Results 1 to 17 of 17

Thread: H-28 on C-List

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Somewhere in South Central PA
    Posts
    3,373

    Default H-28 on C-List


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    10,689

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Lovely H28! Without the toe rail/bullwork the boat looks sleeker than ours as seen here.
    Jay

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    New jersey
    Posts
    2,503

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    I’m strictly a SOF kayak guy. I saw the CL the other day and was wondering if that method of recladding is common.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    Gone West!
    Posts
    1,327

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Quote Originally Posted by Boater14 View Post
    I’m strictly a SOF kayak guy. I saw the CL the other day and was wondering if that method of recladding is common.
    I'm not sure I'd say it's "common," but I think it's a pretty well regarded method. I believe using veneers rather than plywood might be more prevalent. There was an extensive article in WB some years back featuring the Carr's "Curlew."

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    South Australia and Tasmania
    Posts
    12,261

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Probably sound. But I suspect it will make her difficult to sell.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2017
    Location
    Decatur, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    182

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Quote Originally Posted by Phil Y View Post
    Probably sound. But I suspect it will make her difficult to sell.
    That could be, considering that there may be a market for a boat that would be restorable by traditional means, but I remember an article in WoodenBoat Magazine, many years back, of a classic racing yacht that was not economically feasible to restore, then, using traditional methods, and was redone in exactly the way that this boat was done.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    64,402

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List



    1951/2013 L. FRANCIS HERRESHOFF H-28 "HOLIDAY" $29,000 - (USA)
    The H-28's came off the board of L. Francis Herreshoff, who designed beautiful artistic boats. "HOLIDAY" is one of the prettiest H-28's I've ever seen. In 2013 a new cold molded hull of 6mm mahogany plywood @ 45 degree angles, bedded in West System Epoxy, overlaid w/ fiberglass was put over the existing hull of solid mahogany. The result is an incredibly solid hull that is now lighter than her original hull because she is dry, no water saturation into her hull. Check out her pictures & see what you think.

    From reading that is an excellent rebuilding and strengthening method .If other disagree I'd love to hear their reasons .
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wongawallan Oz
    Posts
    15,086

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Holliday has been for sale for quite a while now and, along with Bright Star and Lark, has been an inspiration for my own H28 rebuild. The cladding method has been written up in a number of magazines and industry articles over the years and is actually reasonably common, at least according a boat builder who had the shed a couple up from us and who did quite a few of them himself.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    South Puget Sound/summer Eastern carib./winter
    Posts
    13,546

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    I just would not sheath a boat with plywood. Seems daft. So simple to mill your own lams .Straight from the table saw to the boat with thin rips from solid wood.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Port Townsend WA
    Posts
    10,689

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    In truth, I am allergic to the glues used to bond plywood and avoid using it more than I avoid breathing battery acid fumes!
    Jay

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wongawallan Oz
    Posts
    15,086

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Quote Originally Posted by wizbang 13 View Post
    I just would not sheath a boat with plywood. Seems daft. So simple to mill your own lams .Straight from the table saw to the boat with thin rips from solid wood.
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Greer View Post
    In truth, I am allergic to the glues used to bond plywood and avoid using it more than I avoid breathing battery acid fumes!
    Jay

    I meant to say that the boat builder that I mentioned didn’t use ply, he used cedar laminates as you suggest Bruce.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    21,861

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    I'm still waiting for my next issue of WoodenBoat. The front page of the WoodenBoat web page seems to show an H-28 with sloop rig. Was this an option? I confess I think it looks better. I'm hoping the magazine will clarify this when it comes.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wongawallan Oz
    Posts
    15,086

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Quote Originally Posted by CWSmith View Post
    I'm still waiting for my next issue of WoodenBoat. The front page of the WoodenBoat web page seems to show an H-28 with sloop rig. Was this an option? I confess I think it looks better. I'm hoping the magazine will clarify this when it comes.
    Indeed it was/is. LFH produced drawings for the sloop rig - which I have a copy of.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb 2000
    Location
    San Francisco Bay
    Posts
    11,350

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    The question that arises is "Why?" Why was this hull sheathed? If planks were bad, why didn't they just replace the planks?

    In my experience, this sort of sheathing is done as a quick and dirty repair in the hope of stabilizing a framing structure with little or no hope of holding itself together. Frequently it's the floors which have gone bad or the frames have been cracked beyond usefulness. Nobody goes to the length they have on this nicely appearing boat, cold molding a plywood (!) sheathing and then covering it with fiberglass and fairing all that when the job could be done by refastening and replacing planks.

    There's a story to this boat that they aren't telling.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    21,325

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    As the owner of a boat that was sheathed, I'll toss out some personal thoughts. Not claiming I'm an expert! The sheathing did not use wood; it was approx. 1/4' of glass & epoxy - min. 4 layers of cloth.

    If you are keeping the boat in an area that gets below freezing temps - don't do it. I missed some water in the bilge near the horn timber & discovered (come February) a crack in the horn timber large enough for my to reach into the hull & touch the prop shaft. Water had frozen, cracked the timber, then we got a thaw & the water mostly ran out.

    When I removed the epoxy (256 8" 16 grit disks!), I found most all the previously covered AYC planks to be junk. The same age planks on the topsides (also AYC) are in beautiful shape. All the covered ones were punky, stringy & made me gasp when I saw how shot they were. The sheathing had been on roughly 10 years & I've been told (though I didn't see it) that the bottom planks were in as good shape as the topsides.

    I personally would not ever sheath a boat unless it was a junker that I wanted another couple of years from.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Location
    Sound Beach, NY
    Posts
    3,214

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    Interesting. In 1991 I bought a 20' sloop that had been built in 1961, fiberglass sheathed in the mid 70s. That boat had been covered over all, decks, cabin, hull, everything except the iron keel. I sailed her for eight years, often summer and winter. She was quite sound and would still be in service if the next owner had not left her in a yard, uncovered, to fill with rain and leaves.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Wongawallan Oz
    Posts
    15,086

    Default Re: H-28 on C-List

    ‘Not suggesting it may be the case with this H28, but not all boats are sheathed because the hull planking is rotten. It has been suggested to me a number of times that I should sheathe my perfectly sound strip planked huon pine hull to resolve any possible further issues with glue line failures and to reduce maintenance in the future.

    ALSO, I followed closely a hull sheathing project by the fellow I mentioned in a post above of a Douglas Fir/Oregon timbered hull that was in beautifully sound condition and which the owner had sailed for the past 30 years or so.

    He had previously sheathed above the water line because of the Australian weather and planking opening up and said he was very happy that he’d done that, about five years prior.

    He had then decided to sheathe the rest of the hull because changing environmental laws (along with his age/physicality) means that every time he hauls the boat now for anti-fouling the boat yards have to clean the hull and they use high pressure water-jets that strip out the caulking and gradually sort of shave back the softer wood in the planking around the grain. A bit hard to explain but I could see what he meant when I had a closer look, where it was quite clear that the harder/darker grain of the timber was slightly raised above the majority of the timber surrounding it. That’s not to say there was anything wrong with the timber itself, it just showed how much damage the water jet wash downs were doing to the hull.

    The owner at the time was probably in his late 60’s/early 70’s and wants this boat to see him out, but without having to worry more and more about maintenance and wear on an otherwise sound hull as his physical fitness recedes.
    Larks

    “It’s impossible”, said pride.
    “It’s risky”, said experience.
    “It’s pointless”, said reason.
    “Give it a try”, whispered the heart.

    LPBC Beneficiary

    "Keep away from people who try to belittle your ambitions. Small people always do that, but the really great make you feel that you, too, can become great!"

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •