Results 1 to 24 of 24

Thread: Storm damage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Storm damage

    My first experience.

    There was a storm here, a day or two before the yard hauled my boat... and I wasn't able to get down to RI until the day before yesterday, to discover that I have had some damage.

    As best as I can reconstruct events, it looks like one of my spring lines parted... or 'exploded', to be more descriptive. This apparently allowed the boat to move back in the slip, and bang against the piling between my slip, and the next.

    The damage isn't so big as to call for an insurance claim... especially since my deductible would be somewhat larger than the cost of repairs. The piling evidently ripped my stern barbecue right off it's bracket... that's around $200 or so. A bit worse, was the spreader which connects between the davits at the stern... the spreader got mangled, and that will probably cost around $500 to replace. The starboard stern rail is a bit bent, but I think it can be bent back into place.

    The worst damage: about a dozen gouges in the gelcoat on the starboard side, near the stern. These aren't deep or structural, at all... maybe 1/4" deep in places. I've done gelcoat repairs before, but I'm not the best at it... I might resort to having the yard fix them, because they've got a guy who is a magician with gelcoat. I'm guessing it will cost around $700 or so.

    The only bit of good news: since I've been using the new spray can anti-fouling on my prop and shaft, the prop and shaft stay amazingly clean... and this year, especially, the prop and shaft are so clean, I don't even have to pull the prop... I can just give it a fresh coat of the spray can stuff... it's amazing.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Too far inland.
    Posts
    7,677

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Life is far, FAAAAAAR too short for DIY gelcoat repair.
    A boatless inlander, searching for the meaning of life-aground.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Figment View Post
    Life is far, FAAAAAAR too short for DIY gelcoat repair.
    Well, I've done it before. It's not a problem getting it level and glossy... the problem is color matching. 'White' isn't necessarily 'white', for arbitrarily selected gelcoat brands.

    I have a bit of gelcoat damage at the bow, which I repaired a few years ago. From the perspective of smoothness and gloss, the repair came out perfect... but you can see the spots fairly clearly, because the color doesn't quite match.

    Many years ago, when I bought a brand new Catalina, the boat came with a couple of cans of gelcoat, intended for repairs. I don't remember the Jeanneau providing any, though... I bought this boat in 2005.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    Portland, Maine
    Posts
    12,127

    Default Re: Storm damage

    I have a couple of "magicians" I don't think twice about using. I expect the list to grow.
    Study Peace

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    5,611

    Default Re: Storm damage

    That was quite the storm. 1/4 inch is thick for just gelcoat. I would expect to see some glass that deep. Then again, your boat is a bit bigger than mine.
    __________________________________________________ ________________________

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    usa
    Posts
    5,611

    Default Re: Storm damage

    My boat being the nautical equivalent of an airport car I handle any damage as follows: I sand down any damage, apply epoxy and glass as necessary, sand and paint with Pettits to the nearest color. I’m prolly not helping the resale value any.
    __________________________________________________ ________________________

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by CK 17 View Post
    That was quite the storm. 1/4 inch is thick for just gelcoat. I would expect to see some glass that deep. Then again, your boat is a bit bigger than mine.
    Yeah, the gouges do go deep enough to reveal the roving or mat under the gelcoat... but each gouge is small, maybe 3/4" or less, and definitely not structural. They're spread over an area of about a square foot, or so.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Caribbean cliff edge
    Posts
    14,789

    Default Re: Storm damage

    What is your 'deductible' amount?
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Rum_Pirate View Post
    What is your 'deductible' amount?
    $3600.... 2% of declared hull value.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Caribbean cliff edge
    Posts
    14,789

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    $3600.... 2% of declared hull value.
    Deductables are rough. It is like paying an additional premium on top!!!
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Rum_Pirate View Post
    Deductables are rough. It is like paying an additional premium on top!!!
    In 30 years of sailing, I only made an insurance claim once... back around 1996, when we were holed up in Plymouth, waiting out a storm, and we suffered delamination damage on our starboard side due to being pounded against the dock, despite copious fenders. At that time, the damage was $12,000... and the deductible on that boat was around $3000.

    I can understand the need for a deductible, when it comes to property damage. I'm less enthusiastic about the use of deductibles in health insurance.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    seattle
    Posts
    12,038

    Default Re: Storm damage

    We had 50 knot winds gusting to 60 yesterday. I haven’t been down to the boat yet but I can see her with binocs from the house. Boat is still in the slip and the dinghy cover is still on, I’ll go down soon and check. I probably should replace some lines. Norman, did your line part at a chafe point or just too much tension?

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Caribbean cliff edge
    Posts
    14,789

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Norman Bernstein View Post
    In 30 years of sailing, I only made an insurance claim once... back around 1996, when we were holed up in Plymouth, waiting out a storm, and we suffered delamination damage on our starboard side due to being pounded against the dock, despite copious fenders. At that time, the damage was $12,000... and the deductible on that boat was around $3000.

    I can understand the need for a deductible, when it comes to property damage. I'm less enthusiastic about the use of deductibles in health insurance.
    What sort of premium do you pay say for $100K.

    Here on a $20k (power)boat I pay $950.00. Ouch.
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Rum_Pirate View Post
    What sort of premium do you pay say for $100K.

    Here on a $20k (power)boat I pay $950.00. Ouch.
    I believe my premium is about $1800, for a boat probably worth around $180K... not too bad, all things considered. The policy covers the tender, as well, with no deductible for that. It includes both damage claims, as well as some amount of liability... I don't recall how much.

    Frankly, I haven't 'shopped' the policy in many years, although I imagine that better rates might be had these days. One interesting point is that the customer declares the hull value, and the policy doesn't revisit that issue on an annual basis, so it's up to the owner to adjust the coverages as the boat depreciates. For a number of years, I didn't change it, and probably ended up paying more than I could have.

    One important inclusion: the policy will pay for a short term haul-out in the event of a hurricane warning. In my particular case, my boat was scheduled to be hauled out, just a few days after the storm struck... I guess the yard didn't have enough time to get me out, any earlier.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Caribbean cliff edge
    Posts
    14,789

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Hope your repairs are less costly than you think.
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    13,641

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Many years ago, when I bought a brand new Catalina, the boat came with a couple of cans of gelcoat, intended for repairs. I don't remember the Jeanneau providing any, though... I bought this boat in 2005.
    Even if they had provided factory-matched colored gelcoat, it wouldn't match anymore. The decade in the sun has changed the shade of your boat's color. I would match as close as possible, compound the spot and then NOT wax that area. The more UV damage the new repair undergoes, the sooner it will more closely match your old gelcoat. But it likely never will. If you're keeping the boat, consider painting it: that will hide all evils. The stern quarter is a pretty visible location, unfortunately.

    FWIW, and I am sorry for your need for repair, but I suspect you will find that those fiberglass repairs run you twice what you estimate. They would around here, anyway.


    Good luck, Norman. Glad it wasn't too bad.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Rum_Pirate View Post
    Hope your repairs are less costly than you think.
    My experience with hiring the yard to do any repairs is that any speculation on the cost will always be wildly optimistic.... the yard's charges are ALWAYS vastly more than one thinks. This is the primary reason why I almost NEVER ask the yard to do any work on my boat... I do all the maintenence myself, with the only exceptions being things I am not equipped or experienced enough to do. For example, I needed to have a 2" thru-hull replaced, and clearly didn't have the expertise... OR, frankly, the physical strength... to do it... and the bill was $750. I'm still guessing that the gelcoat repairs will result in a $700 bill... but if it ends up being higher than that, I probably won't be all that surprised.

    The damage to the davit spreader requires a replacement of the spreader, for sure.... and I've asked Dave Thomas, at Ocean Marine Systems, to quote me a price. The only other thing is what appears to be a modest bend in the top rail of the stern pulpit... and I might be able to bend it back into shape, or live with it.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Even if they had provided factory-matched colored gelcoat, it wouldn't match anymore. The decade in the sun has changed the shade of your boat's color. I would match as close as possible, compound the spot and then NOT wax that area. The more UV damage the new repair undergoes, the sooner it will more closely match your old gelcoat. But it likely never will. If you're keeping the boat, consider painting it: that will hide all evils. The stern quarter is a pretty visible location, unfortunately.
    Well, paint is out of the question, unless I wanted to Awlgrip the entire hull... and that would run around $18K-$20K, or so I'm told.

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    FWIW, and I am sorry for your need for repair, but I suspect you will find that those fiberglass repairs run you twice what you estimate. They would around here, anyway.
    I'll see what they have to say. If the price seems absurd, I'll fix it myself, and live with the minor color mismatch. I DO know how to get it level and glossy, by myself. Of course, it will have to wait for the spring, when the temperature is more appropriate.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Caribbean cliff edge
    Posts
    14,789

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Post a pic or two of the before and afters. We can then sympathise with your pain.
    Enjoy a good rum on the rocks at sunset.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov 2000
    Location
    Burlington, Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada.
    Posts
    6,306

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Thanks for the reminder. I just sent a few e-mails out to surveyors to see if any of them ever come up this way. We will see if it is worth it to get a survey and insurance. I'm guessing it won't be worth it.
    Stay calm, be brave....wait for the signs. Possibly precariously prevaricating.
    .

  21. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Sharon, MA
    Posts
    17,289

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Quote Originally Posted by ron ll View Post
    We had 50 knot winds gusting to 60 yesterday. I haven’t been down to the boat yet but I can see her with binocs from the house. Boat is still in the slip and the dinghy cover is still on, I’ll go down soon and check. I probably should replace some lines. Norman, did your line part at a chafe point or just too much tension?
    Sorry I missed your question, Ron. The line failure was not due to chafe... the line, which was 1/2" nylon, parted about 12" away from where it was looped around the midships cleat.

    I had doubled both the spring lines, as well as the bow and stern lines... with my heavy 3/4" nylon 'storm' lines at the bow and stern. However, whenever you double a line like that, it's nearly impossible to insure that both lines are bearing equivalent loads. The point of doubling is really to provide a backup, not to double the capacity.
    "Fact is that which enough people believe. Truth is determined by how fervently they believe it."
    --- Charles Pierce







  22. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    RI ,USA
    Posts
    1,348

    Default Re: Storm damage

    East Winds are not kind to Greenwich Bay.

  23. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Hills of Vermont, USA
    Posts
    21,064

    Default Re: Storm damage

    Glad to hear your damage wasn't worse Norm!

    No boat damage, but as I headed out to the airport Monday AM @ 3:15 I moved 5 trees out of the road, but the 6th was too big & I didn't take a chainsaw with me as I didn't want to leave it in the car at the airport for a week. As I turned around to get back in the car, I got to about the front bumper & kawhoomp! 10-12" pine right on top of the car I'd just bought it a month before. However, I'm still alive (branches hit me, but not the tree). Estimate (covered by comprehensive) is about $8K.

    My anemometer recorded a gust of 73MPH & many more in the high 60's before the power went out.
    "If it ain't broke, you're not trying." - Red Green

  24. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    13,641

    Default Re: Storm damage

    However, whenever you double a line like that, it's nearly impossible to insure that both lines are bearing equivalent loads. The point of doubling is really to provide a backup, not to double the capacity.
    When I double lines, I purposely leave slack in one set. That way, the back up line never sees any stress at all unless the primary line parts. I also go for different purchases where possible; i.e, different dock cleats.

    Kevin
    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •