Results 1 to 20 of 20

Thread: Samilling

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,971

    Default Samilling

    Some of you will know of my background in sawmilling, BIG bandsaws with 400 hp motors, logs flying through at high speed, the resawing and processing lines downstream of the headrig, all that.
    But production sawmills dont work for boatbuilders, they're focussed on throughput for the construction market and wont slow down to quarter saw or preserve width.
    Heres a sawmill that may interest some of you boatbuilders, long lengths, wide stock, sawn to suit your needs.

    https://www.jcitouchwood.ca/

    For those who wonder what I mean by BIG bandsaws, scroll down the home page and check out the blade being serviced, small pic on the right.
    Compare that with the little 14in unit in your shop.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,718

    Default Re: Samilling

    The smaller bandmills can be a good option John and the US is thick with them.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 1999
    Location
    Hyannis, MA, USA
    Posts
    42,783

    Default Re: Samilling

    Sure beats two guys and a pit.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Location
    Armada, MI, USA
    Posts
    150

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    The smaller bandmills can be a good option John and the US is thick with them.
    I thought that was the answer too. But I learned a sad truth when I visited a couple of them looking for longer lengths of cedar and white oak. It was easy to find quarter sawn white oak, but only in short lengths. Mostly 10 feet, a few at 12 feet. I asked why. The guy told me that a log has to be about 30" in diameter to be a good candidate for quarter sawing. He could easily buy a white oak log in that size, but there is no way he could get it off the truck or handle it around the yard. He just didn't have equipment that big; too much weight. With white cedar, things are even worse. Nobody I talked with had any idea where they could find cedar logs capable of producing long, clear, boards in any width.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    UK. Cornwall, Suffolk.
    Posts
    3,424

    Default Re: Samilling

    Local sawyer near me.. run from a tractor outside the shed with a Perkins 6435; the driveshaft is 50 feet long and goes around 6 corners.
    French hardware I believe.




  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2000
    Location
    N.E. Connecticut.
    Posts
    5,274

    Default Re: Samilling

    We have a sawmill near here with (to me) a fairly impressive bandsaw, not up to the one you posted John, but still pretty good.

    The guard is open to change the blade



    A couple of spare blades



    The sharpening setup. I like the braided rugs on the floor.







  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: Samilling

    WOW! I wonder if JCI's where Edensaw gets some of their lumber? I had a guy come out with a little portable mill and saw up some downed cedar I had, but it couldn't cut more than 32" X 20'. My logs were shorter than that, but I have enough to make some trim for the house and some nice furniture. Maybe enough left over for a small stripper?
    IMG_3774.jpgIMG_3780.jpg
    Hmmmm...wonder why those are coming in so small? They've uploaded fine in the past.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    3,879

    Default Re: Samilling

    The trick is to get the big guys to saw out clear free of heartwood beams for you then take them to a smaller bandmill for resawing to your required dimensions.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    690

    Default Re: Samilling

    I thought that name was familiar. They are one of the bigger "small" mills here in Terrace, BC.

    I am surprised he is running off a genset. But I guess there is only single phase power on the poles out his way.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    1,694

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Bartlett View Post
    I thought that was the answer too. But I learned a sad truth when I visited a couple of them looking for longer lengths of cedar and white oak. It was easy to find quarter sawn white oak, but only in short lengths. Mostly 10 feet, a few at 12 feet. I asked why. The guy told me that a log has to be about 30" in diameter to be a good candidate for quarter sawing. He could easily buy a white oak log in that size, but there is no way he could get it off the truck or handle it around the yard. He just didn't have equipment that big; too much weight. With white cedar, things are even worse. Nobody I talked with had any idea where they could find cedar logs capable of producing long, clear, boards in any width.
    There is a good size steam powered mill in Oregon.
    http://www.hulloakes.com/products.html

    EDIT #2 https://youtu.be/cF_BR1Cf-9c
    Last edited by MN Dave; 11-09-2017 at 07:43 PM. Reason: 'god size' works, but was not intended
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    St. Helens, Oregon
    Posts
    567

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by MN Dave View Post
    There is a god size steam powered mill in Oregon.
    http://www.hulloakes.com/products.html
    I think we're going to go have to check them out! It's only about three hours from here and they may have the lase DONAL Company sawmill setworks in operation. My father-in-law designed and marketed the setworks in the '50s, predating the modern computerized systems. He cannibalized an old Bubble Front Wurlitzer Juke Box for the switches for the prototype. My wife would rather have the Juke Box back

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    East Quogue,NY
    Posts
    13,636

    Default Re: Samilling

    Ohh, this little thing?

    There are two kinds of boaters: those who have run aground, and those who lie about it.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr 2000
    Location
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    4,021

    Default Re: Samilling

    For an individual, a hobbyist boatbuilder, an option is a chainsaw mill like a Granberg.

    I have a stack of 23ft boards of clear white ash. Trying finding that in a store.

    It's noisy and a bit wasteful, and slow, but the work is done in the woods, and no big machinery is required.

    Obviously you need to access a woodlot, but that's quite do-able.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,718

    Default Re: Samilling

    Owning and using a chainsaw mill is enough to make a man build his own band mill.

    Band mill.jpg
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,971

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    The smaller bandmills can be a good option John and the US is thick with them.
    I've run a couple of them, have installed and commissioned Woodmizer and Baker mills, useful machines.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,971

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by Breakaway View Post
    Ohh, this little thing?

    Yep, incidentally those bands have a limited life and are no use to the mill after they hit their limit. The steel is really good though, tough and holds an edge, if you talk sweetly to the head saw filer you can sometimes swap one for a case of beer or somesuch, and you've a lifetime supply of steel with which to make small edge tools. That band is probably 1/8th in thick.

    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Location
    Northern NSW Australia
    Posts
    63,718

    Default Re: Samilling

    About the best knife making steel around but be careful if the material directly beside a gullet until you have inspected it carefully. Those blades occasionally develop fine cracks at the gullet.
    '' You ain't gonna learn what you don't want to know. ''
    Grateful Dead

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    Lindstrom, MN
    Posts
    1,694

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    About the best knife making steel around but be careful if the material directly beside a gullet until you have inspected it carefully. Those blades occasionally develop fine cracks at the gullet.
    Yes, look out for fatigue cracks.
    I did a little digging and it looks like large band saw blades are generally made from Udelholm 15N20 and is popular with knife makers.
    Management is the art of counting beans. Leadership is the art of making every being count. --Joe Finch

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Hell
    Posts
    81,829

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Hadfield View Post
    For an individual, a hobbyist boatbuilder, an option is a chainsaw mill like a Granberg.

    I have a stack of 23ft boards of clear white ash. Trying finding that in a store.

    It's noisy and a bit wasteful, and slow, but the work is done in the woods, and no big machinery is required.

    Obviously you need to access a woodlot, but that's quite do-able.
    i have a couple of chainsaw mills including one that I built from scratch. I mostly hate them and find knocking logs into quarters with wedges then running these through my shop twenty inch bandsaw a better alternative.
    Simpler is better, except when complicated looks really cool.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hamilton New Zealand
    Posts
    3,971

    Default Re: Samilling

    Quote Originally Posted by PeterSibley View Post
    About the best knife making steel around but be careful if the material directly beside a gullet until you have inspected it carefully. Those blades occasionally develop fine cracks at the gullet.
    Yes, dead right. The small ones, thats the 3 and 4 inch wide bands make really good cabinet scrapers.
    Another source of good steel are the blades from big planer matchers doing square dressing or eased edge framing, when the knife is resharpened to a stage where its no longer wide enough to be safely secured in the cutter head they're generally thrown out. Marvellous stuff for making small chisels and carving tools.


    John Welsford
    An expert is but a beginner with experience.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •