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Thread: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    There are ten of these and they are big. Imagine the cost were they bronze. Not to mention all the leakage. This is simple, just a lexan pane sliding in a track. As you can see, the pane buries into a flange at the forward end and there is plenty of overlap at the aft end. Last winter it got really tested when Meg was at the dock and snow was blown over the stern. (Last pic) None got in.



    The bottom rail has weepholes between ports.

  2. #2
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    Showing the aft-facing overlap


  3. #3
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"


  4. #4
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    Armada, MI, USA
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    I once had a power cruiser with a similar setup. It works great, but I do have some advice regarding their maintenance. First, make sure the drain holes are as large as is practical. On mine, the drain holes were so small that any dirt or gunk that accumulated in the lower track quickly clogged them. Second, keep the lower track clean. Otherwise, a layer of dirt will build up like a thin layer of felt and it will stay wet forever. I was a slow learner, and on my boat those lower tracks were one of the worst rot pockets on the boat. By the way, Ian, I think your boat is wonderful.

  5. #5
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    They do not get tested at the dock.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    I thought fifty knots with blowing snow over the stern was at least a little test.

    In normal conditions abuse comes from ahead where they are more secure.

    On Granuaile the panes were a little loose in the track and could rattle in the wind. If there was rain, water would get pumped on the bottom from the outside of the pane around to the inside and then up and over. Only a little easily contained by the inner drip trough but still annoying. It was eliminated by a thumbscrew fastener which also provides security against a skinny intruder. Meg has yet to be fitted with such locks. Her lexan, heavier and thicker than Granuaile's plexi, does not vibrate in the wind.

    As installed, these ports do not have gaskets. In the event of a knockdown roll-over, water pressure will press the lexan panes against the cabin sides but I imagine there would be some squeek-through leakage. Just as there is in most boats' conventional ports.

  7. #7
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    20 Thumbs Up ( for once it's useful to be all thumbs )
    This is the first lesson ye should learn: There is so much good in the worst of us, and so much bad in the best of us, it doesn't behoove any of us to speak evil of the rest of us.
    E. Cayce

  8. #8
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    Ian I love simple as much as anyone. But I think in a half gale with blowing spray, yer gonna get wet.
    I see they are strong and will not blow in, I mean the kind of leak that will travel side to side and 6 feet fore n aft.

  9. #9
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    The did not leak in any weather with Granuaile except for the pumping I mentioned. And Meg's didn't even do that over the last year. I always had more trouble with the gaskets of conventional ports, especially if screwed down unevenly.

    Because the Bahamian port is outside, it can be made stronger and more watertight than the Herreshoff wiley port, which has the very cool feature of being something you can leave partly open in a rain.


  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 1999
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    West Boothbay Harbor, Maine
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    We've got bigger ones on the cabinsides of our motor boat. They are made of tempered glass, however.
    "... and the great shroud of the sea rolled on as it rolled five thousand years ago."

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
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    Pleasant Valley NS Canada
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    Ian and I discussed these windows to some great extent. I will admit that these are the first of the type that I have encountered here in the seasonal north. My only reservation about them has yet to be tested, but I suspect that will happen next season, and if found to be lacking, will be an easy 'fix'. I wonder if they will stay in place when rail-down and punching to windward (maybe Ian's too much a gentleman to sail upwind?) when vibration and repeated water impacts from ahead collaborate to slide them open. If so, a simple peg in the track will lock them in place.
    Hope for the best, but plan for the worst.

  12. #12
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    I like the concept. And would like to consider using them on my build. How much of a curve in the cabin side can this type of port tolerate?

  13. #13
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    Aug 2010
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    BC Coast
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    Default Re: Meg's "Bahamian Ports"

    The traditional test us to direct a fire hose directly on the closure. I suspect these will be fine, maybe not for Cape Horn, but for the near coastal cruising I suspect Ian will be doing I'd be surprised if they were more of a problem than any other opening port.
    These light-for-for-their-size boats do not tend to fight the sea as much as more normal ballasted keel boat cruisers. At least that is my experience with Whimbrel.
    We have one of those windows on the aft end of the cabin opposite the companion way. Ours is inside rather than outside. Being partially sheltered, the only time I see water drops on it is when I hose the deck. I check the drain holes regularly.

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