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Thread: Building a Hvalsoe-13

  1. #71
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Looking good, Jeff. Well done!
    Ian
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  2. #72
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I'm really surprised that more people don't use the Tom Hill method that I've used on all my glued lap boats. The planks are clamped to ribbands rather then screwed temporarily to the molds. All my boats didn't have a single screw hole to fill other then the stem and stern. Saves a lot of time and aggravation. Of all the glued lap boats seen on this Forum, I seem to be the only one to use that screwless method. The only down side is that you need a zillion clamps and are limited to a plank per side per day.
    The problem with screws is a possible hard spot in the final finish.

    One doesn't need to use the Tom Hill method to avoid using screws, I could have done it by simply substituting a clamp wherever I put in a screw. But in the end I went with what I did before. And I didn't have to make or buy a bunch of deep clamps.

    Filling and then smoothing at all the screw holes is a bit of a bother but it's mindless. Gives me time to relax and feel good about doing something that I know is correct. So many parts of the build are otherwise. It's nice to have a mental rest.

    Jeff
    Last edited by jpatrick; 02-08-2018 at 08:35 PM. Reason: corrected spelling

  3. #73
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    One doesn't need to use the Tom Hill method to ovoid using screws, I could have done it by simply substituting a clamp wherever I put in a screw. But in the end I went with what I did before. And I didn't have to make or buy a bunch of deep clamps.

    Filling and then smoothing at all the screw holes is a bit of a bother but it's mindless. Gives me time to relax and feel good about doing something that I know is correct. So many parts of the build are otherwise. It's nice to have a mental rest.

    Jeff
    There is that! Doing all the complex woodwork and then being able to do something mindless for a while is a joy.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  4. #74
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    Of all the glued lap boats seen on this Forum, I seem to be the only one to use that screwless method.
    Not so, Rich. I built both Hornpipe and Fire-Drake this way. Only screws were in the plank ends.
    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  5. #75
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    . . . looks nice
    Last edited by Eric Hvalsoe; 02-08-2018 at 07:57 PM.

  6. #76
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Some more progress.... I've been scraping and filling on the hull interior. That's just about done and today I can commence sanding the filler. In the meantime I've been thinking about the flotation chambers in bow and stern. As I mentioned before, I'm essentially building the boat for one occupant and it's for rowing only. So no need for the side seats, nor for centerboard trunk.

    But I will build the chambers stout enough for someone to sit or stand on them. I'm trying to keep weight to a minimum but I'm not going to be fanatical about it. If I'd wanted a super lightweight boat, I'd have chosen a different design.

    Here's the template for the stern chamber bulkhead:

    Flotation, stern.jpg

    And, then full size mockups in cardboard:

    Flotation mockup.jpg

    The chambers will be built of 6mm ply and douglas fir interior supports. I will fit a 8" watertight access hatch to each one. That will allow me a secure dry place to put my lunch and some spare line, etc. I'm thinking of using the hatches from Duckworks:

    Deckplate.jpg

    Does anyone know of any reason these wouldn't work? I've not laid hands on one but I believe these guys are reputable in their offerings.

    I will likely cover these "decks" with some dynel that I happen to have.

    .... And while I'm asking for opinions... Duckworks have these rowlocks for sale:

    Buck Algonquin oarlocks.jpg

    They are bronze, made by Buck Algonquin. Again, I've little experience in choosing and using open top oarlocks. Are these a good choice? Others?

    Thanks & Onward....

    Jeff

  7. #77
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    A thought on your mock up - perhaps tilt the aft bulkhead back a wee bit - imagine stretching out on the floorboards with your feet up on the thwart and a comfortable backrest. I do this with the help of a beach chair on the 16 a lot. Maybe that works out on your boat too, or not.

    Access ports look fine if they are big enough for what you want.

    Oarlocks look pretty nice although it is hard to see how true the shaft is finished off. I have used a slightly different pattern - wilcox critenden #1, mated to Barkley Sound 8' spoon oars, purchased through Fisheries Supply. The w/c is merely a pattern that has made its way to different foundries (probably as is the buck algonquin). Quality of the same pattern from different sources can vary considerably. I've seen two of the same pattern on the shelf at Fisheries from different sources and clearly preferred one over the other - However I can't remember which was which! Sorry about that. What I have carries the w/c stamp. The w/c horn pattern is a bit more oval. As I recall the shaft of the Barkley Sound oars are 1 3/4", to which you are adding the leathers.

    Usually I have the luxury of eyes on the product when it comes to oarlocks. What you have there might be dandy, I've just not used them. Some folks prefer the lanyard attachment on the horn itself as your picture shows. I've always been fine attaching to the base of the shaft.

    One product I've found to be consistent are the bronze top mount oarlock sockets from, oddly, Perko. For 1/2" shaft. I would want 1/2" shaft on those Buck's.
    Eric

  8. #78
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    Default

    Jeff, you don’t say which oars you are planning to use or whether, perhaps, you are building your own. I much prefer to decide on oars first then find oarlocks to fit them rather than the other way round. Barkley Sound for example carry good bronze oarlocks to fit al the oars they sell.


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    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

  9. #79
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Or cast your own after building the oars!

    Looking good!
    "near it, a small whale-boat, painted red and blue, the delight of the king's old age."

  10. #80
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    I'm planning on making my own oars using Culler's design/plans. They will be flat blades, not spoons. Probably 8' long or thereabouts. Culler's plan is vague on loom diameter. He calls out dimensions at the neck, near the blade and again above the round part of the loom that will be covered in leather. That is 2 1/4" which carries out through the square part to the grip. All of the rowlocks I've been finding are for 2" oar diameter. After subtracting leather, the wood is the limited to about 1 3/4", like the Barkley Sound oars that Eric mentioned. By the way, prices for bronze rowlocks vary considerably among the makers. Some are quite proud of their products.

    Right now I'm leaning toward those on the Duck Trap site. I've seen good reviews on them and they appear to have a well machined spindle. Their price is acceptable too. But, the Culler oar will then have to be scaled down to fit. Probably not a disaster as long as I use good wood. I'm planning on clear VG Douglas Fir. Edensaw has a good supply of that.

    Whatever I choose in the way of oars will likely be the first set with variations to follow. Making a pair of oars is a nice small project that can always be fun to do.

    I don't want to mess with having to cast a set of rowlocks right now. Maybe later..

    Thanks all.
    Jeff

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    On my Hvalsoe 13, I use a pair of bronze oarlocks I already had with a 1/2" shaft.
    The bronze oarlock sockets are from West Marine and have nylon bushings which are nice and quiet. Without them, you're likely to get that creak-clunk-creak-clunk sound as you row. They sell replacement bushing if you wear them out.
    Those floatation tanks are nice. I get a little nervous when I'm going through a puff and the lee rail is an inch from the water!
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

  12. #82
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    I've been making some progress....

    The interior of the hull is about ready for the interior structures and paint. It needs another sanding and some spot filling as well as a good clean out. The hull offers a convenient place to put clamps, tools, and assorted bits of wood. When planking the upturned hull the keel/garboard offered a table of sorts. Well, now that it's sitting properly, it's all a big bucket. People come into my shop and see orderliness but all I experience is chaos, I think.

    The bow and stern tanks have been on standby while waiting for the deck plates to arrive. But yesterday I did get them in. It will be good to finish that part. I got the 8" jobbies:

    Deckplate 1.jpg

    While waiting for those, I worked on the upper edge of the shear plank. Being plywood is a bother when one desires a bright finish. I'm sort of a stickler when it comes to details such as this. So the only thing to do was to apply a solid wood edging to match the inwale/outwale. But first, I applied a thick veneer to the upper portion of the shear plank interior. This wood will also get a coating of varnish, whereas below will be painted. I figure this arrangement will ease my varnishing duties considerably. The veneer being applied:

    Shear trim 1.jpg

    And then it's cap. A stick of wood that measured about 1/2" wide by 5/16" thick before trimming:

    Shear trim 2.jpg

    Needless to say, I'm glad I have a lot of clamps. Still, I had to do the each side in turn.

    After that plank cap (don't know what else to call it) was installed and trimmed flush, I was able to cut the transom curve. That went well, so I also did the stem. Both still need finish sanding and a little detail work.

    Transom & Stem shaping.jpg

    Last thing done yesterday was to prepare some stock for the breasthook. I chose to use some black locust that I happen to have. This wood was harvested locally. I think it will visually complement the doug fir I'm using elsewhere.

    Breasthook 1.jpg

    The center seam is glued with epoxy that was slightly thickened with wood flour. Fitting it snugly into the bow will be an interesting exercise in jointing. More fun!

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    If it were my boat I think I would have two or three cross spalls to maintain the designer's intended beam.If the unconstrained hull should spread there is a good chance the rocker will increase and the performance may be adversely affected.A centre mark on each will also help with checking symmetry.

  14. #84
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by John Meachen View Post
    If it were my boat I think I would have two or three cross spalls to maintain the designer's intended beam.If the unconstrained hull should spread there is a good chance the rocker will increase and the performance may be adversely affected.A centre mark on each will also help with checking symmetry.

    Eric specs the width at Sta. 8 to be 4'-6". I think I got it, although I will admit I didn't bother to check symmetry:

    Shear measurmet, sta. 8.jpg

    Glued lap boats tend to hold their form fairly well.

    Jeff

  15. #85
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    The way this thing is glued up not much is likely to happen to the rocker. If the beam relaxes outward a wee bit, no matter. I would be less enthusiastic about contraction.
    Of course a cross spall or two is often not a bad idea.

    The typical Hvalsoe breasthook is not fit snug into the corner of the stem. It is set back a little bit with a pleasing arc, beveled somewhat parallel to the stem, that complements the inboard breasthook radius. I usually think in terms of ribs and inwales (or spacers and inwales). Lot of interesting fitting, gotta think a few steps ahead.

  16. #86
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hvalsoe View Post

    The typical Hvalsoe breasthook is not fit snug into the corner of the stem. It is set back a little bit with a pleasing arc, beveled somewhat parallel to the stem, that complements the inboard breasthook radius. I usually think in terms of ribs and inwales (or spacers and inwales). Lot of interesting fitting, gotta think a few steps ahead.

    Good to read your comments here, Eric. I am, of course, following the lead of prior Hvalsoe's: yours, Rich's, Tim's... However in just looking at internet photos I wasn't aware of the slight bevel to complement the stem. I'll keep that in mind... perhaps I would have anyway as I progressed to finishing it. Something I'm unsure of is the actual size of the breasthook. Your drawings don't specify so I simply scaled then added a bit to be conservative. Can you give me some guidance here? Is there a minimum that ought to be achieved? The fitting will be an interesting geometry. Less so than if you wanted a close fit up into the stem.

    Did I get the transom curve ok? I sure hope so. Can't put any back now. If it's too short I can always hang an outboard motor on there to cover it up!


    Jeff

  17. #87
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    I'm planning on making my own oars using Culler's design/plans. They will be flat blades, not spoons. Probably 8' long or thereabouts. Culler's plan is vague on loom diameter. He calls out dimensions at the neck, near the blade and again above the round part of the loom that will be covered in leather. That is 2 1/4" which carries out through the square part to the grip. All of the rowlocks I've been finding are for 2" oar diameter. After subtracting leather, the wood is the limited to about 1 3/4", like the Barkley Sound oars that Eric mentioned. By the way, prices for bronze rowlocks vary considerably among the makers. Some are quite proud of their products.
    I'm enjoying your build and I might have some useful info to share since our beams are almost identical. Don designed two sets of Culler-style oars specifically for his Alaska. The longer set at 8'8" is a bit longer than you're thinking about but close enough to give you a starting point. The loom at the pivot point is 1 7/8" allowing for an extra 1/4" for the leathers. The oarlocks I have are 2 1/8" ID - I don't know whether that's a Wilcox Crittenden No.1 or not - there is no number stamped on mine.

    The loom tapers from 1 7/8" down to an oval 1 1/2" by 1".

    36130013.jpg

    Alaska's oarlock.jpg

    12 years later...

  18. #88
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by darroch View Post
    I'm enjoying your build and I might have some useful info to share since our beams are almost identical. Don designed two sets of Culler-style oars specifically for his Alaska. The longer set at 8'8" is a bit longer than you're thinking about but close enough to give you a starting point. The loom at the pivot point is 1 7/8" allowing for an extra 1/4" for the leathers. The oarlocks I have are 2 1/8" ID - I don't know whether that's a Wilcox Crittenden No.1 or not - there is no number stamped on mine.

    The loom tapers from 1 7/8" down to an oval 1 1/2" by 1".

    36130013.jpg

    Alaska's oarlock.jpg

    12 years later...
    Yep that's the w/c #1 pattern.

  19. #89
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by jpatrick View Post
    Good to read your comments here, Eric. I am, of course, following the lead of prior Hvalsoe's: yours, Rich's, Tim's... However in just looking at internet photos I wasn't aware of the slight bevel to complement the stem. I'll keep that in mind... perhaps I would have anyway as I progressed to finishing it. Something I'm unsure of is the actual size of the breasthook. Your drawings don't specify so I simply scaled then added a bit to be conservative. Can you give me some guidance here? Is there a minimum that ought to be achieved? The fitting will be an interesting geometry. Less so than if you wanted a close fit up into the stem.

    Did I get the transom curve ok? I sure hope so. Can't put any back now. If it's too short I can always hang an outboard motor on there to cover it up!


    Jeff
    Transom looks great.
    Hard to explain this stuff like breasthooks without pictures. I have retrogressed in terms of posting pictures, just awful. Useful images are on my flickr photostream, although it is not well organized.

    Just looked at my 16. The leg of the breasthook is about 8"- that is along the plank. The forward face of the 'hook stands back from the stem about 3/4", in the from of a forward sweeping arc, underbeveled somewhat parallel to the stem. Has the visual effect of nicely framing and accenting the stem. Avoids a tiresome bit of fitting, awkward sharp corners where finishes tend to fail, and gives you something (the breasthook itself) to lasso with a line. Epoxy carpentry makes the second point less critical I suppose.

    My breasthook is notched to receive the inwales, about 1 1/2". The inboard face of the 'hook presents an arc from port to starboard, fair and flush with the inwales. That is going to be a standing bevel cut on your band saw. That is what you would see in a picture.

    As far as the sequence - grossly breezing through it -
    *simple pattern at sheer, general footprint of breasthook inside of plank, note bevels to sheer plank, strike an arc forward
    *Glue up oversize breasthook blank
    *apply pattern to top of blank (a little tricky if you have glued your blank up with some camber lalready)
    *cut the blank square to the pattern line. Yah, I said square.
    *the blank sits a bit above the sheer for added camber, now draw the actual sheer line along the sides of the blank
    *NOW cut the side bevel to the sheer height on the blank
    *square off the back ends of the blank, figure out the landing and notches of the inwale, plot a nice arc from one side to the othebr />
    something like that
    Last edited by Eric Hvalsoe; 03-02-2018 at 09:06 AM.

  20. #90
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric Hvalsoe View Post
    *the blank sits a bit above the sheer for added camber, now draw the actual sheer line along the sides of the blank
    *NOW cut the side bevel to the sheer height on the blank

    I've never thought about this step in exactly this way. Good info. Adherence on my part, could play a significant factor in having to make a second attempt or not.

    Re: darroch's oarlocks: I am not certain enough to bet money on it, but I think those are W/C pattern #2, not #1. The #1's are too small to take those oars. Ebay is chockablock full of good deals on the 1's. Not so much choice on the 2's. I finally decided on and bought some nice oarlocks from RW Rope. They are the spittin image of the W/C's. Very nicely made. I bet they'll sink like a rock so I'll be sure to tie them in!

    Not so much work on the boat yesterday. Chris and I went shopping for other stuff to the megamall over on Kitsap. Weird to get off the island for a change.

    Jeff

  21. #91
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Well it's been over a month since I last posted. The thread was buried back on page 6 or 7. I'll try to keep up....

    Fitting the breasthook and quarter knees was time consuming but not too difficult. I used a few patterns that were scribed off the hull, some carbon paper to reveal the high spots, and a lot of patience. But finally they got to the place where I was satisfied.

    Breasthook, rough.jpg

    I also wanted to complete the bow and stern floatation chambers before installing the corners. These are a pretty straightforward build: A few deck beams epoxied to the hull and a supporting edge also epoxied onto the hull. The deck is 6mm ply amply sealed with neat epoxy. I was going to put some dyneema cloth on these decks but finally decided it wasn't necessary. I can achieve an airtight chamber without it and the decks are really for sitting only, not standing. So I don't need a non-slip wear resistant surface. Here's the stern chamber:

    Flotation tank in the stern.jpg

    Than I turned my attention to the rowing thwart and sole. Not knowing exactly where to put it, I checked in with Eric and, of course, he was immensely helpful. I also reviewed my building guide, John Brooks' book on glued lap boats. John has found that half frames serve the purpose of holding the rowing thwart better than do stringers along the hull. So I cobbled something up and installed them. My actual thwart is made from some doug fir we had cut from our property a few years ago. It doesn't exactly match the rest of the fir in the boat, but I don't care.

    The thwart:

    Rowing thwart & sole.jpg

    Those with sharp eyes and who haven't fallen asleep will also note the new sole. This is from some clear western red cedar left over from a house project. It was in a batch of tight-knot but would have looked out of place on our porch. So to the boat it went!

    More coming.....

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Continuing the catch-up.....

    After getting the thwart and sole taken care of, I finally (it seemed) started in on the gunwale. Here's the outwale being glued:

    Outwale clamping.jpg

    Lot's of clamps of course. I chose to do the outwale as a lamination since it's final thickness seemed too stiff to bend on cold. No big deal, it just took a little more epoxy. I think, the ease of bending it more than made up for the additional work.

    After the outwales, I got out the breasthook and quarter knees that I had put aside. Unfortunately, the outwales had tweaked the shear just enough to throw off the close fit I'd achieved. Curses! So it was back to the sanding machine and shortly all was well again. The installation of the inwales was pretty straightforward but it took a few back and forths from boat to chop saw to dial in the fit. Gunwales are now in place and the breasthook/quarter knees are shaped:

    Gunwales installed.jpg

    There's still plenty of rounding and sanding to do on the gunwales as well as many other parts. But today I got another item checked off the list.... rowlock socket pads:

    Oarlock socket pad.jpg

    Because... I will be rowing this boat. And to that end, I've been working on the oars whenever I have extra time or just need "something else to do."

    Oar shaping 1.jpg

    Oar shaping 2.jpg

    That pretty much brings us up to the present. The boat is very much along now. I forsee beginning painting as early as next week. Unless I varnish first....

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Today was spent doing a lot of trimming, shaping, and sanding. Oh the sanding. I've no fingernails left...

    One of my tasks today was to trim the outwale at the transom. It needed just a bit of "lightening." So I sprung a batten and marked out a fair line to plane to:

    Trimming the outwale.jpg

    Then out came the old #78 rabbet plane to make short work of this. Not a lot of material needed to be removed which was a good thing. I was working from my knees to be in the best position. This old bod doesn't particularly like that. Anyway, the trim job was a success, giving a bit of a visual lift at the stern.

    Then, after much use of my trim router and various pieces of sandpaper, the brightwork is ready for varnish:

    Ready to varnish.jpg

    Tomorrow will be spent sanding the interior of the hull to get it ready for paint. Not much to do actually since it's been hit once already. Mainly I need to go over things carefully trying to catch all the little sloppy spots. I'll also need to do a good cleanup of the shop before I get out the varnish.



    Jeff

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    Default

    Looking good Jeff. If the decks have strong enough underpinnings Kiwi Grip makes a good non-skid surface to stand on.


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    Alex

    "A man who is not afraid of the sea will soon be drowned, for he will be going out on a day he shouldn't. We do be afraid of the sea, and we only be drowned now and again" Aran Islands Fisherman

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Coming up very well, Jeff. That's a nice touch with the outwale.
    Ian
    “Old Joke: ‘A bench fitter works to the nearest thousandth of an inch. A loco fitter (steam) works to the nearest inch. A shipwright works to the nearest ship’.”
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    “...old maxim, 'A fair line supersedes any given measurement'.”
    Allan H. Vaitses, Lofting, International Marine, 1980

  26. #96
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by AJZimm View Post
    Looking good Jeff. If the decks have strong enough underpinnings Kiwi Grip makes a good non-skid surface to stand on.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

    Yes, I'm aware of Kiwi Grip, Alex. But those are decks only because I don't know what else to call them. I don't believe I have the balance necessary to stand on them no matter what their surface. Remember, there are no masts to hang onto.

    Coming up very well, Jeff. That's a nice touch with the outwale.
    Ian
    Thank you, Ian. It's quite a subtle detail. I doubt that anyone would ever be aware that I did it by simple observation. But the change in appearance is there.

    Jeff

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    I like the idea of the half ribs to support the thwart risers. Wish I'd done that.
    Also, the little swoop you put in the sloping sides of the oarlock risers is nice. Better then just a straight line. It's the little details that add so much to a nice boat like this.
    I was born on a wooden boat that I built myself.

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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    And by the way, a Happy Birthday to Mr. Eric.

  29. #99
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Portland, Oregon
    Posts
    45,541

    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by pcford View Post
    And by the way, a Happy Birthday to Mr. Eric.
    Indeed... that lying devil. He claims to have reached 60. But I think maybe he was influenced by McMullen in the Tall Tales dept. He SURE don't look that old, and I know for a fact that the boatbuilding biz is one that ages you before your time, and can even warp your brain. I mean... heck... look what it did to you!! Your brain was arrested before it even realized the importance of a good Shop Apron!!

    Seriously -- as I said earlier, Eric, this is a big one. Hope you celebrate it well!!!
    Last edited by David G; 04-17-2018 at 10:37 PM.
    David G
    Harbor Woodworks
    http://www.harborwoodworking.com/boat.html

    "It was a Sunday morning and Goddard gave thanks that there were still places where one could worship in temples not made by human hands." -- L. F. Herreshoff (The Compleat Cruiser)

  30. #100
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    PNW, an island west of Seattle
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Damn! The plans didn't mention a thing about today being Eric's B-Day. Maybe I'll carve it into the keel.

    Happy day, Eric.

    Jeff

  31. #101
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    PNW, an island west of Seattle
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich Jones View Post
    I like the idea of the half ribs to support the thwart risers. Wish I'd done that.
    Also, the little swoop you put in the sloping sides of the oarlock risers is nice. Better then just a straight line. It's the little details that add so much to a nice boat like this.

    Rich, I admit to being detail obsessed. Perhaps overly so. The risers are also curved along their length to match the curve of the shear.

    Jeff

  32. #102
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
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    PNW, an island west of Seattle
    Posts
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    Default Re: Building a Hvalsoe-13

    Got some more done today. No, it's not painting....

    First I want to share the view I have of the boat from my shop chair. I spend time here off and on through the day. It helps to get the weight off my feet every now and then. You young guys will find out what I mean a few years down the road. Anyway, since I sit here, it's nice to have a good view:

    Chair view.jpg

    Yesterday afternoon I turned the boat over to gain access to the bottom. I knew that there were still some areas that needed fairing and filling. So out came the rope hoists and .......

    Turning over.jpg

    This is surprisingly an easy way to flip the boat by myself. Of course it helps that she's pretty lightweight. How light? Or, rather, how heavy? Once turned over and supported by benches it was easy to put a scale on the bow end. I had the stern bench almost at the transom so I'm pretty sure I was measuring about half of the boat. Fifty pounds said the scale. This surprised me as I thought she'd be heavier. So taking both end weights together and guestimating at the interior pieces I still need to attach, I'm thinking she'll be less than 130. That's a good thing for beach launching. I'm happy.

    Once turned over I was again reminded that I want to attach garboard guards at her beam. Most of the wear on the beach will be to the keel shoe but I want to minimize peripheral damage to the hull. So I added these port and starboard:

    Garboard guards.jpg

    These strips are douglas fir but they'll be capped with some thin Ipe that I have. If the Ipe doesn't last long, I'll use some uhmw later.

    Lastly, today I continued to shape the oars:

    Oar 4.jpg

    That one is just about done. There's still some sanding to do on the blade. And, I'm uncertain about the grip. Right now it's a tiny tad over 1 1/2" diameter. That is a recommended size in some places but when I look at it, it seems visually large. My hand seems to grip it OK but a shop test isn't the same as actual use. I'd be interested in hearing what other's have on their oars. I know I can always make it smaller so that will be my approach in the beginning. But it would be nice to hear from you die-hard rowers.

    Thanks for looking...

    Jeff

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