast.

    The newhaven sharpie or similar would make a good model for a this project. Simple hull shape, simple rig, and a long centreboard. Making the rig with two identical masts and sails makes a lot of sense as well, and it is nice if the model does have some rough historical accuracy.

    Making the hull from solid wood is limiting. I guess it will have to be Cedar (0.4 sg) or better yet Pawlonia (0.3 sg) to have any chance of being light enough to have a reasonable weight on the keel to give a reliable range of stability.

    With a Newhaven Sharpie the rudder could just be a skeg, simplifying things.

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    http://www.simplicityboats.com/ponds...html#Chameleon

    These are very close to what I had in mind.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    I think just about any Michaels or Hobby store has these little boat kits made by the company that makes the pine car derby kits for Cub Scouts. They're not quite "perfect" but I bought a few of them for a party where there were young kids in attendance. The kids were able to assemble them with a little assistance, and spent most of the morning playing with them. They come with rub-on decals for decoration in different themes. I think they're like $7 or $8. Good for a day's fun.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    No suggestions here but it's a great concept so I'm signing up to see what ideas come out of it. I would love something like this as well. Dash and I have made some of those wooden craft-style kits (a car and a train). They are fine for decoration or indoor play but I haven't seen anything that would actually sail. And Dash made his own boat at the Center for Wooden Boats this past summer and it floated in the model boat pond but again, not anything like actual sailing.
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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    I made a pretty good model 30'' long catamaran for my kids once , I bandsawed out 4 identical hull profiles from 4mm ply, wired them together along the "keel and backbone'' in pairs, propped the haves apart about 5 inches then used some 6 ounce cloth and epoxy to bond the halves. The decks were attached the same way.

    It roughly resembled a Wharram Nari.

    2 holes were drilled across the hull and 2 dowels were epoxied in .These were used to attach a solid wood "superstructure", 2 1/2'' x1/2'' cross beams and a mast step. 2 stiff rudders were attached aft, stiff so they would stay as set. They dowels protruded from the side of the hull about 3/4'' and were the base around which the rubber bands that held the superstructure on attached .

    The whole thing, though large assembled, broke down into small pieces to go in the car. It was successful and FAST!

    No photos unfortunately, it was many years ago.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    My vote is for a Marshalesse toy outrigger canoe - http://www.mit.edu/people/robot/mh/riwuit/index.html Link to plans can be found at the bottom of the page.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snow Pea View Post
    My four year old and his friends had enormous fun this weekend with a pond and a couple of boats made from a croc shoe and twigs. So I'd love to make a few workable toys for xmas to share around.

    Desirable features;

    A flat bottom and lifting keel so they can be used in shllow water or inside, As kids we had some fantastic model scows made by our grandfather (thanks Fred, you are the best!). They had traditional lifting centreboards made from steel and a dead flat bottom so we had endless fun making little harbours for them and towing them around the shallows, and they sat happily on the beach or our shelves.

    The boat must really sail and should be more or less self righting at least from a wind point of view, our scows were not fully self righting but had a reasonable range of stability and sailed very nicely.

    Adjustable sails with reefing capabilities are useful for stronger winds. The scows sails could be raised and lowered and being double headsail ketches they had lots of combinations for heavy weather (at least as for a 16 inch model) and they could be adjusted to self steer in a variety of wind angles. We had endless fun playing with different sail combinations and watching the boats battle across a pond through giant waves and ferocious gusts under shortened sail.

    Easy to build, because xmas is close and I haven't got much time. I'd plan on building half a dozen or so identical boats, so extreme simplicity is very desirable.

    Concepts

    An unstayed Cat ketch or Cat Yawl seems the simplest rig with good self steering capabilities. A couple of mast steps can be incorporated and a simple bermudian sail that rolls around the mast for reefing or stowage seems easiest to make. A bit of fibreglass tube for a mast and the sails could be simple hotknifed nylon with duck tape patches and they could be doublesided taped to the mast then wraped around it it. This would make them very easy to reef by easing the outhaul and wrapping a few more turns around the mast. Small nails would make simple cleats. Possibly the main could be boomless? One less thing to make. Or even no booms at all, just encourage them to use twigs to pole them out downwind...

    If the hull is long and narrow I could use a cedar 4x2 for the hull, point the bow and stern, belt sand in a bit of rocker, and round the chines and it should perform pretty well and have better self steering characteristics than a wider hull.

    Rip a slot in the bottom for a pivoting stainless steel centreboard made from 25x3mm 304 flat bar. The same idea could be used for a skeg aft, but maybe one wouldn't be needed if the centreboard was able to be raked aft for downwind work?

    Any ideas or photo's of models your kids have enjoyed? Thoughts...
    if you have a light wood that is best, My favorite here in Newengland is white pine.

    but you are also onto something with the foam crock, we have a blue or pink insulation foam sold here at our lumber/ home centers which shapes easily with a hand saw or sandpaper and can be painted with exterior grade latex or even Tight Bond 3 wood glue to make a nice light hull which allows for lots of ballast.

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    Some good ideas, thanks, Dan, the foam one could be a lot of fun when they are a bit older and can shape it themselves. Prehaps an experimental boat race with identical sails and foam blanks to start with. In this case gluing two foam sides onto a wooden backbone, that acts as a mast base, skeg, keel and bow would make it much stronger.

    At this stage I suspect they would quickly destroy a foam one unless I glassed it.

    I should have a look in the local model stores, though around here they seem to have either really crude cheap toys that wont sail well or beautful but expensive and fragile model yachts.

    I have some baltic pine 4x2 in the shed. Might have a play this weekend and see what I can come up with. At this stage I am trying to think of a simple way to hold the centreboard up or down. Maybe a friction setup with it bolted to one side of the centrecase on plastic would be easiest? Or prehaps just an old fashioned rope.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cracked lid View Post
    My vote is for a Marshalesse toy outrigger canoe - http://www.mit.edu/people/robot/mh/riwuit/index.html Link to plans can be found at the bottom of the page.
    That outrigger looks fantastic, probably a bit to fragile for this age group, but lots of fun, and serously fast. Thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    I made a pretty good model 30'' long catamaran for my kids once , I bandsawed out 4 identical hull profiles from 4mm ply, wired them together along the "keel and backbone'' in pairs, propped the haves apart about 5 inches then used some 6 ounce cloth and epoxy to bond the halves. The decks were attached the same way.

    It roughly resembled a Wharram Nari.

    2 holes were drilled across the hull and 2 dowels were epoxied in .These were used to attach a solid wood "superstructure", 2 1/2'' x1/2'' cross beams and a mast step. 2 stiff rudders were attached aft, stiff so they would stay as set. They dowels protruded from the side of the hull about 3/4'' and were the base around which the rubber bands that held the superstructure on attached .

    The whole thing, though large assembled, broke down into small pieces to go in the car. It was successful and FAST!

    No photos unfortunately, it was many years ago.
    Thanks Peter, I'd love a cat model at some point, not for this one though, far to complex for me to knock up in a hurry. How did you rig it? That seems like the only issue with a cat as it probably needs stays, unless you went for a biplane rig... maybe a trimaran would be simpler, as the centre hull can carry the masts and the keel?

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    Made a start on a prototype, all by eye and very very crude, which suits my wood butchery skills nicely.

    It floated, but even with fairly light baltic pine sg 0.45 or so there was not much freeboard. None with the overweight and over length keel on it.

    So either weight reduction or a lightweight freeboard extension, prehaps some foam?

    The keel will be cut down, probably in half, and a plywood or plastic skeg glued in the slot aft.

    I messed up the mast locations. Should have made her a yawl so the mizzen clears the centreboard. But I had already cut equal sized masts.

    Little fella enjoyed the float tests.

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    A quick play in the short window between getting back from work and dinner. I tried lightening the boat with holes drilled from above. This reduced the hull weight from 447 grams down to 388g, 49 grams total weight savings.

    Not spectacular, and probably not worth the effort, given the extra work glueing on a plywood deck to cover the holes. I guess I could shave more out but its all more work. Likely better to spend some money on lighter wood. Solid Cedar would be about the same weight as the drilled out Baltic Pine, and Paulownia much less.

    I cut the stainless centreboard down, now its 104 grams, so approximately a 20% ballast ratio and did a test run with the centreboard jammed in place. It was strongly self righting from past 100 degrees even with the keel mostly up. That is reassuring.

    Next I will sort out the centreboard so it can be raised and lowered, sand the hull and seal it, glue in the skeg and knock up some plastic bag sails to check hull balance. I suspect the centreboard may need to come aft and ultimately the rig may end up as a Schooner with a mainmast forward of the centreboard and a foremast well forward, but prehaps angled aft almost like a conventional sloop rig in profile. Alternatively a ketch or yawl with a very small mizzen as a balancing sail.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    It is almost impossible to make a solid wood model. The sad fact is that anything other than balsa is too heavy. Western red cedar @ 32 lbs/ft^3 is almost exactly half as heavy as water. So whatever hull you carve will be at best 1/2 underwater even before you ballast it. The ensuing low freeboard will cause the leeward gunwale to dip below the surface at very low angles of heel, causing the waterplane beam to disappear and erode stability even more.
    So you have to do something clever to get the weight out.
    I mis-spent my childhood building quick and dirty models of every boat I could imagine. I still prefer free sailing models to Radio Control. Foam is pretty useful in this regard. But is inherently fragile. More recently, I have shaped blue foam and coated it with epoxy which toughens it immensely. But that doesn't do wooden boat.
    I have glued veneer onto flat top sides and decks and shaped the underwater parts, which makes a very attractive hull which is quite durable.

    Get your hands on some 1/8" plywood and you can have a lot of fun with not much effort. Door skins aren't something you would use on a real boat, but is plenty good for quick model building. One favorite trick is to take a 3/4 " piece of western red cedar and cut out the waterplane. Use a bandsaw or your sabersaw at some bevel to give the hull some flare and then glue some 1/8 inch top sides and transom. The flare will make a straight top into an attractive shear line. You fillet the inside joints and you can bond a deck straight on top of the top sides. Now comes the fun part. You can shape the cedar with planes or sanders and come up with something that looks like it was much harder to do than it actually was.
    I will try to post some pictures. This thread has inspired me to try to sort out a 1/12 scale 110 hull. But it may be to light. Even using a high full size displacement (1500 lbs) scaled down, themodel has to weigh something like 12 ounces, which is tough to do. 24" models usually have to weigh more like 3 lbs to sail well. It can be solved by adding rocker and beam, but it stops being a 110 pretty quickly quickly, and I was kind of hoping I could make it work.
    SHC

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    On further consideration, as long as there is enough flotation to stop the model from sinking to the bottom, there is no reason the model can't be an open boat. It will swamp, so won't be able to cross big ponds, but saves the trouble of building something watertight.
    SHC

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    https://www.offcenterharbor.com/2015...e-harry-bryan/

    Harry Bryan's Quarter-Sized Skiff. Not within the parameters of the original post, but a great page for anyone interested in building a simple but elegant model. Includes plans, instructions and pretty pictures.

    (subscription site - moderators please remove this post if that's a problem or if it doesn't display)

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    Thanks SHC, some good ideas, and you are right about the difficulties of building a solid wood boat thay works well. Stability, and windward ability is always going to be compromised by the poor righting moment.

    But the advantages of a solid hull are also appealing. It doesn't get any simpler or stronger. A kid cannot destroy the hull even if they try, and deep scratches on the bottom are not an issue. Also attaching hardware is as easy as screwing or nailing something on.

    A few ideas to save weight and add righting moment are to glue on a thick soft foam deck, prehaps using this to cover any lightening holes, and if it was made to overhang the hull it would provide a fender of sorts. Usefull if sailing it around expensive yachts.

    Or another idea is to make a boat from two halves split at the waterline with a soft wood like paulonia for the topsides and deck portion and a denser harder wood underwater for abrasion resistance when dragged over rocks. The joint at the waterline would give and attractive look if oiled and the inside could be hollowed out slightly in some areas. This could work for me as I have some 25mn pauwlonia handy.

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    First thing though is to get a sail plan, mast location and keel arrangement that can enable the boat to steer itself reasonably well on a broad reach and yet still be able to make ground to windward if trimmed properly.

    I am hoping the combination of a swing centreboard and two masts will allow lots of room to adjust the course. And being able to reef the sails means it can handle strong winds, even though the righting moment is low.

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    One thing I vaguely remember reading a long time ago was that model boats need much more lateral plane than full size boats. Anybody know how much more and why? I am thinking my 25x3 keel may be too small. Prehaps a 50x1.6mm keel with much more lateral plane will work better? I guess there is only one way to find out, sea trials.

  22. #22

    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    I've made a few model boats that have just been 2x4's with the ends shaped. Bamboo stakes for the mast, skewers for the boom and umbrella fabric for the sail (superglue all of this together). A couple of bits of plywood screwed to the sides as leeboards finish it off. They sail well and don't capsize as easy as you'd think. And when they do capsize, just reel them in and set them off again, no problem.

    Also, catamaran.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdem View Post
    I've made a few model boats that have just been 2x4's with the ends shaped. Bamboo stakes for the mast, skewers for the boom and umbrella fabric for the sail (superglue all of this together). A couple of bits of plywood screwed to the sides as leeboards finish it off. They sail well and don't capsize as easy as you'd think. And when they do capsize, just reel them in and set them off again, no problem.

    Also, catamaran.
    Thats the kind of spirit I am after. I've thought that twin stainless steel leeboards would be a quick and dirty solution, and it would leave the centre free for mast locations in any position. The ballasted leeboards could be screwed unto the hull. Tighten the screws until they are a nice friction fit, and they should make the boat self righting if the size is right. Prehaps with a chunk of foam at the masthead to prevent complete inversion. The idea is that when the design is finalised a boat can be knocked out in a couple of hours or less. This suits the attention span of a 4 year old very well.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    IMG_0036.jpgFour piece skiff that lasted through 3 kids. The only curves are on the bottom. Top sides are straight taper. Flare determined by rake of stem. It seems I assembled it with hot melt glue and then coated it with epoxy. It couldn't have taken more than 30 minutes.
    It's certainly crude enough. Never saw a piece of sandpaper.

    A toy like this can sail, but isn't very seaworthy. But that can be fun.
    Certainly is good for puddles and playing the Wolf, Sheep and Cabbage game.
    Uncle Boat is on the case.
    Film @ 11
    SHC

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    Models need more draft than real boats because the need a long righting arm. It is always blowing really hard when you are that small. A little weight way down is better than lots of weight up close. The consequence of this is that the traditional long keel hulls look like they are all keel. Modern racing models have really deep narrow struts, which are as short chord as they can make them ( about 5x the thickness.)
    I grew up where it was quite windy, and my pond was tidal with a very muddy bottom. So deep models were kind of a problem. I used a lot of shifting ballast. There can be good news, if you put a few small rocks on the high side of a little light model, they can go very fast for a while. They will also tip over and the rocks will fall out, and you have to be patient until the model drifts ashore. Unless it gets it's rig stuck in the mud. Then you have to wade out, and get your boots stuck in the mud and come off, filled with water, and re- examine your life. Or you go commando, doff the footwear and cut your feet on razor clams and oyster shells. Mom always wanted to know why there was a pool of blood under my chair after lunch.
    Or you make the really dumb decision to throw rocks, thinking that the ripples will jar it lose or if you hit it just right, it will break free. Worse case is you hit it and break it. I couldn't throw a ball for ****,, but I could break a model boat mast with a rock...... gofigure.
    Anyway, quality entertainment for the young of all ages.
    SHC

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    My experience with toys for kids is that it's way too easy to design and build what you'd like rather than what a kid would like. And any kid worth the name will trash a fragile toy in no time.
    It's worth your time to ask who the boat is for, you or the kid? Been there...

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    IMG_0037.jpg
    Parts ready to assemble.
    Cedar bottom cut with 7 degree bevel for flare.
    Keep the offcuts for clamping the topsides.
    IMG_0038.jpg
    Glued together and interior coated.
    IMG_0042.jpg
    IMG_0043.jpg
    Sanded and sealed. Designed it and built it in about 4 hours.
    about 14" long. 4" wide.
    SHC

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    Looks great SHC, and very simple. using the offcuts as clamps is an excellent idea. Is this model going to have a deck? And I see what looks like a keel slot of some sort?

    I like the idea of a capsizable and loadable model like your first one. Teaches them the limits in a fun way. Kid will always see just what happens if you put a few more rocks in... I loved you description of wading out to the boat and slicing up you feet. It teaches seamanship without the same chance of drowning as overloading a real boat. The idea of using rocks as windward ballast is also a great one. I can see a few neat ideas along those lines. My little fella has a bit of a facination with anchors, so maybe a weight on a string can do double duty as an anchor and windward ballast. Thanks for your excellent posts and ideas.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Robb View Post
    My experience with toys for kids is that it's way too easy to design and build what you'd like rather than what a kid would like. And any kid worth the name will trash a fragile toy in no time.
    It's worth your time to ask who the boat is for, you or the kid? Been there...
    Absolutely the toy is for me. Yep, got to be clear about that, I am having fun thinking about it, building it, and hopefully I will have just as much fun reliving my childhood while playing with it. Just maybe the little fella will see me having loads of fun and want a turn. And if he is really nice to me I may even let him have a go!
    Last edited by Snow Pea; 12-03-2017 at 02:16 AM.

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    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    Tested it today. Very light wind. I took some pictures but can't access them right now. Went pretty well, a few tweaks necessary. But tweaking is what this is all about. A model should never be finished.
    Snow Pea, the idea is to have an open boat which floats with the top of the cedar just above the waterline.
    This should make the model self bailing through the centerboard trunk. This seems to work, but I think I need to add some scuppers to the stern.
    I made a little sprit rig out of 4mm dowels and a plastic bag. The rig has to be low and light because there isn't an awful lot of righting moment. The keel is about 200 mm deep with a #2 fishing sinker at the bottom. This is just enough to stand the boat upright after a knock down. So maybe it's an open model that self bails.
    If you had lighter wood, like balsa, for the thick bit, it could have more ballast and would sail better in stronger winds.
    I made the rudder a fixed skeg, you balance the boat for sailing up wind and down by sliding the keel fore and aft. I had some solid balsa models when I was a kid with this arrangement. They could plane just like a 250mm Laser.
    The keel can be pushed up so the model sits in a pretty low space.
    There are lots of reasons to do this stuff. For me, I decided I preferred free sailing because you have to row around after the model. I have a skiff my Grandfather built for my Dad the year I was born. I have no idea how many hours I have spent watching little boats sail from "Fred." Having a kid or two with me makes it more fun.
    The best game is to sail somewhere and back. You also learn how to row pretty well and handle a dinghy.
    Maybe the kids just want to play Nintendo, but you just need them keep you company. If you like building stuff, it won't matter if they break it, it means they are using it.
    SHC

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    Quote Originally Posted by SHClark View Post
    Tested it today. Very light wind. I took some pictures but can't access them right now. Went pretty well, a few tweaks necessary. But tweaking is what this is all about. A model should never be finished.
    Snow Pea, the idea is to have an open boat which floats with the top of the cedar just above the waterline.
    This should make the model self bailing through the centerboard trunk. This seems to work, but I think I need to add some scuppers to the stern.
    I made a little sprit rig out of 4mm dowels and a plastic bag. The rig has to be low and light because there isn't an awful lot of righting moment. The keel is about 200 mm deep with a #2 fishing sinker at the bottom. This is just enough to stand the boat upright after a knock down. So maybe it's an open model that self bails.
    If you had lighter wood, like balsa, for the thick bit, it could have more ballast and would sail better in stronger winds.
    I made the rudder a fixed skeg, you balance the boat for sailing up wind and down by sliding the keel fore and aft. I had some solid balsa models when I was a kid with this arrangement. They could plane just like a 250mm Laser.
    The keel can be pushed up so the model sits in a pretty low space.
    There are lots of reasons to do this stuff. For me, I decided I preferred free sailing because you have to row around after the model. I have a skiff my Grandfather built for my Dad the year I was born. I have no idea how many hours I have spent watching little boats sail from "Fred." Having a kid or two with me makes it more fun.
    The best game is to sail somewhere and back. You also learn how to row pretty well and handle a dinghy.
    Maybe the kids just want to play Nintendo, but you just need them keep you company. If you like building stuff, it won't matter if they break it, it means they are using it.
    SHC
    I am very keen to see sailing photo's. Sounds like a perfect simple model, and the sliding keel is an elegant solution. How does it self steer with just the one sail?

  32. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in South Central PA
    Posts
    3,373

    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    Here is one I have made four copies of, so far. The hull is 4 mm plywood and 22 inches long. It is built stitch and glue (no glass). The sails are poly/cotton sheet fabric with iron-on seam tape folded over the edges. The keel is a piece of sheet metal with lead attached on either side and encapsulated in knitted T-shirt fabric and epoxy. It sails like a witch.


  33. #33
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Narragansett Bay and Approaches
    Posts
    134

    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    IMG_0047.jpg
    Completed. Hull. 172g
    Keel 75g
    Spars and sail 9g
    Blue Meanie not included.

    IMG_0052.jpg....

    Not much wind but it sails, didn't make it against the tide, but when you are this small.
    SHC

  34. #34
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Location
    Tasmania, Australia
    Posts
    118

    Default

    Great photos SHC, thanks. The little sprit sail is very neat. What sort of tape did you use to reinforce the edges?

    It's been a wet weekend here. Great weather for ducks but not for boatbuilding outside, or sailing, so no progress on my side.

  35. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Narragansett Bay and Approaches
    Posts
    134

    Default Re: A very simple small kids model boat?

    Plastic packaging tape. I applied it oversized and trimmed with a single edge razor blade.
    i had some spectra fishing line, which makes good loops and lashings if you put superglue on it.
    corners got a ply each side and a hole cut with a soldering iron.
    On small models, you have to avoid cloth that absorbs water, because once the sails get wet the extra weight aloft can just make the boat unusable unstable.
    I have to sharpen the leading edge of the keel, it stalls a bit too easily.
    None of this is prescriptive. I usually just spitball with what I have lying around, and then mess with it until it works. I think the boat could profit from more beam, but the only bit of redwood was only 100 mm wide.
    you can add half decks and not bother to make the model watertight as long as the " double bottom" is just above the waterline.
    Get to work.
    SHC

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